PDA

View Full Version : Good read 3......



XyZspineZyX
09-25-2003, 07:01 PM
and in his earlier training days...........

l2th October, 1940.
I had hoped for a posting to an operational unit this month
Unfortunately, training is far behind schedule, because of the
bad autumn weather.
We have a rough time in training here also. There have been
one or two fatal accidents every week for the past six weeks in
our Course alone. Today Sergeant Schmidt crashed and was
killed. He was one of our section of five.
We have spent several days on theoretical conversion train-
ing before flying the Messerschmitt 109, which is difficult to
handle and dangerous at first. We can now go through every
movement in our sleep.
This morning we brought out the first 109 and were ready to
fly. Sergeant Schmidt was chosen as the first of us, by draw-
ing lots. He took off without difficulty, which was something,
as the aircraft will only too readily crash on take-off if one is not
careful. A premature attempt to climb will cause it to whip
over into a spin, swiftly and surely. I have seen that happen
hundreds of times, and it frequently means the death of the
pilot.
Schmidt came in to land after making one circuit; but he
misjudged the speed, which was higher than that to which he
was accustomed, and so he overshot the runway. He came
round again, and the same thing happened. We began to
worry, for Sergeant Schmidt had obviously lost his nerve.
He was coming in and making a final turn before flattening out to touch down, when the aircraft suddenly stalled because of insufficient speed and spun out of control, crashing into the ground and exploding a few hundred feet short of the end of the runway. We all raced like madmen over to the scene of
the crash. I was the first to arrive. Schmidt had been
thrown clear, and was lying several feet away from the flaming
wreckage. He was screaming like an animal, covered in blood.
I stooped down over the body of my comrade, and saw that both legs were missing. I held his head. The screams were
driving me insane. Blood poured over my hands. I have
never felt so helpless in my life. The screaming finally
stopped, and became an even more terrible silence. Then
Kuhl and the others arrived, but by that time Schmidt was dead.
Major von Kornatzky ordered training to be resumed forth-
with, and less than an hour later the next 109 was brought out.
this time it was my turn.
I went into the hangar and washed the blood off my hands.
Then the mechanics tightened up my safety-belt, and I was
taxiing over to the take-off point. My heart was madly thump-
ing. Not even the deafening roar of the engine was loud
enough to drown out of my ears the lingering screams of my
comrade as he lay there dying like an animal. I was no sooner
airborne than I noticed the stains on my flying-suit. They
were great dark bloodstains, and I was frightened. It was a
horrible, paralysing fear. I could only be thankful that there
was no one else present to see how terrified I was.
I circled the field for several minutes, and gradually recovered
from the panic. At last I was sufficiently calm to come in for
a landing. Everything was all right. I took off immediately
and landed again. And a third time.
Tears were still in my eyes when I pushed open the canopy
and removed my helmet. When I jumped down from the
wing I found I could not control the shaking of my knees.
Suddenly I saw Kornatzky standing in front of me. Steely
blue eyes seemed to be boring right through me.
" Were you frightened? "
" Yes, sir."
" Better get used to it if you hope to go on operations."
That really hurt. I was so ashamed I wished the ground
would swallow me up.



<CENTER>http://www.world-wide-net.com/tuskegeeairmen/ta-1943.jpg <marquee><FONT COLOR="RED"><FONT SIZE="+1">"Straighten up.......Fly right..~S~"<FONT SIZE> </marquee> http://www.geocities.com/rt_bearcat

<CENTER><FONT COLOR="ORANGE">vflyer@comcast.net<FONT COLOR>
<Center><div style="width:200;color:red;font-size:18pt;filter:shadow Blur[color=red,strength=8)">99th Pursuit Squadron

XyZspineZyX
09-25-2003, 07:01 PM
and in his earlier training days...........

