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Tranie117
11-01-2008, 04:50 PM
So, I've ben playing for a few months now and I basically only fly the P-38 (I use the term "fly" loosly). I mean I've had the odd mess around but not actually flown any other plane propally (i.e. in a straight line). I'd like to fly something eles for a change, although I do love the P-38. Everything eles I try I suck in. I'd like to fly something that's as stable as the P-38, as a start, to get used to other planes. Although It would be nice if It wasn't a huge jocking bomber, I can barely take off land and prehaps shoot down the odd zero. I don't think I need to start thinking about Bombing.

So basically, what planes are as stable as the P-38?

steiner562
11-01-2008, 04:54 PM
p-40 comes to mind,its what I learned on and it has a very stable gun platform.

Skoshi Tiger
11-01-2008, 05:10 PM
Have you worked out the trim system yet?

To get a "stable" aircraft you'll need to bind some keys ( I uses dials on a home made box) to the trim controls otherwise you'll be fighting the aircraft all the time.

Even a stable aircraft like the P-40 needs constant adjstment of trim to get it to fly right. Different planes will have a combination of elevator, rudder and aileron trim, so you'll need to check out the aircraft notes on the CD.

Sirrith
11-01-2008, 06:28 PM
The SBD is quite stable IIRC http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif so is the Hurricane.

Dustysquareback
11-01-2008, 07:02 PM
Stable planes that I usually train my noob friends with:

Hurricane, all marks.

P-40 (E is the best)

Il2 (great all rounder)

A6M3 Zero (others are good too, but thats my fav)

M_Gunz
11-01-2008, 07:47 PM
Tranie117: Are you just picking a plane and jumping into combat with it?

Divine-Wind
11-02-2008, 06:58 AM
If you only bounce from plane to plane just trying them, you will most likely suck in most (If not all) of them.
I'll let you in on a secret... The best way to get good with a plane is to practice. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif

That said, the P-40 is pretty stable. As is the SBD and the Hurricane. Oh, and the C-47, and the Ju-52. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

p51srule
11-03-2008, 09:57 AM
Ive got experience from another game so I didnt to much pracite to master almost all the planes. But I got to amid the hurri, SBD, and the Bf-109 are very easy planes to master.

P51srule http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/metal.gif

"Speed is life in a dogfight"

WTE_Galway
11-03-2008, 10:16 PM
Originally posted by Tranie117:
So, I've ben playing for a few months now and I basically only fly the P-38 (I use the term "fly" loosly). I mean I've had the odd mess around but not actually flown any other plane propally (i.e. in a straight line). I'd like to fly something eles for a change, although I do love the P-38. Everything eles I try I suck in. I'd like to fly something that's as stable as the P-38, as a start, to get used to other planes. Although It would be nice if It wasn't a huge jocking bomber, I can barely take off land and prehaps shoot down the odd zero. I don't think I need to start thinking about Bombing.

So basically, what planes are as stable as the P-38?


Well there is always the aircraft the sim is named after ... the IL2.

mortoma
11-03-2008, 10:21 PM
Stable is another name for the Republic P-47 Thunderbolt. An in game it flies stable too. And it's torque behavior is not too severe while being strong enough to help a beginner learn the torque reaction. The P-40 has more torque and so is not as good of a trainer plane.

Divine-Wind
11-03-2008, 11:06 PM
Well, the P-40 was used as a trainer, so I figured it must be sort of stable. At least ingame.

M_Gunz
11-04-2008, 01:25 AM
P-40 would be a very advanced trainer....

The most stable planes tend to be bombers, dive bombers, torpedo planes, transports, etc

Stability is a relative terms in some uses. You don't want fighters as stable and slow to
maneuver as an Avenger or DC-3.

LovroSL
11-04-2008, 03:57 AM
Hurry is very stable IMO
and it turns good too

M_Gunz
11-04-2008, 04:17 AM
Not the quickest roll rate by far though.

OD_
11-04-2008, 07:12 AM
F4F Wildcat - great aircraft for stability, easy to land on carriers if you want to practice that. Just remember the manual landing gear.

Hurricane is great, go for the MkIIc with the 4 20mm cannon and Zeros will just disappear!

Mosquito would be good as well, twin engines like the P-38...can vapourise bombers.

Wildnoob
11-04-2008, 07:46 AM
I already complain a lot of this here because of this, but have to say that make fligths at a constant altitude is becoming a less problem for me.

I make adjustments with elevator trim and some very ligth corrections with the stick constantly allow me to fly without almost any problem now.

