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woofiedog
02-02-2005, 11:40 PM
http://www.flightjournal.com/images/articles/wilde_sau/czypionka.jpg
While kneeling on the wing of the Planes of Fame Museum's Me 262, Jorg Czypionka reminisces about the greatest fighter aircraft he ever flew (photo by Thomas Cleaver).


Link: http://www.flightjournal.com/articles/wilde_sau/wilde_sau_1.asp

"As a unit, we were never all that successful against the Mosquitos," Czypionka recalls, "except for Oberleutnant Kurt Welter. He had at that time twenty or thirty kills at night, and seven or eight were Mosquitos. He was the most successful Wilde Sau pilot. When he got behind them, they went down. In a year, the unit had gotten perhaps ten total, and he had most of them."

Welter was determined to find a way to get the Mosquitos and sought to find a higher-performance aircraft that he would be able to fly at night. "Over Christmas 1944, he went to Rechlin, where he got them to show him how to fly the jets," Czypionka explains. Once there, Welter tried the Arado Ar.234, but the glass in the nose reflected too much light at night.

The plane Welter decided could do the job was the single-seat Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a Schwalbe (swallow). On January 2, 1945, he took off from Rechlin with the only armed Me 262 at the field. "Over Berlin, he caught five Mosquitos and shot them down," says Czypionka. "He told me it was easy." In one mission with the jet fighter, Welter had increased his score of Mosquito kills by more than 50 percent.

http://www.flightjournal.com/images/articles/wilde_sau/vulnerable_large.jpg

Welter didn't know it, but he had performed this feat in front of an important audience. In the city below, Hermann G├┬Âring watched the flares in the night sky as the British bombers exploded under the well-aimed fire of the Wilde Sau expert. "Welter later told me that the next morning, he got a call to report to the Reichsmarschall. He thought he was in a lot of trouble because there had been no authorization for what he was doing from the RLM. But G├┬Âring was really enthusiastic and asked him what he wanted to do. I think it helped that the Eichenlaub [Knight's Cross] was around his neck when he reported." As Czypionka tells it, Welter replied that he wanted to form a special unit of experienced pilots to use the single-seat Me 262 in the Wilde Sau role, specifically to target the Mosquitos. It was a request to which G├┬Âring quickly acceded.

Even with the approval of the commander of the Luftwaffe, Welter was unable to quickly organize the special unit, Czypionka recalls. "He could only get a couple of airplanes. They named the unit Kommando Welter, and it operated within NJG11 [Night Fighter Group 11]."

http://www.flightjournal.com/images/articles/wilde_sau/smithereens.jpg
With their airfields bombed to smithereens, the Germans hid their aircraft in the forests and used their new autobahns as runways. Allied soldiers eventually discovered many hidden aircraft in wooded areas (courtesy of Stan Piet).

Welter continued to fly his Me 262 from Burg bei Magdeburg through January and February, and he waged a personal war with the Mosquitos over the burning German cities. "In those seven weeks, he shot down perhaps twenty Mosquitos," Czypionka remembers. "In the whole of the previous year, an entire JaGe with special equipment did not shoot down more than ten, but he doubled that in seven weeks." The British crews soon knew that the Germans had something that could catch the Mosquitos even with the speed advantage that had been its defense since it first appeared over Europe in 1942. But no one thought it possible that a jet could be flown at night, or that a fighter without radar could accomplish such things. "Actually," Czypionka explains, "it really wasn't that hard to see them. The fires below would reflect on them, or, if they were over clouds, the searchlights would silhouette them. Having an airplane that could catch up to them almost as soon as they saw them made it easy."

http://www.militaryartgallery.com/Images_b/b_two_minutes_to_midnight.jpg
Two Minutes to Midnight
by
Robert Bailey
March 27th, 1945. Lt. Jorg Czypionka of 10./NJG-11 attacks a raiding R.A.F. Mosquito west of Berlin. The Mosquito is from R.A.F. 139 'Jamaica' Squadron, whose navigator is seen escaping through the pilot's overhead door, where he parachuted to captivity. The Mosquito pilot was listed as "missing in action".

woofiedog
02-02-2005, 11:40 PM
http://www.flightjournal.com/images/articles/wilde_sau/czypionka.jpg
While kneeling on the wing of the Planes of Fame Museum's Me 262, Jorg Czypionka reminisces about the greatest fighter aircraft he ever flew (photo by Thomas Cleaver).


Link: http://www.flightjournal.com/articles/wilde_sau/wilde_sau_1.asp

"As a unit, we were never all that successful against the Mosquitos," Czypionka recalls, "except for Oberleutnant Kurt Welter. He had at that time twenty or thirty kills at night, and seven or eight were Mosquitos. He was the most successful Wilde Sau pilot. When he got behind them, they went down. In a year, the unit had gotten perhaps ten total, and he had most of them."

Welter was determined to find a way to get the Mosquitos and sought to find a higher-performance aircraft that he would be able to fly at night. "Over Christmas 1944, he went to Rechlin, where he got them to show him how to fly the jets," Czypionka explains. Once there, Welter tried the Arado Ar.234, but the glass in the nose reflected too much light at night.

