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AlmightyTallest
11-16-2004, 04:30 PM
Source: Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War by: Rene J. Francillon

Page 129-134

When in June 1944 the USAAF began daylight bombing operations against Japan, the Japanese Army found themselves without an adequate high-altitude interceptor capable of successfully
engaging the B-29's at their cruising altitude of 30,000 ft. This situation had been foreseen
but, even in their most confident estimates, the Koku Hombu could not hope to have the
specialized interceptor aircraft then under development in service much before the late summer of 1945. As a stopgap the Army had planned to use the Ki-61-II KAI which had begun flight trials two months before. However, teething troubles with the aircraft's Ha-140 engine frustrated this plan, and proven and reliable Ki-61-II KAI airframes were left unused at the Kagamigahara plant while the fighter Sentais had to defend the homeland with older aircraft.

Time was of the essence and a solution had to be found to provide an alternate powerplant for
the Ki-61-II KAI and for the rapid supply of a new type of interceptor fighter to the Army.
Consequently, in November 1944, the Ministry of Munitions instruced Kawasaki to install a different engine in the Ki-61-II KAI.By the end of 1944 the factories producting engines with sufficiently small diameter to be mounted in a fighter aircraft already had their production facilities overtaxed by the pressing demands resulting from the war situation, and Kawasaki engineers had to find a suitable type of engine among those then manufactured for bomber aircraft. It soon appeared that the only powerplant combining availability and reliability with a suitable output was the 1,500 hp Mitsubishi Ha-112-II fourteen-cylinder double low radial. As this engine has a diameter of 1.22m (4ft) it appeared at first difficult to install it in the Ki-61-II KAI
airframe with its fuselage width of only 0.84m (2ft 9 1/16 in). However, the Kawasaki engineers were able to study the engine mounting of an imported Focke-Wulf Fw-190A, an
aircraft in which a radial engine had been successfully fitted to a slim fuselage, and to call on the experience of the Imperial Japanese Navy which had fitted the same Mitsubishi Ha-112-II to the Aichi-built D4Y3, earlier versions of this aircraft also being powered by an inverted-vee liquid cooled engine. Work began immediately on the experimental modification of three Ki-61-II KAIs and the first aircraft, designated Ki-100, made its first flight on 1 February 1945.

Compared with it's forerunner the Ki-100 was lighter- empty and loaded weight being respectively reduced by 315 kg and 285 kg to 2,525 kg and 3,495 kg (694 lb and 628 lb to 5,567 lb and 7,705 lb)- and manoeuvrability and handling characteristics were markedly improved due to the lower wing and power loadings. Even though the engines of the Ki-61-II KAI reached
it's calcuated performance only now and then as its engine was tempermental, the Ki-100
benefited from the high reliability of it's engine. Accelerated flight tests taking place in February 1945 revealed that the airvcraft performed even better than anticipated and a fourth Ki-61-II KAI was modified the same month to full production standard as Army Type 5 Fighter Model 1A (Ki-100-1a). Two hundread and seventy-one Ki-61-II KAI airframes were similarly converted at the Kagamigahara plant between March and June 1945 and were immediately delivered to Service units in Japan. Under combat conditions the Ki-100-Ia proved itself to be an outstanding fighter, equally suited to intercepting high-flying B-29's and to engaging the Grumman F6F Hellcats of the US Navy which were now frequently operating in the Japanese sky. To the allies the aircraft was a complete and unpleasant surprise, and it's Nipponese pilots joined their ground crews in hailing the Ki-100 as the best and most reliable operational fighter of the Imperial Japanese Army. The aircraft was easy to handle and gave a fighting chance even to the youngest pilots who often had less than 100 hours of flight training prior to joining their operational units.

