PDA

View Full Version : Kinda OT: Secret Weapons of WW2



adadaead
04-16-2005, 08:53 PM
Now i'm not talking just about planes, but i though if some you guys can find pictures of "secret weapons" that were developed in WW2. Actually i know that there is game called like that, and if i remember correctly from the screens, the had staff like Sherman tank with rocket launcher tubes above the tower, some secret jet/rocket planes, and even a jetpack straped to a soldier, an amphibious apc and staff like that. I just it could turn into interesting discussion.
I just can't find any interesting pictures to start it off http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

adadaead
04-16-2005, 08:53 PM
Now i'm not talking just about planes, but i though if some you guys can find pictures of "secret weapons" that were developed in WW2. Actually i know that there is game called like that, and if i remember correctly from the screens, the had staff like Sherman tank with rocket launcher tubes above the tower, some secret jet/rocket planes, and even a jetpack straped to a soldier, an amphibious apc and staff like that. I just it could turn into interesting discussion.
I just can't find any interesting pictures to start it off http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

jarink
04-16-2005, 09:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by adadaead:
Now i'm not talking just about planes, but i though if some you guys can find pictures of "secret weapons" that were developed in WW2. Actually i know that there is game called like that, and if i remember correctly from the screens, the had staff like Sherman tank with rocket launcher tubes above the tower, some secret jet/rocket planes, and even a jetpack straped to a soldier, an amphibious apc and staff like that. I just it could turn into interesting discussion.
I just can't find any interesting pictures to start it off http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The Sherman wasn't really secret; it was called the "Caliope" (a type of organ commonly used to play music at circuses).
http://www.ww2incolor.com/gallery/albums/us_army/calliope.jpg

There were several amphibious vehicles used on all sides during WWII, jeeps, trucks, etc. You might be thinking of the LVT Buffaloes used mainly in the Pacific (some were used in the ETO for river crossings)
http://www.2iemeguerre.com/blindes/images/Image1250.jpg

Some more secret weapons:
The Great Panjandrum (http://www.nevilshute.org/Engineering/JohnAnderson/topdown3.php)
http://www.nevilshute.org/Engineering/JohnAnderson/Graphics/topdown_3.jpg

Bachem Natter
http://www.raumfahrtgeschichte.de/images/natter2.jpg

FW 1000 x 1000 x 1000 (The designation meant that the aircraft could carry a 1000 kg bomb load 1000 km and fly at 1000 km/h.
http://www.luft46.com/fw/3bf1000b.gif

Wasserfall AA missle
http://www.luft46.com/missile/wfall-4.jpg

X-4 Air to air guided missle
http://www.luft46.com/missile/x4-13.jpg

Some of the most important secret weapons of WWII seem rather mundane today, but were extremely important and highly classified in WWII. They include Radar, cryptographic systems (Enigma machines, etc.), proximity fuses for AA shells (invaluable in the late PTO) and of course, the A-bomb.

masaker2005
04-17-2005, 03:01 AM
I know which game is that. And let me tell you 1/4 of that weapons was never used. I could say these: Jetpack, F-85 Goblin, Natter and Armstrong AW-52. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Skyraider3D
04-17-2005, 04:00 AM
Ay yes, the Battlefield 1942 add-on. It's a bit nonsense what they've done really. And some of the projects were distinctly post-war (XF-85) or non-existent (jetpack).

But a lot of secret stuff did see action in WW2, or was developed into something very real. The Horten Ho 229 was in production already, while the Natter was only hours(!) away from being used operationally, when the launch site was run over by the Allies in 1945. Air-to-air and ground-to-air missiles were already being used, albeit at a very limited scale. Ground-to-ground weapons (V1, V2) and Air-to-ground guided missiles (Hs 293) were even used on a wide scale. Also the Me 163 rocketfighter fits in this queue as being the first and only operational rocket fighter.

A really cool site about this subject is www.luft46.com (http://www.luft46.com)
Also, you may like my website www.skyraider3d.com (http://home.wanadoo.nl/r.j.o/skyraider), which has a number of secret weapons of the Luftwaffe on it. Here are two of my latest works:

Junkers EF 130 flying wing bomber (never built):
http://skyraider3d.military-meshes.com/gallery/JuEF130_1200.jpg

Henschel Hs P 122 high-altitude bomber (never built):
http://skyraider3d.military-meshes.com/gallery/HsP122_1200.jpg

The Henschel is a particularly interesting aircraft. It was topsecret and quite possibly the first aircraft specifically designed to deliver precision-guided bombs!
These two images were made for Monogram AViation Publications, almost a year and a half ago now.

adadaead
04-17-2005, 04:40 PM
WoW simply amazing staff, very interesting. Thanks to both of you. Thank for links too, i wonder if Russians or Japanese had any Secret staff, if anybody knows please post .
And it doesn't matter if they were used or not, but that Goblin that masaker mentioned wasn't it a rocket plane kinda looked like the German comet.

masaker2005
04-18-2005, 11:00 AM
Yes it is like a Komet, just a little difrent.

