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XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 04:38 PM
From Bud Anderson interview -

QUOTE -

In the fall of 1944, the 357th combat-tested the new G-suits that had been developed for pilots, as Bud Anderson recounts. "The Mustangs could take very hard turns. Long before the wings flew off, the pilots would lose consciousness. Five G's and you might "gray out" but be able to function.

Six G's or so and you would black out completely. The form-fitting suits inflated as the airplane pulled G's, hugging you, and preventing the blood from leaving your head all at once. There were two experimental suits. One was water-filled, and turned out to be too cold at six miles up, even when filled with warm water on the ground. The other ones, air suits, drew air from the pressure side of the engine's vacuum pump. These suits wrapped around your abdomen, thighs, and calves, and inflated automatically. These worked much better."

"With the G-suits, we could fly a little harder, turn a little tighter. We could pull maybe one extra G now, which gave us an edge. There was no resistance to wearing them as we understood that wearing them was the same as making the airplane better."

- UNQUOTE


Interesting question - What was the influence of US G-Suits on fighter versus fighter combat? At first glance, high speed turns and dive recoveries would have benefited.



Blutarski

XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 04:38 PM
From Bud Anderson interview -

QUOTE -

In the fall of 1944, the 357th combat-tested the new G-suits that had been developed for pilots, as Bud Anderson recounts. "The Mustangs could take very hard turns. Long before the wings flew off, the pilots would lose consciousness. Five G's and you might "gray out" but be able to function.

Six G's or so and you would black out completely. The form-fitting suits inflated as the airplane pulled G's, hugging you, and preventing the blood from leaving your head all at once. There were two experimental suits. One was water-filled, and turned out to be too cold at six miles up, even when filled with warm water on the ground. The other ones, air suits, drew air from the pressure side of the engine's vacuum pump. These suits wrapped around your abdomen, thighs, and calves, and inflated automatically. These worked much better."

"With the G-suits, we could fly a little harder, turn a little tighter. We could pull maybe one extra G now, which gave us an edge. There was no resistance to wearing them as we understood that wearing them was the same as making the airplane better."

- UNQUOTE


Interesting question - What was the influence of US G-Suits on fighter versus fighter combat? At first glance, high speed turns and dive recoveries would have benefited.



Blutarski

XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 04:53 PM
I didn't realize G-suits were used in or invented during WWII. I thought that was an invention that came along after the first jet powered planes took to the skies in the Korean war. Good info. Thanks! S!

XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 05:03 PM
Striker-PBNA wrote:
- I didn't realize G-suits were used in or invented
- during WWII. I thought that was an invention that
- came along after the first jet powered planes took
- to the skies in the Korean war. Good info. Thanks!
- S!
-
-

The Germans had a reflector gunsight in WW1 that was mounted on an Albatross D.III. They also had a motor driven rotary machinegun.

Considering the P-51 was "notorious" for having a weak airframe, I don't think the g-suits would help to much./i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif


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XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 05:05 PM
I dont know about the water filled one but the vacumn sealed abedomin and thigh gsuit was suppose to let a pilot hold an extra G without blackinging out in wwii but like anything the results variered from pilot to pilot.

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XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 06:19 PM
MiloMorai wrote:
-
- Considering the P-51 was "notorious" for having a
- weak airframe, I don't think the g-suits would help
- to much./i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif
-

Define "weak". By US standards it was a weak airframe, but by British standards, it was a strong airframe. By Japanese standards, it was practically a flying tank.

Harry Voyager

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XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 06:46 PM
Harry, see the /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif at the end./i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif Check your PMs.



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"Only a dead 'chamber pot' is a good 'chamber pot'!"

XyZspineZyX
10-30-2003, 07:00 PM
Yeah a measely 8Gs at 8000 lbs. What a POS.