As soon as flight trials had shown that the development of the Ki-100-Ia was a success, Kawasaki began preparations to produce two new versions. Characterized by an all-round-vision
canopy similar to that planned for the Ki-61-III and tested on a Ki-61-II KAI, the Ki-100-Ib was no longer a conversion from existing airframes but was built to the new standard from the start. The first Ki-100-Ibs were built at the Kagamigahara and Ichinomiya factories in May 1945 but production was hampered by Allied bombings, the Ichinomiya plant being forced to cease production in July 1945 and the Kagamigahara production being considerably showed down. When Japan surrendered only 106 Ki-100-Ibs had been built at Kagamigahara and the Ichinomiya plant had delivered only twelve aircraft of this version. In an attempt to further improve the performance of the aircraft at altitude, in March 1945 Kawasaki began the development of the Ki-100-II powered by a 1,500 hp Mitsubishi Ha-112-II Ru with Ru-102 turbosupercharger and water-methanol injection. Due to the lack of internal space the turbosupersharger was fitted beneath the fuselage without provision for an intercooler and air was ducted directly from the compressor to the carburettor. The installation of the turbosupercharger necessitated the relocation of some of the fuel lines and the ventral air scoop was offset to starboard while an additional intake was mounted in the port wing root.

The first Ki-100-II flew in May 1945 and within a month was joined on the flight trials by two additional prototypes. Compared with the Ki-100-I, the Ki-100-II was slightyl heavier and consequently suffered a performance penalty below 8,000m (26,250 ft). Despite the lack of intercooler preventing full advantage being gained from the installation of a turbosupercharger, the Ki-100-II had better performance than the Ki-100-1 above 8,000m (26,250ft) and its maximum speed of 590 km/h (367mph) was reached at 10,000m (32,810 ft), the cruising altitude of the B-29's during daylight operations. It was planned to begin producton of the Ki-100-II in September 1945 but the war ended before implementation of this schedule.

It was fitting that the last operational fighter of the IJA made the last flight for that Service when two Ki-100-Ibs of the 111th Sentai were ferried between Komachi and Yokosuka where they were shipped to the USA for evaluation.

Units Allocated:
5th,17th,18th,59th,111th, and 244th Sentais

Description: Single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber. All metal construction with fabric-covered control surfaces.

Powerplant: One Army Type 4 fourteen cylinder air cooled radial (Mitsubishi Ha-33) 62 or Ha-112-II rated at 1,500hp for take off, 1350hp at 2,000m (6,560 ft) and 1250 hp at 5,800m (19,030 ft), driving a constant-speed three-blade metal propeller (Ki-100-I).

Armament: Two fuselage mounted 20mm Ho-5 cannon and two wing mounted 12.7mm Type I (Ho-103) machine guns.

External stores: two 200 litre (44 Imp gal.) drop tanks, or two 250kg (551 lb) bombs.

Weights:
Empty: 2,525 kg (5,567 lb)
Loaded: 3,495 kg (7,705 lb)

Wing Loading: 174.8 kg/sq meter (35.8 lb/sq ft)
Power Loading: 2.33kg/hp (5.1 lb/hp)

Performance: Maximum speed: 580km/h at 6,000m (360 mph at 19,685 ft)
535km/h at 10,000m (332 mph at 32,810 ft)

Cruising Speed: 400 km/h at 4,000m (249 mph at 13,125 ft)

Climb to 5,000m (16,405 ft) in 6 minutes

to 10,000m (32,810 ft) in 20 min

Service Ceiling: 11,000m (36,090 ft)
Range-normal: 1,400km (870 miles)
-maximum: 2,200km (1,367 miles)


Production: A total of 396 Ki-100's, including 275 Ki-61-II KAI conversions, were built by

Kawasaki Kokuki Kogyo K.K. as follows:

Kagamigahara plant:

3 Ki-100 prototypes (Feb 1945)
272 Ki-100-Ia production aircraft (Feb-June 1945)
106 Ki-100-Ib production aircraft (May-Aug 1945)
3 Ki-100-II prototypes (May-June 1945)

Total: 384

Ichinomiya plant: 12 Ki-100-Ib production aircraft (May-July 1945)



End of book quote-----------------------

These planes were RARE going by the numbers!! I have no complaints if Oleg decides to put
them in PF, but I do hope that they have flight performance that is properly modelled by available sources.

Apparently the US tested them, therefore there should be a publically available report on the exact handling characteristics of this aircraft available. Can anyone find and post this report here, or send it to Oleg and his team for review?

Just going by the numbers of Ki-100's produced, and how late they were in the war
I can't see a reason the F4U-4 couldn't be included in the sim as well. The F4U-4B model alone with 20mm cannons was produced in similar numbers to the entire production line of Ki-100-Ia's and b's, with a listed number of 297 F4U-4B's plus the 200 F4U-1C's already in PF.

