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View Full Version : Duel engine A/C, what happens when losing one engine in flight?



Charlie901
10-28-2004, 11:20 AM
Is the A/C supposed to pull to the engine side/sideslip or attempt to flip over, if one engine suddenly stops while your cruising along, if you do nothing to lower the working engine RPM or adjust the rudder?

Is this modelled in PF?

Charlie901
10-28-2004, 11:20 AM
Is the A/C supposed to pull to the engine side/sideslip or attempt to flip over, if one engine suddenly stops while your cruising along, if you do nothing to lower the working engine RPM or adjust the rudder?

Is this modelled in PF?

Atomic_Marten
10-28-2004, 11:40 AM
Hm. If one engine of twin-engined a/c's (like Bf110) fails (for whatever reason) you should be able to keep it in air, of course in that case you will have problems (more or less, depending on type of a/c) while doing so. But fliping over and stuff will eventually occur if you don't do anything.

You can easily correct that with rudder and some trimming (about this trimming stuff I'm not sure I'm only guessing that aileron trim would be handy http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif).

This is moddeled in v2.04. For PF I have no idea, since I don't have a copy. Yet. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Stuntie
10-28-2004, 02:53 PM
As long as it's not on take off with a heavy bomb load you can usually sort it out and land ok.

Reminds me though of one of those famous maintanience quotes.

Pilot in maintaninence records:
Lost port engine during flight.

Maintaince crew:
Found engine under port wing after brief search.

Buzzer1
10-28-2004, 03:45 PM
Switching off one engine in the A20 has NO effect.
Disappointed by this - as it should tourque my plane rather violently until I can trim it to a more stable attitute- and I should at least have to use some skill to stay in the air.
Even Warbirds in 1997 had loss of stability/tourqe effect on multi-engine A/C.
Here it had no effect whatsoever (and it was turned on in realism settingshttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif)

effte
10-29-2004, 03:10 AM
Squawk: €œ#4 engine missing€
Mech writeoff: €œ#4 engine found on wing after brief search.€

Squawk: €œEvidence of fluid leak on right MLG strut€.
Mech writeoff: €œEvidence removed€.

Squawk: €œOuter left MLG tire almost needs replacing€
Mech writeoff: €œOuter left MLG tire almost replaced€

As long as you have enough airspeed and a remaining power margin, losing an engine shouldn€t be a big deal at all. At lower airspeeds (close to Vmc, minimum control airspeed) it will require more attention and a speedier response by the pilot. Lower the nose to maintain airspeed, identify the dead engine (€˜dead foot, dead engine€ €" the pedal you don€t have to push to keep going straight is on the side of the dead engine), feather the dead engine, bank a little into the live engine.

Below Vmc, you will need to gain airspeed to regain control. Say your altitude... ?

Then again, some of the twins in this simulation probably have a negative power margin with an engine out. That means you will not be able do maintain altitude if you lose an engine. Get rid of weight (ordnance) or find a place to land. As the saying goes, when one engine fails on a twin-engine airplane you always have enough power left to get you to the scene of the crash...

Cheers,
Fred

BinaryFalcon
10-29-2004, 06:43 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Duel engine A/C, what happens when losing one engine in flight? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

They stop dueling.

That's about it.

The key to keep them from dueling in the first place is to look at them sternly when they first start misbehaving and say, "I'll turn this plane around and we'll go right back home if you two don't knock it off!"

Bonus points for getting "losing" right though. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif