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Avont29
07-24-2007, 08:37 PM
im playing around with CEM in corsair to get the max ou tof my plane, so i follow this guide for the rpms of pratt and whitney engine

takeoff - 2700 rpm

climb/combat - 2500 rpm

cruise - 2100 rpm

so whats better to keep the prop pitch(rpm for corsair) and throttle at the same percentges to get these values or to keep throttle at 100% but lower prop pitch(rpm on corsair) to get desired rpm

i defaintely get some performance, using that guide, i can definately say i flew p-51 using a guide for rp's and got better performance

Avont29
07-24-2007, 08:37 PM
im playing around with CEM in corsair to get the max ou tof my plane, so i follow this guide for the rpms of pratt and whitney engine

takeoff - 2700 rpm

climb/combat - 2500 rpm

cruise - 2100 rpm

so whats better to keep the prop pitch(rpm for corsair) and throttle at the same percentges to get these values or to keep throttle at 100% but lower prop pitch(rpm on corsair) to get desired rpm

i defaintely get some performance, using that guide, i can definately say i flew p-51 using a guide for rp's and got better performance

Avont29
07-24-2007, 08:38 PM
i thought corsair cruising speed was 420 mph, i was crusing at the cruise rpm and was hlding only a steady 280 mph i think it was 280 mighthave been 220

Klemm.co
07-25-2007, 01:31 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Avont29:
i thought corsair cruising speed was 420 mph, i was crusing at the cruise rpm and was hlding only a steady 280 mph i think it was 280 mighthave been 220 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
You've gotta acknowledge the difference between IAS (Indicated Air Speed) and TAS (True Air Speed).
Your IAS is always lower than your TAS, they are nearly the same at sea level, at 30000 feet the difference is huge. Just go into the QMB, turn off your cockpit, and see your true speed (its only displayed in km/h though).
Hope this helps.

stansdds
07-25-2007, 04:17 AM
The Corsair cannot cruise at 420 mph, that is approximately the maximum speed attainable by the F4U-1D (but in this sim, all variants have the same flight characteristics). The prop control sets the engine RPM, the throttle sets the manifold pressure. The maximum cruise setting for the -1 series of Corsairs is 2150 RPM and 34 inches Hg manifold pressure, this changes to 2050 RPM at altitudes of 26,000 feet or more. Supercharger in neutral up to 13,000 feet, low blower from 13,000 to 22,000 feet and high at 22,000 feet or higher. This is straight from the pilot's manual. There are also settings for minimum fuel consumption, but the maps in IL2 are small enough that you really don't need to use such settings and to use them properly you need full control of the mixture, which we don't have.

Avont29
07-25-2007, 06:02 AM
no not all planes in this game have same flight characteristics, you can switch to manual prop pitch in 190 and 109

but messing around with prop pitch, mixture, and throttle, definately has some advantages, like keeping the engine cool, etc.

Crash_Moses
07-25-2007, 06:14 AM
He said all variants...of the Corsair. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Avont29
07-25-2007, 06:53 AM
oh haha, ok

buzzsaw1939
07-27-2007, 02:02 PM
Klemm.co...we need to make a slight correction here! your IAS is not always lower than you TAS! IAS is the speed of the air messured by an instrument, no matter how high or low you are, TAS is speed over the ground. ie, flying down wind, would make you faster. TAS is for navigation, IAS is for staying in the air! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

buzzsaw1939
07-27-2007, 02:43 PM
Oh.. I forgot to mention, the techno junkies will be along shortly to impress you with thier aeronautical knowledge! OHH! sarcasim, so early in the day! shame on me! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif

OMK_Hand
07-27-2007, 03:20 PM
These are from the American manual, which is altogether more complex than the British manual.

I think these are right.

Take Off:
Cowl open position 6 (2/3 open)
1 degree trim nose up
6 degrees trim Right wing down
6 degrees trim nose right
Flaps full
2700 rpm (100%) 52.5" (97%) 5 min

Detailed Climb Settings
(Throttle % is initial only. Open the throttle as the MP falls when climbing to maintain the desired

setting, up to full throttle (100%))

Military power climb using: 2700 rpm (100%) 125 knots. (Cowl flaps open?)