Certainly doesn't hurt to have more aircraft to choose from and fight against in PF, I just hope that the performance of all of these aircraft can be modelled as accurately as possible using real world flight test data. The Ki-100 sounds like a great plane to be included in PF, hoping to see more aircraft for both sides in the future http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

here's a source :

http://home.iae.nl/users/wbergmns/info/f4u.htm

From above:

F4U-4
The first F4U-4 was delivered to the US Navy on 31 October 1944. The F4U-4 was powered by C-series Double Wasp engine. The installed model was the R-2800-18W, later replaced by the
R-2800-42W. It had a war emergency power of 2760hp. A four-bladed propeller replaced the
three-bladed one of the F4U-1. A chin scoop was added to the underside of the engine cowling.
The F4U-4 could reach a speed of 726km/h.
During the F4U-4 production, the cockpit was redesigned again. It now incorporated a flat,
bullet-proof windscreen, a revised canopy, an armoured seat, and an improved instrument panel.
Production included 2050 F4U-4s with six .50 guns, 297 F4U-4Bs or F4U-4Cs with four 20mm
cannon, a single F4U-4N nightfighter conversion and nine F4U- 4P reconnaissance modifications.
The last one was delivered in August 1947. Plans to produce the F4U-4 by Goodyear as the FG-4 were abandoned.

The F4U-4 arrived late in WWII, and served only during the last four months of the conflict.

The war of the F4U-4 was the Korean war. Here the type served mainly as a fighter-bomber, but

nevertheless one pilot, Capt. J. Folmar of VMA-312, was credited with shooting down a MiG-15.

AlmightyTallest
11-16-2004, 04:30 PM
Source: Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War by: Rene J. Francillon

Page 129-134

When in June 1944 the USAAF began daylight bombing operations against Japan, the Japanese Army found themselves without an adequate high-altitude interceptor capable of successfully
engaging the B-29's at their cruising altitude of 30,000 ft. This situation had been foreseen
but, even in their most confident estimates, the Koku Hombu could not hope to have the
specialized interceptor aircraft then under development in service much before the late summer of 1945. As a stopgap the Army had planned to use the Ki-61-II KAI which had begun flight trials two months before. However, teething troubles with the aircraft's Ha-140 engine frustrated this plan, and proven and reliable Ki-61-II KAI airframes were left unused at the Kagamigahara plant while the fighter Sentais had to defend the homeland with older aircraft.

Time was of the essence and a solution had to be found to provide an alternate powerplant for
the Ki-61-II KAI and for the rapid supply of a new type of interceptor fighter to the Army.
Consequently, in November 1944, the Ministry of Munitions instruced Kawasaki to install a different engine in the Ki-61-II KAI.By the end of 1944 the factories producting engines with sufficiently small diameter to be mounted in a fighter aircraft already had their production facilities overtaxed by the pressing demands resulting from the war situation, and Kawasaki engineers had to find a suitable type of engine among those then manufactured for bomber aircraft. It soon appeared that the only powerplant combining availability and reliability with a suitable output was the 1,500 hp Mitsubishi Ha-112-II fourteen-cylinder double low radial. As this engine has a diameter of 1.22m (4ft) it appeared at first difficult to install it in the Ki-61-II KAI
airframe with its fuselage width of only 0.84m (2ft 9 1/16 in). However, the Kawasaki engineers were able to study the engine mounting of an imported Focke-Wulf Fw-190A, an
aircraft in which a radial engine had been successfully fitted to a slim fuselage, and to call on the experience of the Imperial Japanese Navy which had fitted the same Mitsubishi Ha-112-II to the Aichi-built D4Y3, earlier versions of this aircraft also being powered by an inverted-vee liquid cooled engine. Work began immediately on the experimental modification of three Ki-61-II KAIs and the first aircraft, designated Ki-100, made its first flight on 1 February 1945.

