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Zarathael
12-08-2004, 11:48 PM
I was flying over Okinawa a while ago, escorting B-29's, and at a certain point the formation was attacked by Raidens. I and my wingmen managed to dispatch them, the bombers took no damage, but in the process I got clipped. Took at least one round in my oil tank. The aircraft was responding fine, the engine was still at full power, but well we all know that wasn't going to last. I did the typical gaming thing, dove down and strafed the nearest airbase, then landed in the countryside. After that though, I got the thought of what it would have been like to have been in a situation like that in reality. In an aircraft that is going to fail on you, soon, over hostile territory, with safety a thousand miles away. The thoughts that would be going through you head at that point are hard to imagine. In reality I guess the plan would have been to fly out to sea as far as possible, ditch and hope to be picked up by friendly forces, but even that would have been pretty long odds when your life was at stake. Just gives a bit of insight into what war really is, what the people who were there, and are there now really have to face, the price that has to be paid.

Oh well that's pretty much the point of this topic, share stories, insights into what it was really like to have been there, either stories of those who actually were, or just things you've learned and thought about through the game.

Zarathael
12-08-2004, 11:48 PM
I was flying over Okinawa a while ago, escorting B-29's, and at a certain point the formation was attacked by Raidens. I and my wingmen managed to dispatch them, the bombers took no damage, but in the process I got clipped. Took at least one round in my oil tank. The aircraft was responding fine, the engine was still at full power, but well we all know that wasn't going to last. I did the typical gaming thing, dove down and strafed the nearest airbase, then landed in the countryside. After that though, I got the thought of what it would have been like to have been in a situation like that in reality. In an aircraft that is going to fail on you, soon, over hostile territory, with safety a thousand miles away. The thoughts that would be going through you head at that point are hard to imagine. In reality I guess the plan would have been to fly out to sea as far as possible, ditch and hope to be picked up by friendly forces, but even that would have been pretty long odds when your life was at stake. Just gives a bit of insight into what war really is, what the people who were there, and are there now really have to face, the price that has to be paid.

Oh well that's pretty much the point of this topic, share stories, insights into what it was really like to have been there, either stories of those who actually were, or just things you've learned and thought about through the game.

Tully__
12-09-2004, 12:34 AM
I believe there were often submarines stationed ahead of time for a big raid to pick up pilots in exactly these circumstances. Not sure if the pilots had target zones to try for or if the subs simply searched areas where pilots were reported to have ditched or bailed though.

falcon_ba
12-09-2004, 05:02 AM
Or read the story what has happend for real! (http://www.flightjournal.com/fj/articles/mad-rebel/mad-rebel1.asp)

Texas LongHorn
12-09-2004, 08:56 AM
Tully is exactly right. Especially towards the end of the war the US Fleet submarines did superb duty in picking up fliers shot down over water. If your radio still worked after getting hit, and you could manage to get into your liferaft, you stood a pretty fair chance of getting picked up by either Sub or PBY. While the IJN just didn't have the resources, the US Navy placed an EXTREMELY high priority in rescuing downed pilots. I've read accounts of Sub Skippers taking the boats close inshore to Japanese held islands to rescue fliers while under shore fire, pretty amazing stuff. All the best, LongHorn

Freycinet
12-09-2004, 11:25 AM
hey, you wouldn't have had a President Bush I if the subs hadn't been there to pick him up...

Fliger747
12-09-2004, 11:37 AM
The air sea rescue operation was a big morale booster. The agreed on value for a naval Aviator (determined in a free market) was 5 gal of icecream... As subs in late war had more or less run out of 'targets', plane guard duty was a big priority.

Note that the oil tank in a F6F had a standpipe, such that even if holed, one would not run out of oil, though temperature of the remaining oil would have to be watched carefully. The F4U had twin oil coolers, with a check valve system to prevent oil loss and permit continued operation if one was hit.