S.L. to 1,700' : 52.5" (97%) Neutral blower
1,700' to 5,500' : F.T. Shift to Low blower when mp drops to 45" at full throttle
5,500' to 16,000' : 53" (97%) Low blower
16,000' to 18,000' : F.T. Shift to High blower when mp drops to 50" at full throttle
18,000' to 21,000' : 53" (97%) High blower

Normal climb using: 2550 rpm (90%) 125 knots

S.L. to 5,500' : 44" (77%) Neutral blower
5,500' to 7,000' : F.T. Shift to Low blower when mp drops to 41.5" at full throttle
7,000' to 16,500' : 49.5" (90%) Low blower
16,500' to 18,000' : F.T. Shift to High blower when mp drops to 47" at full throttle
18,000' to 22,000' : 49.5" (90%) High blower


Cruise: 2550 rpm (90%) 44" (78%)

Economy Cruise: 2150 rpm (70%) 34" (53%)

Minimum Fuel Consumption: 1300 rpm 30" (44%)

All Cruising using lowest possible gear (i.e. if you can achieve 34" mp at full throttle in neutral blower,

or at half throttle in low blower, then use full throttle in neutral blower.)


Combat: 2700 rpm (100%) 52.5" for 5 minutes max.
Use: Low blower = if less than 44" at full throtle in Neutral blower : Use High blower = if less than 47" at

full throttle in Low blower

War Emergency Power: 2700 rpm, 57.5" for 5 min max.

20 degrees of flaps may be used at speeds up to 200 Knots

When cruising, first gain speed using climbing power in level flight before adopting your chosen cruise setting.

Klemm.co
07-27-2007, 03:48 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by buzzsaw1939:
Klemm.co...we need to make a slight correction here! your IAS is not always lower than you TAS! IAS is the speed of the air messured by an instrument, no matter how high or low you are, TAS is speed over the ground. ie, flying down wind, would make you faster. TAS is for navigation, IAS is for staying in the air! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Yeah I know, but I meant in IL-2! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Maybe in stormy weather in IL-2 flying downwind will give you higher IAS than TAS (wind speed is only 30 kph though IIRC). But when flying with the Focke at five meters the IAS is still lower.
And normally your'e flying in good wheather, right? And that little difference doesn't beat it.
Soo... in IL-2 your'e nearly always slower than your TAS. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

But for pure flying puposes i always look at the IAS, of course.
I guess they did'nt really need a TAS indicator back then, because all flying limitations related to the IAS. Kinda makes sense.
It just gets the noobs off playing this game who are thinking that they are flying 300 while they are going 600.

Klemm.co
07-27-2007, 03:56 PM
I guess it just is time for that video again http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6j-1EyouN0

buzzsaw1939
07-27-2007, 04:13 PM
I keep forgetting, that folks are talking about the sim, and not reality! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif carry on! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

stansdds
07-28-2007, 05:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Klemm.co:
I guess it just is time for that video again http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6j-1EyouN0 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yep, an notice that with the Coffman cartridge starter system the prop moves quite fast, the starter that Oleg gave us is a combination of Coffman cartridge and electric starter.

All Il2 Corsairs: Press the ignition, the prop begins to rotate, there is a "pop" from the starter cartridge (much quieter than a real Coffman starter), then the whine of an electric starter motor engergizing, then engaging (like a B-25 starter system), then the engine fires up. Totally wrong for all Corsairs.

F4U-1 and -1A's all had Coffman starters as did all F6F Hellcats.

F4U-1C/D and all subsequent Corsairs used an electric starter that did not even require energizing. When ready to start these Corsairs, you would use the starter with the ignition "off" to turn the prop through three or four revolutions (could also be done by a ground crewman manually), then prime, ignition "on", hold the starter switch until the engine was running smoothly.