Compared with it's forerunner the Ki-100 was lighter- empty and loaded weight being respectively reduced by 315 kg and 285 kg to 2,525 kg and 3,495 kg (694 lb and 628 lb to 5,567 lb and 7,705 lb)- and manoeuvrability and handling characteristics were markedly improved due to the lower wing and power loadings. Even though the engines of the Ki-61-II KAI reached
it's calcuated performance only now and then as its engine was tempermental, the Ki-100
benefited from the high reliability of it's engine. Accelerated flight tests taking place in February 1945 revealed that the airvcraft performed even better than anticipated and a fourth Ki-61-II KAI was modified the same month to full production standard as Army Type 5 Fighter Model 1A (Ki-100-1a). Two hundread and seventy-one Ki-61-II KAI airframes were similarly converted at the Kagamigahara plant between March and June 1945 and were immediately delivered to Service units in Japan. Under combat conditions the Ki-100-Ia proved itself to be an outstanding fighter, equally suited to intercepting high-flying B-29's and to engaging the Grumman F6F Hellcats of the US Navy which were now frequently operating in the Japanese sky. To the allies the aircraft was a complete and unpleasant surprise, and it's Nipponese pilots joined their ground crews in hailing the Ki-100 as the best and most reliable operational fighter of the Imperial Japanese Army. The aircraft was easy to handle and gave a fighting chance even to the youngest pilots who often had less than 100 hours of flight training prior to joining their operational units.

As soon as flight trials had shown that the development of the Ki-100-Ia was a success, Kawasaki began preparations to produce two new versions. Characterized by an all-round-vision
canopy similar to that planned for the Ki-61-III and tested on a Ki-61-II KAI, the Ki-100-Ib was no longer a conversion from existing airframes but was built to the new standard from the start. The first Ki-100-Ibs were built at the Kagamigahara and Ichinomiya factories in May 1945 but production was hampered by Allied bombings, the Ichinomiya plant being forced to cease production in July 1945 and the Kagamigahara production being considerably showed down. When Japan surrendered only 106 Ki-100-Ibs had been built at Kagamigahara and the Ichinomiya plant had delivered only twelve aircraft of this version. In an attempt to further improve the performance of the aircraft at altitude, in March 1945 Kawasaki began the development of the Ki-100-II powered by a 1,500 hp Mitsubishi Ha-112-II Ru with Ru-102 turbosupercharger and water-methanol injection. Due to the lack of internal space the turbosupersharger was fitted beneath the fuselage without provision for an intercooler and air was ducted directly from the compressor to the carburettor. The installation of the turbosupercharger necessitated the relocation of some of the fuel lines and the ventral air scoop was offset to starboard while an additional intake was mounted in the port wing root.

The first Ki-100-II flew in May 1945 and within a month was joined on the flight trials by two additional prototypes. Compared with the Ki-100-I, the Ki-100-II was slightyl heavier and consequently suffered a performance penalty below 8,000m (26,250 ft). Despite the lack of intercooler preventing full advantage being gained from the installation of a turbosupercharger, the Ki-100-II had better performance than the Ki-100-1 above 8,000m (26,250ft) and its maximum speed of 590 km/h (367mph) was reached at 10,000m (32,810 ft), the cruising altitude of the B-29's during daylight operations. It was planned to begin producton of the Ki-100-II in September 1945 but the war ended before implementation of this schedule.

It was fitting that the last operational fighter of the IJA made the last flight for that Service when two Ki-100-Ibs of the 111th Sentai were ferried between Komachi and Yokosuka where they were shipped to the USA for evaluation.

Units Allocated:
5th,17th,18th,59th,111th, and 244th Sentais

Description: Single-seat fighter and fighter-bomber. All metal construction with fabric-covered control surfaces.

Powerplant: One Army Type 4 fourteen cylinder air cooled radial (Mitsubishi Ha-33) 62 or Ha-112-II rated at 1,500hp for take off, 1350hp at 2,000m (6,560 ft) and 1250 hp at 5,800m (19,030 ft), driving a constant-speed three-blade metal propeller (Ki-100-I).

Armament: Two fuselage mounted 20mm Ho-5 cannon and two wing mounted 12.7mm Type I (Ho-103) machine guns.

External stores: two 200 litre (44 Imp gal.) drop tanks, or two 250kg (551 lb) bombs.

