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VMF-214_HaVoK
09-12-2007, 03:26 PM
I was browsing the net and stumbled upon this. Can anyone confirm if they are true? Some of them sound like fiction to me.

World War 2 Facts

* The first German serviceman killed in the war was killed by the Japanese (China, 1937)

* The first American serviceman killed was killed by the Russians (Finland 1940).

* 80% of Soviet males born in 1923 didn't survive World War 2

* The highest ranking American killed was Lt. Gen. Lesley McNair, killed by the US Army Air Corps.

* Between 1939 and 1945 the Allies dropped 3.4 million tons of bombs, An average of about 27,700 tons of bombs each month.

* 12,000 heavy bombers were shot down in World War 2

* 2/3 of Allied bomber crews were lost for each plane destroyed

* 3 or 4 ground men were wounded for each killed

* 6 bomber crewmen were killed for each one wounded

* Over 100,000 Allied bomber crewmen were killed over Europe

* There were 433 Medals of Honor awarded during World War 2, 219 of them were given after the receipiant's death

* From 6 June 1944 to 8 May 1945 in Europe the Allies had 200,000 dead and 550,000 wounded

* The youngest US serviceman was 12 year old Calvin Graham, USN. He was wounded in combat and given a Dishonorable Discharge for lying about his age. (His benefits were later restored by act of Congress).

* At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced "sink us"), the shoulder patch of the US Army's 45th Infantry division was the swastika, and Hitler's private train was named "Amerika". All three were soon changed for PR purposes.

* Germany lost 110 Division Commanders in combat

* 40,000 men served on U-Boats during World War 2; 30,000 never returned

* More US servicemen died in the Air Corps that the Marine Corps. While completing the required 30 missions, your chance of being killed was 71%. Not that bombers were helpless. A B-17 carried 4 tons of bombs and 1.5 tons of machine gun ammo. The US 8th Air Force shot down 6,098 fighter planes, 1 for every 12,700 shots fired.

* Germany's power grid was much more vulnerable than realized. One estimate is that if just 1% of the bombs dropped on German industry had instead been dropped on power plants, German industry would have collapsed.

* Generally speaking, there was no such thing as an average fighter pilot. You were either an ace or a target. For instance, Japanese ace Hiroyoshi Nishizawa shot down over 80 planes. He died while a passenger on a cargo plane.

* It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th found with a tracer round to aid in aiming. That was a mistake. The tracers had different ballistics so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target, 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet, the tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. That was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.

* When allied armies reached the Rhine, the first thing men did was pee in it. This was pretty universal from the lowest private to Winston Churchill (who made a big show of it) and Gen. Patton (who had himself photographed in the act).

* German Me-264 bombers were capable of bombing New York City but it wasn't worth the effort.

* A number of air crewmen died of farts. (ascending to 20,000 ft. in an un-pressurized aircraft causes intestinal gas to expand 300%!)

* Germany lost 40-45% of their aircraft during World War 2 to accidents

* The Russians destroyed over 500 German aircraft by ramming them in midair (they also sometimes cleared minefields by marching over them). "It takes a brave man not to be a hero in the Red Army". - Joseph Stalin

* The average German officer slot had to be refilled 9.2 times

* The US Army had more ships that the US Navy.

* The German Air Force had 22 infantry divisions, 2 armor divisions, and 11 paratroop divisions. None of them were capable of airborne operations. The German Army had paratroops who WERE capable of airborne operations.

* When the US Army landed in North Africa, among the equipment brought ashore were 3 complete Coca Cola bottling plants.

* 84 German Generals were executed by Hitler

* Among the first "Germans" captured at Normandy were several Koreans. They had been forced to fight for the Japanese Army until they were captured by the Russians and forced to fight for the Russian Army until they were captured by the Germans and forced to fight for the German Army until they were capture by the US Army.

* The Graf Spee never sank, The scuttling attempt failed and the ship was bought by the British. On board was Germany's newest radar system.

* One of Japan's methods of destroying tanks was to bury a very large artillery shell with on ly the nose exposed. When a tank came near the enough a soldier would whack the shell with a hammer. "Lack of weapons is no excuse for defeat." Lt. Gen. Mataguchi

* Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the fire-fight. It would have been worse if there had been Japanese on the island.

* The MISS ME was an unarmed Piper Cub. While spotting for US artillery her pilot saw a similar German plane doing the same thing. He dove on the German plane and he and his co-pilot fired their pistols damaging the German plane enough that it had to make a forced landing. Whereupon they landed and took the Germans prisoner. It is unknown where they put them since the MISS ME only had two seats.

* Most members of the Waffen SS were not German.

