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View Full Version : Did any of ww2 a/c use gatling guns?



XyZspineZyX
10-27-2003, 10:53 PM
any at all? They seem to be so unpopular back then, but are used now on most of fighter planes/helicopters, I wonder why?


Message Edited on 10/27/0310:22PM by yay1

XyZspineZyX
10-27-2003, 10:53 PM
any at all? They seem to be so unpopular back then, but are used now on most of fighter planes/helicopters, I wonder why?


Message Edited on 10/27/0310:22PM by yay1

XyZspineZyX
10-27-2003, 10:59 PM
well, gatlings weren't used during ww2 but, the C-47 carried miniguns in Vietnam. Here these aircraft were known as puff the magic dragon and Spooky.

here's a fire for effect

http://www.1stcavmedic.com/pictures/ac47-firepower-night-view.jpg


daylight

http://www.1stcavmedic.com/pictures/ac-47-parked.jpg


action

http://www.1stcavmedic.com/pictures/ac-47-spookgn1.jpg


I'm a crappy pilot, but one hell of a shot.

XyZspineZyX
10-27-2003, 11:02 PM
Gatling guns in modern aircraft use eclectic motors to turn the barrels and some even rotate chambers (Vulcan cannon). the equipment would have been too heavy in fighters and the ROF in those days was comparable to regular MG

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XyZspineZyX
10-27-2003, 11:04 PM
also due to the speed of todays dogfight, you want to be able to put a lot of fire on the target. the gatling based M61 is one of the many guns that gives you that opportunity.

I'm a crappy pilot, but one hell of a shot.

XyZspineZyX
10-27-2003, 11:19 PM
Sharpe26 wrote:
- also due to the speed of todays dogfight, you want
- to be able to put a lot of fire on the target. the
- gatling based M61 is one of the many guns that gives
- you that opportunity.
-
- I'm a crappy pilot, but one hell of a shot.

Interesting point regarding speed of modern air combat and rotary multi-barreled cannons. Such weapons actually put the attacker at a disadvantage in some situations.

The M61 has a 0.4 second delay between activation (pilot presses trigger) and the first round being fired. This compares to a 0.05 second delay on most revolver type single barrel cannon.

Hence, in a 1 second firing opportunity (as may occur in a dogfight) the M61 fires the same number, or even fewer rounds than single barreled cannons do. This is one of the areas the M61A2 aims to improve performance (along with weight reduction, high weight being the other drawback with multibarrel systems).

"As weaponry, both were good, but in far different ways from each other. In a nutshell, I describe it this way: if the FW 190 was a sabre, the 109 was a florett, or foil, like that used in the precision art of fencing." - Gunther Rall

XyZspineZyX
10-27-2003, 11:57 PM
True that the M61 has that problem but newer gatling guns, such as the ones used on the Eurofighter have a much faster response time (infact its "advertised" as having such) and thus being able to hit a target or land more bullets on a target that the M61 can't.

Its odd, the M61 still must be a decent enough weapon since it's going into even the F/A-22 and probably into the JSF.

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XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 12:04 AM
i think weight might have been a big factor as to why there where none used. most likely it was a technogoly issue. not built yet.

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 12:25 AM
I thought the Eurofighter had a revolver cannon...

http://www.eurofighter.starstreak.net/Eurofighter/weapons.html

But yeah, the M61 (in it's A2 incarnation) is still a good aircraft gun.... I wonder if the US will stick with multibarrel types for it's fighters or switch to singles in the future.

That is of course if they don't go for DEW's first /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

"As weaponry, both were good, but in far different ways from each other. In a nutshell, I describe it this way: if the FW 190 was a sabre, the 109 was a florett, or foil, like that used in the precision art of fencing." - Gunther Rall

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 01:28 AM
ww2 ? no ..but the germans had this just about ready to field.the MG 213C was designed in 1944, and it was a revolver gun with a five-chamber cylinder. By dividing the loading of a cartridge in three steps, a high rate of fire could be achieved while keeping the forces within the gun limited. There were 20mm and 30mm versions. The MG 213C made linear action guns obsolete for fighters, and was copied widely.

Revolver Guns
Name Ammunition Rate of Fire Muzzle elocityWeightQfactor
MG 213C/20 20 x 135 ( 112 g) 1400 rpm 1050 m/s 75 kg 19200
MG 213C/30 30 x 85B ( 330 g) 1200 rpm 530 m/s 75 kg 12400


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XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 02:01 AM
The Gatling gun, as a concept, was largely forgotten by all armourers for the first half of the 20th Century. The original gatling gun was rendered obselete by Maxim action guns which were lighter, cheaper and not limited by the arm strength of the firer.

It was revived as a concept in the 50's by the US who's main design thrust was obtaining the maximum possible firing rate with acceptable reliability.

So it really wasn't considered at all for WWII era planes. And even if it did it would have only been useful for "clean-nosed" designs such as the P38 and most twin+ engine planes. Single engine planes couldn't carry them in the nose due to synchronisation issues and the increased weight and diameter would've been tough on wing or pod mounts.

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XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 02:36 AM
In 1918, H. Lubbe who directed Fokker Waffenfabric (later of Arado) had designed a 12 barrel motor driven a/c machine gun. One can see a photo on pg 14 of "Arado: History of an A/C Company".

The Germans also had a reflector gunsight in WW1.



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