Weights:
Empty: 2,525 kg (5,567 lb)
Loaded: 3,495 kg (7,705 lb)

Wing Loading: 174.8 kg/sq meter (35.8 lb/sq ft)
Power Loading: 2.33kg/hp (5.1 lb/hp)

Performance: Maximum speed: 580km/h at 6,000m (360 mph at 19,685 ft)
535km/h at 10,000m (332 mph at 32,810 ft)

Cruising Speed: 400 km/h at 4,000m (249 mph at 13,125 ft)

Climb to 5,000m (16,405 ft) in 6 minutes

to 10,000m (32,810 ft) in 20 min

Service Ceiling: 11,000m (36,090 ft)
Range-normal: 1,400km (870 miles)
-maximum: 2,200km (1,367 miles)


Production: A total of 396 Ki-100's, including 275 Ki-61-II KAI conversions, were built by

Kawasaki Kokuki Kogyo K.K. as follows:

Kagamigahara plant:

3 Ki-100 prototypes (Feb 1945)
272 Ki-100-Ia production aircraft (Feb-June 1945)
106 Ki-100-Ib production aircraft (May-Aug 1945)
3 Ki-100-II prototypes (May-June 1945)

Total: 384

Ichinomiya plant: 12 Ki-100-Ib production aircraft (May-July 1945)



End of book quote-----------------------

These planes were RARE going by the numbers!! I have no complaints if Oleg decides to put
them in PF, but I do hope that they have flight performance that is properly modelled by available sources.

Apparently the US tested them, therefore there should be a publically available report on the exact handling characteristics of this aircraft available. Can anyone find and post this report here, or send it to Oleg and his team for review?

Just going by the numbers of Ki-100's produced, and how late they were in the war
I can't see a reason the F4U-4 couldn't be included in the sim as well. The F4U-4B model alone with 20mm cannons was produced in similar numbers to the entire production line of Ki-100-Ia's and b's, with a listed number of 297 F4U-4B's plus the 200 F4U-1C's already in PF.

Certainly doesn't hurt to have more aircraft to choose from and fight against in PF, I just hope that the performance of all of these aircraft can be modelled as accurately as possible using real world flight test data. The Ki-100 sounds like a great plane to be included in PF, hoping to see more aircraft for both sides in the future http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

here's a source :

http://home.iae.nl/users/wbergmns/info/f4u.htm

From above:

F4U-4
The first F4U-4 was delivered to the US Navy on 31 October 1944. The F4U-4 was powered by C-series Double Wasp engine. The installed model was the R-2800-18W, later replaced by the
R-2800-42W. It had a war emergency power of 2760hp. A four-bladed propeller replaced the
three-bladed one of the F4U-1. A chin scoop was added to the underside of the engine cowling.
The F4U-4 could reach a speed of 726km/h.
During the F4U-4 production, the cockpit was redesigned again. It now incorporated a flat,
bullet-proof windscreen, a revised canopy, an armoured seat, and an improved instrument panel.
Production included 2050 F4U-4s with six .50 guns, 297 F4U-4Bs or F4U-4Cs with four 20mm
cannon, a single F4U-4N nightfighter conversion and nine F4U- 4P reconnaissance modifications.
The last one was delivered in August 1947. Plans to produce the F4U-4 by Goodyear as the FG-4 were abandoned.

The F4U-4 arrived late in WWII, and served only during the last four months of the conflict.

The war of the F4U-4 was the Korean war. Here the type served mainly as a fighter-bomber, but

nevertheless one pilot, Capt. J. Folmar of VMA-312, was credited with shooting down a MiG-15.

LuftKuhMist
11-16-2004, 08:11 PM
Already scared by the Ki100?


Japan had a plethoria of great fighters, thing is that their manufacturing quality was awful and the fuel was barely available.

LEXX_Luthor
11-16-2004, 09:26 PM
They are Panicking

Remember the Whinnig when TB~3 + I~16 parasite Zveno or Stack was first announced, they didn't know what that was, some 1946 rocket or something, and they Panicked.


But I agree, we need more Japanese Flyable types for Balance. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

VW-IceFire
11-16-2004, 09:28 PM
Why is everyone so scared of the Ki-100? Its the rough equivalent of a F6F-3 as I see it.

Its good for variety...and the Japanese side needs some variety http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

LEXX_Luthor
11-16-2004, 09:34 PM
If we had a Flyable P~100 there would be Panick too, from who I don't know lol.