* Air attacks caused 1/3 of German Generals' deaths

* By D-Day, the Germans had 1.5 million railway workers operating 988,000 freight cars and used 29,000 per day

* The only nation that Germany declared war on was the USA.

* During the Japanese attack on Hong Kong, British officers objected to Canadian infantrymen taking up positions in the officer's mess. No enlisted men allowed!

* By D-Day, 35% of all German soldiers had been wounded at least once, 11% twice, 6% three times, 2% four times and 2% more than 4 times

* Nuclear physicist Niels Bohr was rescued in the nick of time from German occupied Denmark. While Danish resistance fighters provided covering fire he ran out the back door of his home stopping momentarily to grab a beer bottle full of precious "heavy water". He finally reached England still clutching the bottle, which contained beer. Perhaps some German drank the heavy water...

* Germany lost 136 Generals, which averages out to be 1 dead General every 2 weeks

S!

K_Freddie
09-12-2007, 03:37 PM
Originally posted by VMF-214_HaVoK:
* Germany's power grid was much more vulnerable than realized. One estimate is that if just 1% of the bombs dropped on German industry had instead been dropped on power plants, German industry would have collapsed.


Interesting... and this must have been an incredible oversight http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif
Probably the only attempt at this was the Dam-Busters.
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Bremspropeller
09-12-2007, 03:51 PM
LMAO http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Choctaw111
09-12-2007, 03:58 PM
Very interesting read. Thanks for sharing.

ploughman
09-12-2007, 04:02 PM
Some of that might even be true.

I like that the He-264 didn't bomb New York because it wasn't worth the effort. Duh.

crucislancer
09-12-2007, 04:26 PM
Some of these, if not all, were in a book called "Dirty LIttle Secrets of World War II", by Jim Dunnigan. I borrowed the book from one of my bandmates some time ago, it was a fun read, the kind of book you just flip to a page and read an entry. Some of the items above are in the book, for instance the one about the Army having more boats then the Navy, the Officer's club bit in Hong Kong, the name of Hitler's train.

Another one I remember was a study that was done that something like 75% of WWII aces were shorter on average and most had blonde hair and blue eyes, and most of them had daughters.

MrMojok
09-12-2007, 04:45 PM
Very nice!

I had heard a few of these before, but not all of them. Thanks for posting them Havok.

Jutocsa
09-12-2007, 05:23 PM
Some of those are true, and easy to check, like the highest ranking US soldier killed, or the youngest,12 y.o serviceman. Some are pure bs like the one with no average pilot, you are either an ace or prey. Most of it is just waffle or inaccurate...like the one with Waffen-SS (which indeed had more non-German soldiers but only at the end of the war)

slo_1_2_3
09-12-2007, 10:21 PM
I kinda hope some are fake I mean GAWd

* A number of air crewmen died of farts. (ascending to 20,000 ft. in an un-pressurized aircraft causes intestinal gas to expand 300%!)

And jeeze

* Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the fire-fight. It would have been worse if there had been Japanese on the island.

And uh , Minor oversight perhaps?

* At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced "sink us"), the shoulder patch of the US Army's 45th Infantry division was the swastika, and Hitler's private train was named "Amerika". All three were soon changed for PR purposes.

crucislancer
09-13-2007, 12:16 AM
Originally posted by slo_1_2_3:
I kinda hope some are fake I mean GAWd

* A number of air crewmen died of farts. (ascending to 20,000 ft. in an un-pressurized aircraft causes intestinal gas to expand 300%!)

And jeeze

* Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the fire-fight. It would have been worse if there had been Japanese on the island.

And uh , Minor oversight perhaps?

* At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced "sink us"), the shoulder patch of the US Army's 45th Infantry division was the swastika, and Hitler's private train was named "Amerika". All three were soon changed for PR purposes.

The bit about the farts isn't quite true, but airmen had to be careful of their diet due to the lack of pressurized cabins. If they had gas, it would get worse, and painful due to pressure changes. Debilitating, but I don't know about deadly.

K_Freddie
09-13-2007, 12:19 AM
Originally posted by slo_1_2_3:
I kinda hope some are fake I mean GAWd

* A number of air crewmen died of farts. (ascending to 20,000 ft. in an un-pressurized aircraft causes intestinal gas to expand 300%!)

A few children in Brazil have supposibly died from internal gas expansion - after drinking Coca-Cola and Mentos mint sweets.
Have you seen this demonstration. ?

So it's very possible, but as they say only a few people who might have been pre-disposed to this.

Bewolf
09-13-2007, 02:45 AM
* The Graf Spee never sank, The scuttling attempt failed and the ship was bought by the British. On board was Germany's newest radar system.


