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View Full Version : Guys who survived falling from doomed planes with no chutes...story's here.



Mysticpuma2003
03-24-2005, 09:26 AM
I was amazed by some of the luck these people had, hope you are too! If ever their was such a thing as a guardian angel, they were flying with these people.

http://www.greenharbor.com/fffolder/ffallers.html

Mysticpuma2003
03-24-2005, 09:26 AM
I was amazed by some of the luck these people had, hope you are too! If ever their was such a thing as a guardian angel, they were flying with these people.

http://www.greenharbor.com/fffolder/ffallers.html

B16Enk
03-24-2005, 09:58 AM
Nicholas Alkemade (the Lanc rear gunner) had a hard time convincing the Gestapo that he wasn't a spy and had indeed survived the 5,500M fall.

J_Weaver
03-24-2005, 10:09 AM
Wow! Great stories!

Messaschnitzel
03-24-2005, 11:46 AM
Falling from those heights would give plenty of time to review one's life on the way down. I imagine that once someone survives that sort of incident, everything else that happens in their life will be appreciated. I think that if I was in that situation, my thought would be "oh, wonderful. I just soiled myself." http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

geetarman
03-24-2005, 11:58 AM
Wow! What timing! Just a few days ago I was remebering an account I read as a boy in a paperback called "Strange But True" about a British airman who bailed out of his plane without a chute at high alt. and lived. Lo and behold, there it is! Thanks!

BRASSTURTLE
03-24-2005, 11:59 AM
Puma, I love the Robert JOhnson skin in you sig. Would you be so kind as to tell me whre i might find it? I have been wanting one since i read Thunderbolt! last month.

Thanks
Turtle

ploughman
03-24-2005, 12:09 PM
There was a programme on here in the UK called Bomber Pilot in which grandchildren of Bomber Command crew members formed a bomber crew and trained on B-17s and a Lanc. The pilot actually got to fly the Canadian Lancaster as well as the Sally B! But...one of the young people on the show was the grandchild of that Lanc rear gunner!

CWH1089
03-24-2005, 01:03 PM
i remember reading a story a while back in one of my magazines about a british lancaster tail gunner flying a night mission. he was forced to bail out when hit by enemy fire. as he exited the aircraft, his parachute came off. he fell several thousand feet before he happened to smack into one of his fellow crewmembers who was floating down in a parachute! he held on for dear life until they finally made it down safely. amazing stuff! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

ploughman
03-24-2005, 01:19 PM
NO WAY! What are the chances of that?

Aaron_GT
03-24-2005, 03:08 PM
An uncle of mine was in the RAF medical corps during the 1960s, and one of the people he treated was an RAF flight instructor who had broken just about every bone in his body and was under my uncle's care for about a year.

He had apparently taken up a pilot after a bit too much to drink the night before and fancied a bit of a kip. So he asked the trainee to do only gentle manoevers and eased back into the seat in the Hunter trainer and undid his harness for a bit of extra comfort. A few minutes later the trainee decided to show off and did some sort of aerobatics involving going inverted (I can't remember what he did exactly). The instructor fell through the canopy, out into the fresh air, and then back into the plane (which had moved in the meantime!) head first.

He lived, but my uncle said that as soon as he was well enough to be discharged from hospital the RAF prompty court martialed him and threw him out of the RAF.

Endrju
03-24-2005, 03:35 PM
Great stories, a man free falling in the air flies at some 200 km/h.

Arcadeace_
03-24-2005, 03:42 PM
Thanks for posting http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif I suspected some survived at great heights but never knew.


http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Messaschnitzel:
I think that if I was in that situation, my thought would be "oh, wonderful. I just soiled myself." http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Amon26
03-24-2005, 03:53 PM
Incredible stuff! I'd always imagined a height like that would liquify someone on impact. The one that gets me is the guy who fell into the train depot. Imagine the reaction by those who witnessed it.

LStarosta
03-24-2005, 04:38 PM
People tend to forget a little thing called terminal velocity...

Owlsphone
03-24-2005, 09:29 PM
The best one found on the page is the last one coincidentally:
"In November of 1997, R.C. Sharma, the director of the Indian Central Bureau of Investigation was seriously injured when he fell while waving from the door of an Indian Airlines plane at Borjhar Airport. However it should be noted that the plane was on the ground at the time."

