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JR_Greenhorn
11-02-2004, 08:17 AM
As an engineering student limited to only the English language, I have become curious about the titles I have seen before the names of some Italian and German engineers. I have read in motorcycle magazines of the late Ing. F. Taglioni, and while recently checking the Flug Werk site, I noticed one of the founders titled as: Dipl. Ing. Hans Günther Wildmoser.

I have been wondering what the full spelling of these words are in their respective languages, and what is the custom for using these titles for engineers in these two countries. Are they used for all engineers, or only for Doctors?

JR_Greenhorn
11-02-2004, 08:17 AM
As an engineering student limited to only the English language, I have become curious about the titles I have seen before the names of some Italian and German engineers. I have read in motorcycle magazines of the late Ing. F. Taglioni, and while recently checking the Flug Werk site, I noticed one of the founders titled as: Dipl. Ing. Hans Günther Wildmoser.

I have been wondering what the full spelling of these words are in their respective languages, and what is the custom for using these titles for engineers in these two countries. Are they used for all engineers, or only for Doctors?

JtD
11-02-2004, 08:42 AM
For Germany it's

Diplom Ingenieur (Dipl.-Ing.)

Basically everyone who has graduated from a German Univerity in Engineering get's this title.

Doktor (Dr.-Ing.)

is the next academic title you can get. Some will make their Doktor right after University, some will get some practice before that. If you stay a the Universtiy, think you have to add "habil." to your title.

Some people are very proud of their titles, some don't care.
Usually you don't use Dipl.-Ing. in coversations, but Dr. has to be said. That of course only if you don't use the surname.

Dipl.-Ing. Hans Meier would be either Herr Meier or Hans, while Dr.-Ing. Hans Meier would be either Doktor Meier or Hans.

JR_Greenhorn
11-02-2004, 09:19 AM
Is "Diplom" roughly translated as diploma or degree, then? Is there no Master's level of graduate work in German Universities?

ITA_5SA_Tecnico
11-02-2004, 10:07 AM
In Italy there is only one title for engeneer is "Ingegnere",for a simple reason,because our studies was on five years for a total of 30 exams,with a final "exam" named "tesi di laurea" or "tesi" in current talking,after the tesi you get the title of "Dottore Ingegnere",and finally if you pass a state exam
for professional attitude,you are a "Ingegnere",the title before the name is "ingegner" or abbr. "Ing.".Now with the new
organisation of the University there is a "Diploma di Laurea" in three years or the five years "Laurea",but the title for now is the same:Ingegnere.
There are some famous Italian Engeneer,
Ing.Mario Castoldi(Macchi's fighters and record planes)
Ing.Vittorio Jano (Ferrari's racing cars in the '30 '40 '50s)
Ing. Celestino Rosatelli (CR42 designer)
Ing. Corradino D'Ascanio (Vespa and helicopter mechanism inventor)

PS I work as laboratory technician in the Engeneer Faculty,in an Italian University!!

JtD
11-02-2004, 10:08 AM
There is no master in the traditional German education system. However, in recent years some universities introduced Bachelor and Master degrees.

Master is roughly equivalent to a Dipl.-Ing.

At my uni you have to study 3.5 years for a Bachelor, or 5 years each for Master or Dipl.-Ing.
Afaik you can make a Master after you made Bachelor, but you can't go on to diploma for some strange reasons that didn't make sense at all.

Probably is different at other Universities.

I'd translate Diplom with diploma.

I think it is/was possible to become an engineer without going to university (no academic degree, but doing the job), that's what they invented the diploma for.

ITA_5SA_Tecnico
11-02-2004, 10:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JtD:



I think it is/was possible to become an engineer without going to university (no academic degree, but doing the job), that's what they invented the diploma for. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

In Italy is possible this,but the title is "Ingegnere" ,University give the title for "Honoris Causa" ,and there is a very famous example for this: Enzo Ferrari