JR_Greenhorn
04-18-2005, 09:24 PM
Actually, the Goblin is quite different from a Komet, although they look similar.

The Goblin is a turbojet-powered parasite escort fighter, meaning it was to be carried with a bomber, released to fight off any interceptors, then reattach to the bomber somehow. Conversely, the Komet was a liqud-fuel rocket interceptor. Both aircraft had limited range and diminutive size, but differ greatly in purpose and powerplant.


The XP-85 Goblin (http://home.att.net/~jbaugher1/p85.html) wasn't the first attempt at the parasite concept. The first that I know of that the parasite concept was sucessful was the Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk (http://home.att.net/~jbaugher4/f9c.html) biplane fighter of the early 1930s. The Sparrowhawk was fitted with a hook on its top wing so it could be flown from and reattach to a "trapeze" (http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/b00001/b04184j.jpg) suspended below a the USS Akron (http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/ac-usn22/z-types/zrs4.htm) (ZRS-4) and USS Macon (http://www.lucidcafe.com/LUCIDCAFE/library/macon.html) (ZRS-5) rigid airships. In this case, the parasite fighter concept proved sucessful, however the rigid airship concept was more or less a failure (Think: Hindenburg).


There were other parasite fighter projects as well. If you have the merged version of PF, you can check out the Russian TB-3 SPB in game, which was one of the VVS Zveno (http://www.ctrl-c.liu.se/misc/ram/zveno.html) projects.

One of the last parasite fighter projects that I know of involves the Republic F-84 (http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/research/fighter/f84sp.htm) of the 1950s(Search "FICON" to learn more). The success of in-flight refueling made the parasite fighter concept obsolete.

http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/air_power/ap38.jpg
B-36/XF-85:
http://www.wpafb.af.mil/museum/history/postwwii/ficon.jpg

Does anyone remember the name of the Japanese sub that carried a seaplane inside? I should think that qualifies as a "Secret Weapon of WW2," or a hare-brained scheme at the very least.

Anyone interested in gunships should read about the YB-40 escort bomber project.
Weren't there some US planes (was it B-25?) outfitted to what would be the prerunner of the modern gunship concept used in the Pacific against Japanese shipping?

The late-war and immediate postwar mixed power fighters are interesting projects as well.

jarink
04-18-2005, 10:30 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JR_Greenhorn:
Does anyone remember the name of the Japanese sub that carried a seaplane inside? I should think that qualifies as a "Secret Weapon of WW2," or a hare-brained scheme at the very least. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

There were a couple Japanese sub types that carried a small foldable floatplane. The Germans tried the concept, too, and they also produced an unpowered autogyro that was used operationally. You are probably thinking of the I-400 class, though. It was a mammoth sub (400 feet long and over 3500 tons displacement - bigger than most destroyers) that was designed more as a submersible aircraft carrier (with 3 bombers) than a sub that carried a small observation plane.

I-400 (http://www.pacerfarm.org/i-400) http://www.pacerfarm.org/i-400/fig02f.jpg

raaaid
04-19-2005, 11:27 AM
what makes you think that all ww2 secret weapons have been disclosed?

ss general kammler was the boss of some of these operations

according to nick cook, a well known aviation writter, kammler was in charge of a time travel project called the bell

its also said that the usa had the philadelphia experiment going on

i mean if they had suceeded do you think they would ever tell us?

raaaid
04-19-2005, 11:47 AM
in fact i would say if i use logic that if nick cook is right and they tried to build a time bell they would have failed and now we would be told how the nazis were so stupid as to even try to develope a time machine as they chased the spear of destiny or the lost ark or the holy grail known by everybody as a prove of the nazi stupidity

but we are not told that they indeed try to build a time bell:
google nick cook nazi bell if you dont believe me

so they could have succeeded time traveling or not if they hadnt we would have been told of their trying to to show their stupidity

but seems nobody knows of this nazi time travel try what might mean it worked since we are not told about this try in order to show how stupids nazis were

may be they were not stupid nor crazy but just mean

ytareh
04-19-2005, 12:57 PM
I mentioned that Nick Cook book(The Hunt for Zero Point) in a past thread.It really is a must read for aviation tech/conspiracy theory/UFO etc enthusiasts.And before the sceptics start up ,Nick Cook is a Janes Defence Weekly military aviation consultant

raaaid
04-19-2005, 01:37 PM
heres a review of the hunt of 0 point:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/cdp/member-reviews/A2ELYGBTWY38DH/104-4757943-8459155?_encoding=UTF8&display=public&page=3