RedDeth
11-16-2004, 09:37 PM
please read terms of use more in depth

ElAurens
11-16-2004, 09:59 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RedDeth:
need more slant eye planes for balance. be sure. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

"slant eye" planes?

Sounds like you need a little vacation from these boards to think about what you just typed.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

k5054
11-17-2004, 12:54 AM
360mph? This is about as terrifying as a P-40F, which had 364mph at 20,000ft in 1942. Give us a break from the Ki-100 over hyping willya?

Korolov
11-17-2004, 01:39 AM
Maneuvering ability, altitude performance and climb rate. So there. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

k5054
11-17-2004, 03:13 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Maneuvering ability, altitude performance and climb rate. So there <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

None of which would match a Spit 9 of June 1942, or probably a 109G-2, same timeframe.

This is a fighter which first saw combat in May 45? Contemporary with P-47M/N, Spit 21, 190D-13, F4U-4. There just is no way a properly modelled Ki-100 can do well in a 1945 plane set.

falco_cz
11-17-2004, 05:12 AM
I agree with k5054. '45 plane with '42 performance, Ki84 will still be the king http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

VW-IceFire
11-17-2004, 06:47 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by k5054:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Maneuvering ability, altitude performance and climb rate. So there <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

None of which would match a Spit 9 of June 1942, or probably a 109G-2, same timeframe.

This is a fighter which first saw combat in May 45? Contemporary with P-47M/N, Spit 21, 190D-13, F4U-4. There just is no way a properly modelled Ki-100 can do well in a 1945 plane set. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>
You're absolutely right...which has a bunch of us scratching our heads in wonder. The Ki-100 is a great plane for adding variety to the flyables list and it should be a good plane for manuverability but its not exceptionally fast.

LEXX_Luthor
11-17-2004, 08:57 AM
So, basically a Yak~3

Luftcaca
11-17-2004, 09:23 AM
yeah, the Ki-100 was a great plane but like most of the other great fighters from Japan during this era it had some inherant weaknesses...

Like the Zero it was slower than most of its opponent of the same era (late 44 - 45) and it prolly could take a lot less punishement than most of USA planes except the P-51. but 1 on 1 it would be suicide to engage the Ki-100 unless you have a clear advantage to begin the fight with

but heh, GREAT addition to the game, I would even say essential...now I just cant wait to fly the George...

F19_Olli72
11-17-2004, 09:52 AM
Always fun to read these kind of threads prior to a new aircraft beeing released. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Either its "uber" or cr@p. Either way we get another japanese plane for variation, and that imo cant be bad.

Figures and numbers isnt everything, it all comes down to the situation. But personally ive read that the Ki100 pilots considered Hellcats relatively easy kills. And indeed an encounter between Ki100s and Hellcats over Okinawa ended with 14 Hellcats shot down with no losses for the japanese.

Not too shabby for a "'45 plane with '42 performance".

goshikisen
11-17-2004, 09:54 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by k5054:
360mph? This is about as terrifying as a P-40F, which had 364mph at 20,000ft in 1942. Give us a break from the Ki-100 over hyping willya? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Give us a break from the Ki-100 underwhelming willya? It may not be amazing but it's not garbage either. The Type 5 certainly didn't handle like a P-40 and bringing down Superfortresses didn't require remarkable top speed.

Many Japanese pilots said the plane was a delight to fly and, by their account, was one of the better fighters fielded by the IJAAF.

I love the pendulum swing of opinion we see on occasion. If it's not the best than it has to be cr@p.

Zyzbot
11-17-2004, 09:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by F19_Olli72:
Always fun to read these kind of threads prior to a new aircraft beeing released. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Either its "uber" or cr@p. Either way we get another japanese plane for variation, and that imo cant be bad.

Figures and numbers isnt everything, it all comes down to the situation. But personally ive read that the Ki100 pilots considered Hellcats relatively easy kills. And indeed an encounter between Ki100s and Hellcats over Okinawa ended with 14 Hellcats shot down with no losses for the japanese.