PhantomKira
11-06-2008, 11:58 PM
I'd stear clear of the 109 and anything else with a narrow gear track (not much distance between the two wheels when in the down position) if I were you. This tends to lead to ground looping, which won't help you when you're just learning to land. Also, you're going to have some trouble, as the P-38 is one of about three aircraft in the game (the P-39 being another) that has a nose wheel. All other fighters have tailwheels, and it's a slightly different beast. Basically the same, you just have to be more careful about directional control on the ground, as the tail will tend to swing around on you in a tailwheel aircraft. Also, map a key for locking the tailwheel and use it, it helps with directional ground control. Of course, you'll also have torque to deal with, which isn't an issue in the P-38, due to two counter-rotating props, that cancel each others' torque.

P.FunkAdelic
11-07-2008, 12:34 AM
I learned almost right away when I was having 1 in 10 chances of landing a P-40 that I could land literally any tricycle gear airplane. I mean you seem to be able to abuse the hell out of those things and come in at horrid angles and speeds and land safely.

The secret to good landings is knowing your aircraft to begin with. They all behave differently. You definitely want to know your dirty stall speeds (meaning the minimum speed you can stay above stall with your gear and flaps down) so that you can keep yourself as slow as possible on descent. With a Zero its an absurdly slow 110 Km/h while with a 109 I think its closer to 160 or 150.

Throttle for descent rate and pitch angle for speed control. Its so very satisfying to realize you're in the glidepath so perfectly that you know you'll land without even trying.

Pick an airfield, circle it at about 300m and practice your final approach. I do that with every airplane I feel like flying online and its amazing how different some of them behave in the landing sequence.

Kettenhunde
11-07-2008, 05:23 AM
Well, the P-40 was used as a trainer, so I figured it must be sort of stable.

One might think that but the reality is very different. Most trainers, especially advanced trainers are designed to develop skill sets in the pilots they train under the guidance of a more experienced pilot. So if you think about it, it makes sense to train your pilots to handle things when they are tough under guidance rather than shoving them into a more difficult situation without support.

The aircraft's characteristics often are much "worse" or exaggerated in order to develop that skill set. The actual operational aircraft tends to be much "milder" in behaviors.


The first flight was 6 July, 1999 at Petersburg, VA. These days, I've got what, to some, is a lot of time in the T-6; to others, not so much.

The airplane is harder to fly than a P-51. I've flown both now, and I never would have never thought that was true. Understand, it's nothing a competent pilot can't handle, but the aircraft is the consummate trainer; she demands constant attention to be flown well just like the T-38 did.



http://www.warbirdalley.com/t6.htm

The P40 was not an easy fighter to fly. It was every bit a high performance machine that demanded the utmost attention from its pilots. When they master the skills of flying a demanding aircraft, it was much easier to handle additional distractions like combat tactics to the mix.

http://www.raafwarbirds.org.au/targetvraaf/p40_archive/...ort_783a_Part_09.pdf (http://www.raafwarbirds.org.au/targetvraaf/p40_archive/pdfs/avia/AVIA_734_Report_783a_Part_09.pdf)


The P-40 Warhawk will never be enshrined in the Hall of Fame of Fantastic Fighters. It was too slow, couldn't turn tight enough, was hard to handle on the ground and, compared to some fighters, had nasty stall characteristics. Further, its hydraulic system was too complicated, its landing gear too rudimentary and its Allison V-12 too anemic.


http://www.flightjournal.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&nm=&ty...4EFF87B60FEB13E8C984 (http://www.flightjournal.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&nm=&type=news&mod=News&mid=9A02E3B96F2A415ABC72CB5F516B4C10&tier=3&nid=5545A2E0170E4EFF87B60FEB13E8C984)


All the best,

Crumpp

Divine-Wind
11-07-2008, 09:01 AM
Eh, I see your point. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Bearcat99
11-08-2008, 10:45 AM
P-40
Zero
Spitfile
Hurris
Las

All are very stable.. and a few some others have mentioned.. but you have to make sure your controls are set up right as well. Because torque is modeled when you change your throttle settings often on some planes you will have to adjust your rudder trim... and in some planes a little nose down trim will actually give you abit more stability.

dirkpit7
11-09-2008, 03:48 AM
Originally posted by Bearcat99:
P-40
Zero
Spitfile
Hurris
Las

All are very stable.. and a few some others have mentioned.. but you have to make sure your controls are set up right as well. Because torque is modeled when you change your throttle settings often on some planes you will have to adjust your rudder trim... and in some planes a little nose down trim will actually give you abit more stability.

Spitfire? My impression is that it needs a lot of trimming and is unstable when firing.

WTE_Galway
11-09-2008, 04:18 PM
nobody is recommending the P39 ???

lezbianseagull
11-09-2008, 10:38 PM
A6 Zero...

Perfect for the begginer....

It is very hard to stall, and has enough meanuverabilty to get you out of any "steering" problems.

It's made of balsa wood, so if anything hits you you are toast...but it really is a pleasure to fly.