l2th October, 1940.
I had hoped for a posting to an operational unit this month
Unfortunately, training is far behind schedule, because of the
bad autumn weather.
We have a rough time in training here also. There have been
one or two fatal accidents every week for the past six weeks in
our Course alone. Today Sergeant Schmidt crashed and was
killed. He was one of our section of five.
We have spent several days on theoretical conversion train-
ing before flying the Messerschmitt 109, which is difficult to
handle and dangerous at first. We can now go through every
movement in our sleep.
This morning we brought out the first 109 and were ready to
fly. Sergeant Schmidt was chosen as the first of us, by draw-
ing lots. He took off without difficulty, which was something,
as the aircraft will only too readily crash on take-off if one is not
careful. A premature attempt to climb will cause it to whip
over into a spin, swiftly and surely. I have seen that happen
hundreds of times, and it frequently means the death of the
pilot.
Schmidt came in to land after making one circuit; but he
misjudged the speed, which was higher than that to which he
was accustomed, and so he overshot the runway. He came
round again, and the same thing happened. We began to
worry, for Sergeant Schmidt had obviously lost his nerve.
He was coming in and making a final turn before flattening out to touch down, when the aircraft suddenly stalled because of insufficient speed and spun out of control, crashing into the ground and exploding a few hundred feet short of the end of the runway. We all raced like madmen over to the scene of
the crash. I was the first to arrive. Schmidt had been
thrown clear, and was lying several feet away from the flaming
wreckage. He was screaming like an animal, covered in blood.
I stooped down over the body of my comrade, and saw that both legs were missing. I held his head. The screams were
driving me insane. Blood poured over my hands. I have
never felt so helpless in my life. The screaming finally
stopped, and became an even more terrible silence. Then
Kuhl and the others arrived, but by that time Schmidt was dead.
Major von Kornatzky ordered training to be resumed forth-
with, and less than an hour later the next 109 was brought out.
this time it was my turn.
I went into the hangar and washed the blood off my hands.
Then the mechanics tightened up my safety-belt, and I was
taxiing over to the take-off point. My heart was madly thump-
ing. Not even the deafening roar of the engine was loud
enough to drown out of my ears the lingering screams of my
comrade as he lay there dying like an animal. I was no sooner
airborne than I noticed the stains on my flying-suit. They
were great dark bloodstains, and I was frightened. It was a
horrible, paralysing fear. I could only be thankful that there
was no one else present to see how terrified I was.
I circled the field for several minutes, and gradually recovered
from the panic. At last I was sufficiently calm to come in for
a landing. Everything was all right. I took off immediately
and landed again. And a third time.
Tears were still in my eyes when I pushed open the canopy
and removed my helmet. When I jumped down from the
wing I found I could not control the shaking of my knees.
Suddenly I saw Kornatzky standing in front of me. Steely
blue eyes seemed to be boring right through me.
" Were you frightened? "
" Yes, sir."
" Better get used to it if you hope to go on operations."
That really hurt. I was so ashamed I wished the ground
would swallow me up.



<CENTER>http://www.world-wide-net.com/tuskegeeairmen/ta-1943.jpg <marquee><FONT COLOR="RED"><FONT SIZE="+1">"Straighten up.......Fly right..~S~"<FONT SIZE> </marquee> http://www.geocities.com/rt_bearcat

<CENTER><FONT COLOR="ORANGE">vflyer@comcast.net<FONT COLOR>
<Center><div style="width:200;color:red;font-size:18pt;filter:shadow Blur[color=red,strength=8)">99th Pursuit Squadron

XyZspineZyX
09-25-2003, 09:52 PM
bump

<CENTER>http://www.world-wide-net.com/tuskegeeairmen/ta-1943.jpg <marquee><FONT COLOR="RED"><FONT SIZE="+1">"Straighten up.......Fly right..~S~"<FONT SIZE> </marquee> http://www.geocities.com/rt_bearcat

<CENTER><FONT COLOR="ORANGE">vflyer@comcast.net<FONT COLOR>
<Center><div style="width:200;color:red;font-size:18pt;filter:shadow Blur[color=red,strength=8)">99th Pursuit Squadron

XyZspineZyX
09-25-2003, 10:12 PM
:O



Where are the first three

1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye
shall be judged: and with what
measure ye mete, it shall be
measured to you again.

http://acompletewasteofspace.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/logo_phpBB.gif (http://acompletewasteofspace.com/forum/index.php)

XyZspineZyX
09-25-2003, 10:18 PM
Just below this I tried to bump them but people keep missing them...LOL

<CENTER>http://www.world-wide-net.com/tuskegeeairmen/ta-1943.jpg <marquee><FONT COLOR="RED"><FONT SIZE="+1">"Straighten up.......Fly right..~S~"<FONT SIZE> </marquee> http://www.geocities.com/rt_bearcat

<CENTER><FONT COLOR="ORANGE">vflyer@comcast.net<FONT COLOR>
<Center><div style="width:200;color:red;font-size:18pt;filter:shadow Blur[color=red,strength=8)">99th Pursuit Squadron

XyZspineZyX
09-25-2003, 10:19 PM
I've got them now /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif


Is there a web-site we can visit?



1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye
shall be judged: and with what
measure ye mete, it shall be
measured to you again.

http://acompletewasteofspace.com/forum/templates/subSilver/images/logo_phpBB.gif (http://acompletewasteofspace.com/forum/index.php)

XyZspineZyX
09-25-2003, 10:55 PM
It has been a long time since I've read a memoir that is of this quality and such an easy read. You've sold me Bearcat. Thanx!

XyZspineZyX
09-26-2003, 12:07 PM
BUMP /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

JG53 PikAs Abbuzze
I./Gruppe

http://www.jg53-pikas.de/
http://mitglied.lycos.de/p123/Ani_pikasbanner_langsam.gif