Not too shabby for a "'45 plane with '42 performance". <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

No one that I know of has ever found any actual evidence to back this claim of 14 kills. If it really occurred it would easily be found in the USN loss records.

k5054
11-17-2004, 10:47 AM
Told ya it was slow, so slow it's missed the patch....

k5054
11-17-2004, 11:02 AM
Here's an interesting stat. The USAAF lost 25 B-29s where enemy a/c played a part during the whole period of May-August 1945. I don't see how this makes the Ki-100 some kind of B-29 killer, when you consider that all the other IJ fighters had a piece of the fight. They lost 22 B-29s in April, but hardly any 100s were in service then.
This from official USAAF loss figures at www.usaaf.net (http://www.usaaf.net). Actual wartimme numbers may be wrong, of course, but they ought to be in the right ballpark.

Mr_Nakajima
11-17-2004, 11:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by F19_Olli72:
But personally ive read that the Ki100 pilots considered Hellcats relatively easy kills. And indeed an encounter between Ki100s and Hellcats over Okinawa ended with 14 Hellcats shot down with no losses for the japanese.

Not too shabby for a "'45 plane with '42 performance". <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If it had ever happened that would be true enough, and I've seen the same quote several times on these forums already.

But I have never been able to verify that this incident was anything more than Japanese propoganda or over-claiming - certainly I can't find any references which confirm it from the USN side.

F19_Olli72
11-17-2004, 12:04 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Mr_Nakajima:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by F19_Olli72:
But personally ive read that the Ki100 pilots considered Hellcats relatively easy kills. And indeed an encounter between Ki100s and Hellcats over Okinawa ended with 14 Hellcats shot down with no losses for the japanese.

Not too shabby for a "'45 plane with '42 performance". <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

If it had ever happened that would be true enough, and I've seen the same quote several times on these forums already.

But I have never been able to verify that this incident was anything more than Japanese propoganda or over-claiming - certainly I can't find any references which confirm it from the USN side. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Fair enough, i didnt know it. However one that seems confirmed is Major Hinoki Yohei victory over a P-51D flown by Capt. William Benbow. If the Ki-100 was such heap of **** then its not too bad by a onelegged man http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

AlmightyTallest
11-17-2004, 12:36 PM
Geez, take it easy guys, it's not like I'm worried about the Ki-100, I just posted what info I have from a source. I never said it was a bad plane, going by the info, it very maneuverable, has some armor protection as well as other improvements. Nothing bad about that.

My only surprise was how late in the war they came into the action, and also the low number that were actually produced. I'm sure Oleg has good sources and will model it properly, I just thought that if your going to use a 1945 aircraft on the Japanese side, then the U.S. pilots should be allowed to use aircraft the U.S. used in 1945, like the F4U-4.

No gripes, I welcome this addition to PF and will try it out for myself. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Just hoping that Oleg will balance things out for all of us using the best flight models he has to go with.

Personally, I'm waiting for the N1K1J and N1K2J George to fly in. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

A.K.Davis
11-17-2004, 03:06 PM
Francillon's data (which is generally the same data you find in any English source, since they draw from his book) is rather dated, so don't be surprised if Oleg is using other sources to model the Ki-100. Is this good or bad for the Ki-100? We'll see...

AlmightyTallest
11-17-2004, 03:49 PM
I'm with you on that A.K.Davis, Oleg seems to be quite the stickler for accuracy, and if he finds or uses sources that are different but that perhaps are more accurate to the data from Francillon's for example, I'm all for it being implemented to the aircraft.

I'd take accuracy and realism any day for any of the aircraft in Pacific Fighters. I don't think Oleg will let us down on that.

I'll just be patient and fly what's given, still hoping for that flyable N1K1 and K2 George and the F4U-4 of course as well. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Me and my buddies all have our favorites and like to swat each other out of the sky with them all. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

A.K.Davis
11-17-2004, 05:21 PM
BTW, here all the real circumstances regarding the "Ki-100 vs. Hellcat Incident":

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR> On 25 July Maj. Kobayashi disobeyed orders by taking off to intercept marauding Hellcats over Yokaichi airfield, having been instructed to stay on the ground to await incoming bombers. he and his men were by this late stage in the war flying the superlative Kawasaki Ki-100 Goshikisen (Type 5 Fighter), and in the dogfight that took place at hangar-top height, the 244th Sentai pilots reportedly shot down ten of the VF-31 Hellcats that had sortied over Japan from the carrier USS Belleau Wood - the real score was just two for two on both sides. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

source: B-29 Hunters of the JAAF by Henry Sakaida.