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ARandomKid
03-08-2010, 04:13 PM
http://bay12games.com/dwarves/dev_now.html


That is all. The guy lives off of what people donate to him, and he gets roughly $2000-3000 a month even in a dry spell like this where he hasn't released a new version of his game for over a year.

An example of bad communication:

- Server goes down, people are unable to play a much loved game.
- 5 days later, not so much as even a peep saying "yea, we know it's not working smoothly, it will probably be down intermittently for *estimated number of days*. Bear with us, please"

AJ_Rimmer_Bsc
03-08-2010, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by ARandomKid:
http://bay12games.com/dwarves/dev_now.html


That is all. The guy lives off of what people donate to him, and he gets roughly $2000-3000 a month even in a dry spell like this where he hasn't released a new version of his game for over a year.


If Ubisoft adopted a gameplan like this for communicating things and the resolution of those things if they are problems, I would probably even go so far as to *gasp* support the DRM. (and indeed, the first commercial big shot company I spot doing this I can guarantee you they are going places)

now dont take this the wrong way...

but your comparison is the same as comparing macdonalds to the guy who sells burgers down the corner of the street.

ask the guy selling his burgers to supply the menu from macdonalds,and see what he says.

ARandomKid
03-08-2010, 04:23 PM
Originally posted by AJ_Rimmer_Bsc:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ARandomKid:
http://bay12games.com/dwarves/dev_now.html


That is all. The guy lives off of what people donate to him, and he gets roughly $2000-3000 a month even in a dry spell like this where he hasn't released a new version of his game for over a year.


If Ubisoft adopted a gameplan like this for communicating things and the resolution of those things if they are problems, I would probably even go so far as to *gasp* support the DRM. (and indeed, the first commercial big shot company I spot doing this I can guarantee you they are going places)

now dont take this the wrong way...

but your comparison is the same as comparing macdonalds to the guy who sells burgers down the corner of the street.

ask the guy selling his burgers to supply the menu from macdonalds,and see what he says. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Point taken. All I am saying is that he knows how to communicate to his customers (those who donate money). He might not have the most appealing game graphics-wise or anything-wise except perhaps playability once you grow accustomed to the controls, but I'll be damned if he doesn't have the full-on support of whomever donates that $5000 he got in November or whatever. He could say "Well, sorry, but I can't work on this for a good month due to other issues." and they would respond "That's cool, have some money to keep yourself alive while we wait."


I admit, we can't actually judge something like that abstractly, but the feeling I get from the community on the forums is that they support him through thick and thin, primarily because of the high communication.

Whereas with UBI, when they unveiled their DRM, they lost a good chunk of their market.

AJ_Rimmer_Bsc
03-08-2010, 04:38 PM
Originally posted by ARandomKid:

Point taken. All I am saying is that he knows how to communicate to his customers (those who donate money). He might not have the most appealing game graphics-wise or anything-wise except perhaps playability once you grow accustomed to the controls, but I'll be damned if he doesn't have the full-on support of whomever donates that $5000 he got in November or whatever. He could say "Well, sorry, but I can't work on this for a good month due to other issues." and they would respond "That's cool, have some money to keep yourself alive while we wait."


I admit, we can't actually judge something like that abstractly, but the feeling I get from the community on the forums is that they support him through thick and thin, primarily because of the high communication.

Whereas with UBI, when they unveiled their DRM, they lost a good chunk of their market.

its the curse of the growth.

the bigger the company,the less they will update or even bother to inform the customers about things.

with a small company,the staff themselves can reply on forums or send pm`s etc,but with a company this large,the staff are already working like dogs on AC3.

you might have a few working on bugs,and others working on server issues,and even some reading the tech forum for mass problems,not small ones,but the big ones.

the days of dev vs customer interaction are long gone,the best you can hope is people post the problems in the tech section,and theres so many of them the problem gets bumped to the top of a long list.

caswallawn_2k7
03-08-2010, 04:41 PM
he may give good feedback but the game isn't exactly a top end title and basically is lucky because it has a following of people stupid enough to keep paying for something that in the end isn't worth the money.

seriously he is getting about 20-30k a year to make a game that, lets be honest if a main stream studio released for even as little as say $10 people would complain.

the simple point is there is a lot to be said for gullible people and some1 who knows how to talk people into parting with their money for something that is quite simple and about as user friendly as a porcupine used as a pillow.

ARandomKid
03-08-2010, 05:11 PM
Originally posted by caswallawn_2k7:
he may give good feedback but the game isn't exactly a top end title and basically is lucky because it has a following of people stupid enough to keep paying for something that in the end isn't worth the money.

seriously he is getting about 20-30k a year to make a game that, lets be honest if a main stream studio released for even as little as say $10 people would complain.

the simple point is there is a lot to be said for gullible people and some1 who knows how to talk people into parting with their money for something that is quite simple and about as user friendly as a porcupine used as a pillow.

And yet the long-time users who stuck it out are with him completely instead of, as your model suggests, having ditched him because his game was "a lame user-unfriendly" one.

I do concede that if mainstream studios released something like that you would hear complaints out the wazoo because of the strict learning curve being the basis behind the game's motto "Losing is Fun".

The game certainly isn't meant for people grown up on and used to ACII-type or FPS games, using keyboard+mouse and a concept not at all hard to grasp, that being primarily "shoot things and they die. Repeat."

Once you get past the obscene learning curve (not necessarily "difficult" so much as you need to play the game and lose a LOT before you realize what you need to do) the game becomes more enjoyable due to its zany nature, with the ability to chuck your enemies headfirst off a ten story cliff into a pool of magma being a rather basic thing to accomplish.