This pretty much tells enough about the credebility of this list.

general_kalle
09-13-2007, 03:22 AM
fate of Graf spee (http://www.powell-pressburger.org/Images/56_BoRP/GrafSpee.jpg)

i dont believe the thing about Graf spee not sunk.
cant be true.

and some of them sounds a bit wierd to be true.
like

which kind of ships had the US army?
Landing crafts
can hardly be called ships,
i find it hard to believe that the army had more ships than the army

the Kiska incident (if i can call it that)
i find quite easy to believe.
comparing the the usual way of americans to attack i find it quite plausible

what happens if you drink heavy water?

R_Target
09-13-2007, 03:45 AM
The Aleutians have some of the worst fog in the world, which makes identification of anyone or anything difficult. I would'nt consider .0006% a very bad friendly fire loss under the circumstances. The Japanese had used the same impenetrable fog to hastily evacuate the island a few weeks earlier.

Most of these factoids contain truth, but can be a bit misleading.


* Germany lost 40-45% of their aircraft during World War 2 to accidents

All air forces had significant operational losses.


* At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced "sink us")

This lasted not much longer than the time it took for Admiral King to figure it out, and was changed to COMINCH.

EDCF_Rama
09-13-2007, 04:00 AM
Originally posted by general_kalle:
what happens if you drink heavy water?

You will be a little heavier than if you drink the same amount of normal water... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

Deadmeat313
09-13-2007, 04:06 AM
From Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_pocket_battleship_Admiral_Graf_Spee) :

"Immediately after the scuttling in shallow water much of the ship's superstructure remained above water level, but then over the years the wreck subsided into the muddy bottom and today only the tip of the mast remains above the surface.

The first salvage from the ship was most likely carried out by Royal Navy intelligence teams which recovered the highly advanced Seetakt radar not destroyed in the scuttling. In February, 1940 the wreck was boarded by US Navy sailors from the light cruiser USS Helena."


T.

leitmotiv
09-13-2007, 04:13 AM
Source?

GRAF SPEE not sinking correct. The ship settled in mud up to the weather deck. The charges in the forward part of the ship failed to blow; thus, the forward turret and the forward superstructure remained intact. The radar apparatus was completely intact. The British were allowed to grab the Seetakt radar which was the latest surface search radar the German navy had. Don't know about the British buying the wreck. Wouldn't surprise me---clever bistids!

Breeze147
09-13-2007, 06:07 AM
Originally posted by K_Freddie:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by slo_1_2_3:
I kinda hope some are fake I mean GAWd

* A number of air crewmen died of farts. (ascending to 20,000 ft. in an un-pressurized aircraft causes intestinal gas to expand 300%!)

A few children in Brazil have supposibly died from internal gas expansion - after drinking Coca-Cola and Mentos mint sweets.
Have you seen this demonstration. ?

So it's very possible, but as they say only a few people who might have been pre-disposed to this. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

"Mythbusters" blew that one up. (Unitentionally funny).

Breeze147
09-13-2007, 06:08 AM
Originally posted by general_kalle:
fate of Graf spee (http://www.powell-pressburger.org/Images/56_BoRP/GrafSpee.jpg)

what happens if you drink heavy water?

Later on, you take a heavy piss.

BOA_Allmenroder
09-13-2007, 07:16 AM
The fact that gases expand at high altitudes is demonstrated to every pilot undergoing high altitude orientation. The chamber operators simply tie off a marginally filled balloon and hang it from the ceiling of the chamber. As the pressure decreases inside the chamber, the gas inside the balloon expands so that the balloon becomes very very large (expanded). I don't remember if they continued to raise altitude (ie decrease chamber pressure) until the balloon popped or not.

They warned you to be careful of what type foods you ate prior to high altitude missions.

There have been several cases/anectdotes of aircrew 'explosively' reliving themselves at altitude in unpressurized aircraft.

BSS_Goat
09-13-2007, 07:28 AM
CHARTS!!!! WHERE ARE THE F@#KING CHARTS!!!

flox
09-13-2007, 09:02 AM
* It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th found with a tracer round to aid in aiming. That was a mistake. The tracers had different ballistics so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target, 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet, the tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. That was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.


This is a new one on me. Can anyone speak to the accuracy of it? I don't believe that the tracers have a different trajectory in the game do they? If so, I'm in for some major rethinking of how I aim.

DrHerb
09-13-2007, 09:13 AM
So essentially, eating beans before hi alt flight could kill you?

Talk about porked!

