PDA

View Full Version : What year did the spitfire MKVBl cliped wing fly?



JugHead-usmc
09-26-2005, 05:53 PM
What year did it see action 41 or later.

thanks guys just wanna know.

JugHead-usmc
09-26-2005, 05:53 PM
What year did it see action 41 or later.

thanks guys just wanna know.

Low_Flyer_MkII
09-26-2005, 06:04 PM
Off the top of my head -
Tested towards the end of 1942, in action early 1943. Will confirm later when I've consulted my books.

vocatx
09-26-2005, 06:37 PM
According to my references, the Mk. VB went into service in the spring or summer of 1941.

Low_Flyer_MkII
09-26-2005, 06:41 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by vocatx:
According to my references, the Mk. VB went into service in the spring or summer of 1941. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Indeed it did, but I thought we were dealing with the clipped wing Vb variant here.

JugHead-usmc
09-26-2005, 06:56 PM
Yes we are dealing with the clipped wing varant.

ImpStarDuece
09-26-2005, 08:07 PM
I dont think it was until 1942, possibly quite late 1942.

Certainly there was no need to clip the wings of Mk Vs until they recieved the 45M, 50M or 55M, the low altitude versions of the Merlin.

The earliest reference I can find is for March 1943 with No 92 squadron in the Med, but i am sure that they were around before that. Most of the pictures of Spitfire Vs post July 1943 are of clipped variants.

Low_Flyer_MkII
09-27-2005, 11:07 AM
Sorry for delay - according to 'The Spitfire Story' - Alfred Price, VbLF(clipped wing) was tested late '42.
The only reference I can for active service is with a South African Squadron in 1943, and a photo in Janes Fighting Aircraft of WWII of one in U.S. 8th Air Force colours. Will post more if I dig any more up.

Hope it helps.

luftluuver
09-27-2005, 06:31 PM
Spitfire: The History

Mod 788 &gt; introduced clipped wings (all marks) 17.11.43

While looking this up came across Mod 787 &gt; 'delete painting fuelage interiors (all Marks)' 13.9.43

I think 43 is a typo as Mods after are dated 42.

vocatx
09-27-2005, 06:40 PM
My mistake, Low Flyer. You are correct. According to Jane's All the World's Airoplanes, 1946, "In 1943 the Mk. V was fitted with clipped wings and the Merlin 45M, 50M, or 55M for service as a low altitude figher..."

Friendly_flyer
09-28-2005, 03:00 AM
The 331 and 332 (Norwegian) Squadrons flying fron North Weald had a few clipped ones for "rhubarb" missions. They did not like them much, and according to the book "Tally hoo!" (written by one of the pilots), the pilots called them "the clipped, cropped, crapped Spitfires".

luftluuver
09-28-2005, 05:36 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Friendly_flyer:
The 331 and 332 (Norwegian) Squadrons flying fron North Weald had a few clipped ones for "rhubarb" missions. They did not like them much, and according to the book "Tally hoo!" (written by one of the pilots), the pilots called them "the clipped, cropped, crapped Spitfires". </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Do you know why they were called 'clipped, cropped, crapped'?

Badsight.
09-28-2005, 05:38 AM
was the Prop really shorter or was it meaning something else ?

stathem
09-28-2005, 06:21 AM
Badsight,

No, supercharger (impeller) was 'cropped'

btw, it's clapped, not crapped. They may well have been **** but it refers to 'clapped out' airframes.

Friendly_flyer
09-28-2005, 06:35 AM
Stahem is right about the supercharger.

It was called c. c. "crapped", not "clapped". The "crapped" part was a refference to the pilots opinion of it.

stathem
09-28-2005, 06:53 AM
Ah, ok, I'll check when I get home, my source was from Clostermann who also flew it. It's entirely possible different groups of pilots had different expressions.

Dunno if clapped out is an expression that's used much in other parts of the world, but it's in common usage in mine. Especially when people see the cars that I drive. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

ImpStarDuece
09-28-2005, 07:04 AM
It was clipped, cropped and clapped.

As in;

Clipped wings

Cropped superchargers, and

Clapped out older airframes.

To be fair, the clipped wing versions of the Mk V were very useful low level fighterbombers. They could get to 8,000 feet in 1 minute 45 seconds after take off and did between 350-360 mph at around 6000 feet. They extended the front line service of the Mk V by about 12 months, providing close escort for medium bomber raids, low level airsuperiority (with Mk IXs or Mk XIVs covering) and worked as fighter bombers, foward air controllers and other less glamourous jobs.

It was reckoned that the modified Mk Vs were a match for a 109G or a 190A below 10,000 feet.

SlickStick
09-28-2005, 09:49 AM
Mmmm just the sight of a tough-looking, yet still graceful, clipped-wing Spitfire gets me excited. Increased low altitude performance, better roll, menacing appearance, what's not to love about a CW Spitfire?!? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

http://www.leica-gallery.net/photo-lib/image/large/spit-31774.jpg

Friendly_flyer
09-28-2005, 10:08 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by stathem:
Ah, ok, I'll check when I get home, my source was from Clostermann who also flew it. It's entirely possible different groups of pilots had different expressions. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Uuups, my fault. I'm sorry, called in Norwegian and English doesn't mean exactly the same ting. The "crapped" part was a very local variant of the name. "Clapped" (not being an entirely honourable term either) was "official" (or rather, what most pilots seem to have called it).

stathem
09-28-2005, 10:29 AM
Hehe, no need to apologise, I thought it'd be the case that we were both right, just language difference.