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View Full Version : WW2 Corsair Restored by Chance-Vought Retirees! Cool!



Blutarski2004
01-24-2009, 10:39 AM
Great story. Aircraft restored in markings of Pacific Marine ace Bob Hanson.

Go here for details -

http://www.star-telegram.com/251/story/1162270.html

Blutarski2004
01-24-2009, 10:39 AM
Great story. Aircraft restored in markings of Pacific Marine ace Bob Hanson.

Go here for details -

http://www.star-telegram.com/251/story/1162270.html

WhiteKnight77
01-24-2009, 11:07 AM
The only problem is that the red bar/stripe wasn't added to the roundel until 1947. Otherwise, great to hear that another Corsair was rebuilt, even if unflyable.

horseback
01-24-2009, 04:43 PM
For pete's sake, it's a newspaper article. What makes you think that they'd get the facts straight,or care if they did as long as they printed a 'good story'?

Besides, most people, even the ones who worked on the planes or flew them, never concerned themselves with minutia the way historians and hobbyists like us do.

It is a Dash 4 Corsair, which is mainly associated with Korea, and the markings, except for putting Hanson's name and 'kills' on it, look to be from that era. Bob Hanson died in combat flying a Dash 1, so we should probably think of it as a tribute, not a replica of his plane.

cheers

horseback

WhiteKnight77
01-24-2009, 06:26 PM
It is not the newspaper article that I was pointing out to be wrong. The painter of said plane should have known better. They chose a specific person to honor with said paintjob of a particlar era, not the paper.

horseback
01-24-2009, 10:43 PM
From the article:<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The museum-bound aircraft features Navy markings on one side of the fuselage and Marine markings on the other. The names of a famed Corsair pilot of each service, and Japanese flags for each of the enemy airplanes they shot down, are painted alongside the cockpit.

The honored Marine, 2nd Lt. Robert M. Hanson, shot down 25 Japanese planes before he was shot down and killed by enemy ground fire on what was scheduled to be his final combat mission. Hanson was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

Atkins said the rebuilt Corsairís final destination has yet to be determined. "The Frontiers of Flight [museum in Dallas] would love to have it. It will stay in the Dallas-Fort Worth area; that has been decided." </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

As I said; a tribute display, not a replica of Hanson's plane.

cheers

horseback

woofiedog
01-25-2009, 12:00 AM
Have to say they did One Hec of a job rebuilding that Corsair.

A little info of Marine Lt. Robert Murray Hanson last mission.

On February 3, 1944, one day before his 24th birthday, Hanson participated in a fighter sweep. On the return flight, he left his flight path to strafe a lighthouse on Cape St. George, New Ireland, that had proved troublesome as a enemy flak tower and observation post. His friends watched from above as Hanson's big blue-gray Corsair ran at the tower, its six machine guns peppering the structure. Suddenly, they were horrified to see Hanson's aircraft shudder as its wing disintegrated from flak hits. The young ace tried to ditch, but his aircraft hit the surface, cartwheeled and crashed, leaving only scattered debris.

Hanson was the third and last Marine Corsair pilot to receive the Medal of Honor and the youngest.