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View Full Version : zero fans.... does this work in PF?



fabianfred
11-24-2004, 06:15 PM
"The Japanese introduced a new fighter in 1940 to the fighting in China. Reports as to its specifications were not believed in Washington, preferring to believe it was Chinese incompetence, rather than a superior Japanese fighter that was causing Chinese losses. 78 flew in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The secrets of the Zero were released after the invasion of Attu in June 1942 when a nearly undamaged Zero was found overturned in a bog. The Zero was salvaged and flow for testing of its flight envelop by September 1942. A tip to evading a Zero was immediately broadcast to the fleet units : dive to exceed 200 knots and turn to the right. The heavier US planes could gain speed quickly by diving, at 200 knots the light controls on a Zero became sluggish, and a Zero turned more easily to the left. This escape procedure allowed many US airmen to survive for another day when their experience was able to defeat the Zero."

wondered if it is in the FM in PF?

fabianfred
11-24-2004, 06:15 PM
"The Japanese introduced a new fighter in 1940 to the fighting in China. Reports as to its specifications were not believed in Washington, preferring to believe it was Chinese incompetence, rather than a superior Japanese fighter that was causing Chinese losses. 78 flew in the attack on Pearl Harbor.

The secrets of the Zero were released after the invasion of Attu in June 1942 when a nearly undamaged Zero was found overturned in a bog. The Zero was salvaged and flow for testing of its flight envelop by September 1942. A tip to evading a Zero was immediately broadcast to the fleet units : dive to exceed 200 knots and turn to the right. The heavier US planes could gain speed quickly by diving, at 200 knots the light controls on a Zero became sluggish, and a Zero turned more easily to the left. This escape procedure allowed many US airmen to survive for another day when their experience was able to defeat the Zero."

wondered if it is in the FM in PF?

Mozzie_21
11-24-2004, 06:21 PM
I have always wondered about torque being modeled in flight simulators. Single engined aircraft are much better at turing/rolling one way than the other, but this rarely seems to be modeled.

WTE_Dukayn
11-24-2004, 06:46 PM
dunno about the turning to the right, but yes the Zero's roll rate decreases significantly as it gets faster.

chris455
11-24-2004, 06:50 PM
It does NOT work, at least vs the AI.

Moreover, trying to take advantage of the Zero's lackluster rollrate by scissoring will invariably earn you some badly chewed tailfeathers.

WTE_Dukayn
11-24-2004, 06:59 PM
vs AI isn't a true indication though, they cheat http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Stiglr
11-24-2004, 07:06 PM
I know this tactic works in Target:Rabaul (http://www.targetware.net)... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gifalthough most of the Yankees roll and dive to the left, since they're naturally right handed. Either way, it works at speed, when the roll rate and control get stiff.

It can buy you precious seconds in almost any Allied bird. If you have buddies nearby, all it takes is half a second for them to clear you if they get into position...

LEXX_Luthor
11-24-2004, 07:27 PM
Target Rabaul has no AI. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

heywooood
11-24-2004, 10:09 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Stiglr
11-24-2004, 11:05 PM
Yeah, and therefore, we don't have that to b*tch about.

If somebody does some'n stupid, it's a guy on a computer screwing up.

No, wait, there are robo gunners. But by and large, they're pretty well done.

Saburo_0
11-25-2004, 12:24 AM
At 200 knots the Zero's handling is degraded, but still not really bad. Plus once you start turning in a US plane you're going to lose some speed which is bad. So I'd go faster than than 200 knts if I were trying to get away from a Zero.
Seems like I read somwhere that P-38 pilots always tried to keep atleast 275 mph indicated when in combat. (?)

actionhank1786
11-25-2004, 12:31 AM
Works for me in the Jug http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
If i find one on my tail, i go full throttle and down hard...like a ******...
Whoops?

Fliger747
11-25-2004, 03:15 PM
Under the 'no free lunch rule' , lightly wing loded planes turn better, but loose more energy doing so. The question then becomes whether or not the power loading of the plane is such that one can accelerate again with enough rapidity to compensate. Most dogfights keep proceeding earthward because of the 'power' problem.

The F-16 broke new ground here with the ability to both manuver hard and compensate quickly.

The historical accuracy of this 'feature' is and has been questioned.

Mjollnir111675
11-25-2004, 03:23 PM
"although most of the Yankees roll and dive to the left, since they're naturally right handed."


What tha hades does being right er left handed have ta do with which way a pilot breaks?? It has to do with them being taught which way the prop and torque turns the plane o'er in a certain direction.Nothing more!! Left or right handed? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif I've heard darned near everything now!!!

Mjollnir111675
11-25-2004, 03:25 PM
Darn it all!! Whats next army soldiers are discouraged from using the M-16 if they are left handed cuz the ejectin' brass may hit em in tha face??? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Stiglr
11-25-2004, 04:14 PM
It's reflex, Mjolnir.

When suddenly faced with a need to break turn, most pilots, being right handed, will throw their stick left and pull.

WTE_Dukayn
11-25-2004, 04:26 PM
I must be strange, I'm right-handed and I prefer turning to the right, at least in a climb. Left in a dive.

Mjollnir111675
11-25-2004, 04:42 PM
"Proper instruction and discipline can lead to a second instinct that is sharper than any nature given/born instinct!!!" Petty Occifer Blah blah blah
R.T.C. Great Lakes Class o' '93!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Raptor_20thFG
11-26-2004, 03:47 AM
I hate to tell you wonderfull pilots but hes right Right handed pilots do have a tendency to break left in an emergency

k5054
11-26-2004, 04:28 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Under the 'no free lunch rule' , lightly wing loded planes turn better, but loose more energy doing so. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Fliger, I know you know better than this. Lightly loaded means less Cl for any given g, and therefore less induced drag and less energy loss, all else being equal. Of course at any given speed the lighter a/c has less energy to lose, and a lightly loaded a/c with the same power will get the energy back quicker. Where the no free lunch comes in is at high IAS and low/moderate g, where the profile drag is the dominant factor and all that wing area costs speed.

For everybody's info, at high speeds aileron torque outnumbers engine torque by in the order of 10-1, so the difference rolling one way rather than another is 11 to 9, not much. Low speeds mean it makes a lot more difference, the aileron torque relates to speed squared, engine torque does not vary with airspeed.

Sqn81-Blacksky
11-26-2004, 04:34 AM
The tendency to turn left has nothing to do with training but with muscles..when turning left as a right-hander you flex your arm towards the thorax using mostly the big breast muscle (m.pect. major) to move your arm away you use much smaller muscles so having less power. Plus the way the shoulder can rotate inwards is bigger then outwards so the "natural" movement is towards the thorax.