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View Full Version : Zero Roll Rate :mh:



Willey
12-10-2006, 09:13 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oacbHQ5cPOE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbGV-oJb-FI

A6M5, dunno which exactly. The last one left http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Just watch and think http://www.ubisoft.de/smileys/3.gif

tigertalon
12-10-2006, 10:57 AM
Ty for sharing! Seen the second one before, but first one is a keeper! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

<span class="ev_code_BLACK"><pre class="ip-ubbcode-code-pre">?In the size of the lie there is always contained a certain factor of credibility,

TC_Stele
12-10-2006, 11:34 AM
I loved that perfect sharp turn in the second video, that was awesome. That Zero is from the Planes of Fame museum in Chino, CA.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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FritzGryphon
12-10-2006, 03:55 PM
Really cool!

Can't help but wish the pilots didn't have to hold back at airshows. They seem limited to rather gentle turns, and prohibited from using high power settings.

Chuck_Older
12-10-2006, 04:06 PM
I'm on dialup...but a word of caution about resored planes being representative of WWII aircraft's performance- even the lastest A6Ms that were restored using original airframes that were re-worked repaired and restored using original blueprints from WWII, using all metric hardware and materials, do not use the correct engine. The sakae and it's japanese cousins are both too rare and too difficult to keep operating. They general replace them with customised P&Ws. It could hamper or even help performance because of weight, front area, customised systems, resized cowlings, etc

DuxCorvan
12-11-2006, 04:42 AM
Agreed, Chuck, but nothing of that seems to have much to do with roll rate, which is mostly influenced by wing design and weight, am I wrong?

BM357_Sniper
12-11-2006, 10:10 AM
Originally posted by DuxCorvan:
Agreed, Chuck, but nothing of that seems to have much to do with roll rate, which is mostly influenced by wing design and weight, am I wrong?

I think what some are forgetting is that the roll rate 'we' are talking about is at and above 250 knots. Especially at 300, controls were basically locked and you wouldn't be rolling to the right. Of course this was most pronounced on the earlier Zeros.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a279/lifeguardhall/bm357_logok.jpg
"It's funny that all these guys with engineering degrees rely so much on their charts and graphs to fly. When they get in the plane, they are lucky to fly straight and level. Get a real pilot in there, one that flies by the seat of their pants and he will make it do things that the 'brains' are still denying."

stansdds
12-12-2006, 04:06 AM
Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
I'm on dialup...but a word of caution about resored planes being representative of WWII aircraft's performance- even the lastest A6Ms that were restored using original airframes that were re-worked repaired and restored using original blueprints from WWII, using all metric hardware and materials, do not use the correct engine. The sakae and it's japanese cousins are both too rare and too difficult to keep operating. They general replace them with customised P&Ws. It could hamper or even help performance because of weight, front area, customised systems, resized cowlings, etc

Let's not forget that restored WW II military aircraft rarely have the armor plating, armored glass, or ammunition installed and most restored fighters lack full machine guns or cannons, they often simply have a tube to simulate the barrels and nothing more. This dramatically affects the weight and therefor the performance of the aircraft.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

When you know as much as I do, you become a danger only to yourself. -Stans, 2006

TC_Stele
12-12-2006, 12:19 PM
Originally posted by Chuck_Older:
I'm on dialup...but a word of caution about resored planes being representative of WWII aircraft's performance- even the lastest A6Ms that were restored using original airframes that were re-worked repaired and restored using original blueprints from WWII, using all metric hardware and materials, do not use the correct engine. The sakae and it's japanese cousins are both too rare and too difficult to keep operating. They general replace them with customised P&Ws. It could hamper or even help performance because of weight, front area, customised systems, resized cowlings, etc

There is only one Japanese airplane left in the world with its original engine, which is in Chino, CA. That one in the video is it!<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

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