*BADOOM CHIIIING!*

crucislancer
09-13-2007, 09:35 AM
Originally posted by flox:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">* It was a common practice on fighter planes to load every 5th found with a tracer round to aid in aiming. That was a mistake. The tracers had different ballistics so (at long range) if your tracers were hitting the target, 80% of your rounds were missing. Worse yet, the tracers instantly told your enemy he was under fire and from which direction. Worst of all was the practice of loading a string of tracers at the end of the belt to tell you that you were out of ammo. That was definitely not something you wanted to tell the enemy. Units that stopped using tracers saw their success rate nearly double and their loss rate go down.


This is a new one on me. Can anyone speak to the accuracy of it? I don't believe that the tracers have a different trajectory in the game do they? If so, I'm in for some major rethinking of how I aim. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I've read the tracer thing before, it was either in that "Dirty LIttle Secrets of WWII" book I mentioned earlier, or something else that I read recently.

general_kalle
09-13-2007, 09:52 AM
about the tracer thing.
i believe it was that way in real life
however in the game it seams like that the only bullets are the tracers?

isnt that true?
i have never got any chance to test it but for the 20mm british Hispano cannons theres no dirt spitting up on the ground unless its a tracer that impakts that means all shells would be tracer shells
unrealistic?

Choctaw111
09-13-2007, 10:04 AM
Originally posted by general_kalle:

what happens if you drink heavy water?

Nothing. Heavy water actually occurs naturally (but very rare) in the world. Heavy water is simply the Hydrogen Atoms having an extra Neutron (which is harmless) creating the isotope Deuterium. During the nuclear research for the atom bomb scientists actually scoured the Great Lakes in search of heavy water. A very slow and tedious process given the fact the 1 out of every so many thousands of water molecules is a heavy water molecule. We have already consumed countless heavy water molecules and no harm done.

Choctaw111
09-13-2007, 10:08 AM
Originally posted by general_kalle:
about the tracer thing.
i believe it was that way in real life
however in the game it seams like that the only bullets are the tracers?

isnt that true?
i have never got any chance to test it but for the 20mm british Hispano cannons theres no dirt spitting up on the ground unless its a tracer that impakts that means all shells would be tracer shells
unrealistic?

Not true. Il2 models ALL bullets, even non tracers, for ALL gun types. I have tested every gun for this. I am a guns and ballistics guy and these are the things that I like to test in Il2. Now for Oleg to model the bullets even AFTER the tracers burn out (at least for a little while). The Mk108 rounds traveled for about 50 meters after they burned out but not the others that I had seen. I cannot remember what patch that was.

Warrington_Wolf
09-13-2007, 10:24 AM
Originally posted by crucislancer:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by slo_1_2_3:
I kinda hope some are fake I mean GAWd

* A number of air crewmen died of farts. (ascending to 20,000 ft. in an un-pressurized aircraft causes intestinal gas to expand 300%!)

And jeeze

* Following a massive naval bombardment, 35,000 US and Canadian troops stormed ashore at Kiska. 21 troops were killed in the fire-fight. It would have been worse if there had been Japanese on the island.

And uh , Minor oversight perhaps?

* At the time of Pearl Harbor, the top US Navy command was called CINCUS (pronounced "sink us"), the shoulder patch of the US Army's 45th Infantry division was the swastika, and Hitler's private train was named "Amerika". All three were soon changed for PR purposes.

The bit about the farts isn't quite true, but airmen had to be careful of their diet due to the lack of pressurized cabins. If they had gas, it would get worse, and painful due to pressure changes. Debilitating, but I don't know about deadly. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Where did you think the phrase "silent but deadly" came from http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif.

joeap
09-13-2007, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by general_kalle:

the Kiska incident (if i can call it that)
i find quite easy to believe.
comparing the the usual way of americans to attack i find it quite plausible



Well Kiska was a "non-battle" but Attu was a battle...the Japanese had to be fought there (there were 2 islands taken) and there were roughly 1,481 Allied (mostly American) dead vs. 2,351 Japanese confirmed dead (probably more). In fact one of the largest Banzai charges of WWII took place there.

Aleutian Islands Battle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Aleutian_Islands)

VMF-214_HaVoK
09-13-2007, 01:00 PM
In SoW I want the ability to removed tracers if I want. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

S!

flox
09-13-2007, 02:42 PM
HaVok that would be historically accurate wouldn't it? Wasn't it possible to have ammo with no tracers to be loaded?

VMF-214_HaVoK
09-13-2007, 02:57 PM
Im sure it was.

flox
09-13-2007, 03:02 PM
Kinda reminds me of the original DOS Red Baron game in which you could choose regular ammo vs. incendiary http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

bhunter2112
09-13-2007, 06:35 PM
93% of regular IL2 players thought BOB was comming out in 07.
7% are named BOB.