The plane Welter decided could do the job was the single-seat Messerschmitt Me 262A-1a Schwalbe (swallow). On January 2, 1945, he took off from Rechlin with the only armed Me 262 at the field. "Over Berlin, he caught five Mosquitos and shot them down," says Czypionka. "He told me it was easy." In one mission with the jet fighter, Welter had increased his score of Mosquito kills by more than 50 percent.

http://www.flightjournal.com/images/articles/wilde_sau/vulnerable_large.jpg

Welter didn't know it, but he had performed this feat in front of an important audience. In the city below, Hermann G├┬Âring watched the flares in the night sky as the British bombers exploded under the well-aimed fire of the Wilde Sau expert. "Welter later told me that the next morning, he got a call to report to the Reichsmarschall. He thought he was in a lot of trouble because there had been no authorization for what he was doing from the RLM. But G├┬Âring was really enthusiastic and asked him what he wanted to do. I think it helped that the Eichenlaub [Knight's Cross] was around his neck when he reported." As Czypionka tells it, Welter replied that he wanted to form a special unit of experienced pilots to use the single-seat Me 262 in the Wilde Sau role, specifically to target the Mosquitos. It was a request to which G├┬Âring quickly acceded.

Even with the approval of the commander of the Luftwaffe, Welter was unable to quickly organize the special unit, Czypionka recalls. "He could only get a couple of airplanes. They named the unit Kommando Welter, and it operated within NJG11 [Night Fighter Group 11]."

http://www.flightjournal.com/images/articles/wilde_sau/smithereens.jpg
With their airfields bombed to smithereens, the Germans hid their aircraft in the forests and used their new autobahns as runways. Allied soldiers eventually discovered many hidden aircraft in wooded areas (courtesy of Stan Piet).

Welter continued to fly his Me 262 from Burg bei Magdeburg through January and February, and he waged a personal war with the Mosquitos over the burning German cities. "In those seven weeks, he shot down perhaps twenty Mosquitos," Czypionka remembers. "In the whole of the previous year, an entire JaGe with special equipment did not shoot down more than ten, but he doubled that in seven weeks." The British crews soon knew that the Germans had something that could catch the Mosquitos even with the speed advantage that had been its defense since it first appeared over Europe in 1942. But no one thought it possible that a jet could be flown at night, or that a fighter without radar could accomplish such things. "Actually," Czypionka explains, "it really wasn't that hard to see them. The fires below would reflect on them, or, if they were over clouds, the searchlights would silhouette them. Having an airplane that could catch up to them almost as soon as they saw them made it easy."

http://www.militaryartgallery.com/Images_b/b_two_minutes_to_midnight.jpg
Two Minutes to Midnight
by
Robert Bailey
March 27th, 1945. Lt. Jorg Czypionka of 10./NJG-11 attacks a raiding R.A.F. Mosquito west of Berlin. The Mosquito is from R.A.F. 139 'Jamaica' Squadron, whose navigator is seen escaping through the pilot's overhead door, where he parachuted to captivity. The Mosquito pilot was listed as "missing in action".

woofiedog
02-03-2005, 12:01 AM
Link: http://www.ww2.dk/air/njagd/njg11.htm

http://njg11.tripod.com/0f1ea480.jpg
Captured Me-262 of NJG11
USA 4 - Messerschmitt Me262B-1/U1 - W.Nr.110635 - coded "Red 10" of IV./NJG11 - not handed over to Col.Watson

The first Gruppe of the NJG11 was formed on 28.8.44, relatively late in the war. From our sources, it shows that the Stab, the commanding brain of the squadron, was "never formed." I am in the process of verifying this information. The NJG 11 disbanded on 8.5.45.


The Nachtjagdgeschwader 11 is, to our knowledge, the only squadron of it's type utilizing Focke-Wulf FW-190A-6/R11's, Messerschmitt ME-109's, and Messerschmitt ME-262's rather than the ME-110's and their variants commonly used by the Third Reich throughout the war.


A few of these aircraft were equipped with the experimental FuG 217 Neptun J-2 radar, small three-pronged antenna receptacle devices for short- to medium-range aircraft detection. Little is known about this experimental radar; it is believed that all records were destroyed with the aircraft of the squadron, if any such information ever was recorded.


Although the NJG 11 existed for a short period of time, it is known that the number of kills inflicted by these experimental FW-190A-6's equipped with the Neptun radar had a far greater kill-to-loss ratio (almost double) that of the BF-110 equipped squadrons. Commanders attributed this to the maneuverability and versatility of the squadron, consisting primarily of BF-109's.


All of the planes of the NJG 11 were painted with RLM74 Grey Green and RLM75 Grey-Violet on the topside of the aircraft, and either Black or Light Grey on the bottom, depending on the time period.

10. staffel:
Formed 28.1.45 at Burg-Magdeburg from Sonderkommando Welter with Me 262 fighters (1. JD).
Bases:
28.1.45 - 12.4.45 Burg bei Magdeburg 1. JD Me 262A-1a
12.4.45 - 21.4.45 L├╝beck 1. JD Me 262A-1a
21.4.45 - 7.5.45 Reinfeld 2. JD Me 262A-1a
7.5.45 - 8.5.45 Schleswig-Jagel 3. JD Me 262A-1a

LEXX_Luthor
02-03-2005, 12:20 AM
Fascinating story.

ntinos made me a skin of that plane. Awsum

Zyzbot
02-03-2005, 09:07 AM
Welter was a controversial figure. He claimed 25 Mosquitos BUT he is officially credited with 6. Three while flying a FW-190 and three while flying the Me-262.

Unfortunately, he had a reputation among his own pilots as a man who made exagerated claims. We will never know for sure.

The book, "The Other Battle" has some more details if you are interested.

CWH1089
02-03-2005, 09:17 AM
interesting story. thanks for the post

woofiedog.

And i'll definitely look into that book

Zyzbot. thanks. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

JG7_Rall
02-03-2005, 09:23 AM
Wow, that was an awesome story. Even if he did overclaim, the man had some amazing skill. Thanks for taking the time to type that up, definitely an awesome story.

blairgowrie
02-03-2005, 09:26 AM
Thanks woofie. Very interesting stuff.

woofiedog
02-03-2005, 02:16 PM
Zyzbot... Thank's for the info on the book. I'll be checking that one out.
Thank's