If he had died, I am sure he would be nominated for a Darwin Award. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

JV44Rall
03-24-2005, 09:53 PM
In the book Death Traps, Belton Cooper writes about being in a tank recovery team in France and Germany. (Death Traps was their nickname for Shermans - the Wehrmacht chewed them up pretty badly. Cooper hints that US war planners' conduct was almost criminal in putting Shermans on the front line.)

In late '44, his unit was positioned in a quarry when a formation of B-17s were attacked overhead by the LW. One of the fortresses exploded and they watched as the little pieces falling towards them became big pieces like the wings. and fuselage sections. The tail landed not far from their position, and Cooper and others went to investigate.

Inside was the tail gunner, still alive! When the plane exploded, he was unable to get out and was trapped in the tail. IIRC, Cooper said the tail gunner survived.

Mr.Spot
03-24-2005, 10:24 PM
"No one was onboard for Fleming to scream apologies; there was no one to hear him. He outlived any of his crew, for from 16,00 feet the wireless operator falling at 120 MPH (the terminal velocity for his body weight) reached the ground ninety seconds later. He made an indentation 12 inches deep. This represented a deceleration equivalent to 450 times the force of gravity. He split open like a slaughtered pig and died instantly. Fleming, still strapped into the pilot's seat and aghast at his incontinence, hit the earth (along with the front of the fuselage, two Rolls Royce engines and most of the main spar) some four minutes after that. To him it seemed like four hours." - Len Deighton

Woof!

Aaron_GT
03-25-2005, 12:43 AM
"Inside was the tail gunner, still alive! When the plane exploded, he was unable to get out and was trapped in the tail. IIRC, Cooper said the tail gunner survived.
"

There was reputedly a case in which a similar thing happened with a Lancaster tail unit, but the tail unit partly 'flew' down in some fashion.

Also in more recent times (the 1970s anyway) an airliner broke up at about 30,000 feet and a stewardess fell out and survived after landing in a field (maybe it was a soft field). This is from memory, so I may have some of the details wrong. If I remember correctly, though, she was of Eastern European or Balkan extraction.

F19_Orheim
03-25-2005, 12:48 AM
Nicholas Alkemade's story is a great one.... I remember seeing a documentary series back in the 80ies , a production by the French Tv5. One episode was about the WW2, where they interviwed a bunch of famous aces, Gabresky, Sakai, Closterman etc etc. They also picked up Nicholas Alkemade and went to the forests outside Berlin, where he stood lokking at them and said "well, beeing here again I can see that it is difficult to miss the trees"...... "I had splinters enough in my body to start a bonfire, many broken ribs, but I was alive and walked away..." "The branches of the pines worked as trampolines and slowed down my fall and I was lucky enough to end up in a huge drift of snow".. Excellent TV series, hope to see it again someday.

F19_Ob
03-25-2005, 08:54 AM
A Finnish Morane-Saulnier 406 pilot bailed from about 2600 feet from his burning plane but his parachute tore appart and he fell like a rock.
The lines of the chute caught the top branches of a fir tree as he rocketed by and declererated and halted his descent by flexing and then slingshot him back up to the treetops, where he succeded to grab hold.
His most frightening recolection was climbing down the tree.
His fellowpilots saw him bail and fall and thought he died. So there was a happy reunion when he later called and was picked up.


this episode is also mentioned in Ilmari juutilainens (Finnish ace) book "double fighter knight"
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

JG301_nils
03-26-2005, 12:49 AM
Also some girls have survived free faling from planes. One I remember was the Yugoslavian stewardess in late ´60s or early ´70s that fell 9.000 meters with the tail section from a DC-9 and survived. I cannot remember the details anymore.
Another story I saw in TV some years ago, was a german girl that fell from a plane that disintegrated in the air over South America´s jungle. As the sole survivor, still strapped in her seat with two other dead passengers, she fell down in the jungle there. Badly beaten, she still manged to move and after several days following a river she reached a indian village.
I believe her father had been a missionaire in the jungle and as she grew up there too, she had learned of the dangers there and that´s what helped her understand where to find people and reach for help.

mortoma
03-26-2005, 01:23 AM
There was a skydiver at the Frankfort, Indiana airport who jumped but his chute didn't open, from about 10,000 feet. I forget which, but he either landed on flat on his stomach or flat on his back in soft mud and he survived, nearly fully recovered later and leads a normal life. I used to live close to there and have landed aircraft there before. Practiced some of my more challenging cross wind landings there ( gusty, 17 knot winds ) during my PPL training.