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View Full Version : Eric Brown's Ta 152H test report, is it avaliable on the web?



XyZspineZyX
09-03-2003, 06:31 PM
Strangely enough there were no serious comparison flights with the Ta 152 against other fighters. Although there were several captured ones. Eric Brown flew one Ta 152H and did a brief evaluation. What was his comments? Where can I find hem? Any tips?

Thanks/Robban

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'When it comes to aircombat, I'd rather be lucky than good any day!'

Message Edited on 09/03/0305:42PM by robban75

XyZspineZyX
09-03-2003, 06:31 PM
Strangely enough there were no serious comparison flights with the Ta 152 against other fighters. Although there were several captured ones. Eric Brown flew one Ta 152H and did a brief evaluation. What was his comments? Where can I find hem? Any tips?

Thanks/Robban

http://members.chello.se/unni/GK-2.JPG


'When it comes to aircombat, I'd rather be lucky than good any day!'

Message Edited on 09/03/0305:42PM by robban75

XyZspineZyX
09-03-2003, 06:41 PM
They didn't have anything else than the normal fuel so no special boosts. He didn't like it too much as felt 190 A-x was better.


-jippo

XyZspineZyX
09-03-2003, 06:49 PM
Try CHDT`s pbase website, IIRC he has it uploaded there.

Don`t ask where it is, I dunno. Though, if you have webspace somewhere, I can upload it for you - you do not want to ask it in email from me around now... /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

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'Only a dead Indianer is a good Indianer!'

Vezérünk a Bátorság, K*sérµnk a Szerencse!
(Courage leads, Luck escorts us! - Historical motto of the 101st Puma Fighter Regiment)

Flight tests and other aviation performance data: http://www.pbase.com/isegrim

XyZspineZyX
09-03-2003, 08:25 PM
Wings Of The Luftwaffe

Airlife Publishing Ltd 2001

ISBN 1 85310 413 2


As I'm in such a good mood, thanks to SECUDUS I'll type up the passage on the Ta 152 and post it STRICTLY as a one-off in the interests of research and publicity for the book /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Bear with me - I'm not a speed typist and have a couple of commitments tonight.

Wish I had a bleedin' scanner.....

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XyZspineZyX
09-03-2003, 10:06 PM
Here you go - apologies for any typo's


"Flying the Ta 152

Having flown the BMW 801-powered Fw 190 on a many occaissions and in several versions, I was understandably delighted when an opportunity arose to get my hands on what was, from the production standpoint at least, the ultimate development of Kurt Tank's superb basic design, the high-flying Ta 152H-1. I recall that the sole example of this intriguing and allegedly potent fighter to be taken to the UK had been, for reasons unknown to me, dismantled in Germany and flown to the Royal Aircraft Establishment at Farnborough in the capacious hold of an Arado Ar 232B transport, wheras run-of-the-mill captured aircraft were almost invariably flown in. Oddly enough, this cotton-wool treatment of Tank's fighter continued, and I cannot recall that, after re-assembly, it was put through any specific flight testing other than that I was instructed to perform while flying it from Farnborough to Brize Norton for storage during the summer of 1945.

The original radial-engined Fw 190 had been, in my view, an aerodynamic beauty oozing lethality, but it struck me on first seeing the Ta 152H-1 standing outside Farnborough's famoua 'A' shed in the company of the latest Allied fighters - the Tempest V, the Mustang III, the Spitfire 21 and the Martin-Baker M.B.5 - that Tank's design had lost much of its aesthetic appeal over the intervening years, with its overly prominent proboscis and wings that seemed to stretch into infinity. If now less curvacious, it still exuded efficiency, however, and I had little doubt that it was capable of doing all that the Germans claimed for it.

High performance at all altitudes was ensured by its 18.71 Imp gal (85 l) of nitrous oxide (GM 1) and 15.4 Imp gal (70 l) of methanol- water (MW 50), which injected into the Jumo 213E engine according to the altitude at which the fighter was flying, boosted output mightily. Perhaps this was the clue as to why the Ta 152H-1 was never really put through its paces in the UK - we had no GM 1 or MW 50 at Farnborough! Nevertheless, lack of nitrous oxide and methanol-water notwithstanding, my adrenalin began to flow that summer morning as I eased myself into the cockpit of Ta 152H-1 Werk-Nr 150168 and peered along that immense nose which stretched out so far ahead of the windscreen - the only aircraft I was ever to fly offering a comparable stretch of nose was the Blackburn Firebrand. The German fighter was, of course, equipped with a oressured cabin and since I had done quite a bit of flying in the pressurised Spitfire XIX on clean air and turbulence investigation, the opportunity given by the flight to Brize Norton to make a comparison between the German and British fighters was irresistable.

The take-off of the Ta 152H-1 was shorter than that of the Spitfire XIX and the climb was steeper albeit somewhat slower than that of the British fighter, but once the 30,000 ft (9 145 m) mark had slipped oast the altimeter, the Tank fighter gave me the impression of holding its rate of climb better than its British counterpart. In so far as manouvrabbility was concerned, the story was very much the same; the Spitfire was certainly the better of the two below 30,000 ft (9 145 m), there being little to choose between British and German fighters between that altitude and 35,000 ft (10 760m), but above the latter altitude the Ta 152H-1 enjoyed a decided edge. I gave the German fighter its head on the way to Brize Norton and did a full throttle run at 35,000 ft (10 670 m), which, by my rough reckoning, worked out at around 425 mph (684 km/h), or about 35 mph (56 km/h) less than the SpitfireXIX was capable of, but, of course, the availability of GM 1 boost would have more than redressed the balance and the Ta 152H-1 was certainly the superior aeroplane on the score of range. In essence, however, these two potential opponents were remarkably close from many aspects, illustrating how closely parallel Britain and Germany were running in piston-engined fighter technology.

On the descent from altitude to Brize Norton, I had time to make quick checks on the stability and control of the German fighter. I found a noticeable reduction in roll rate and an increase in the stick force per g by comparison with its BMW 801-powered predecessors, some of the more attractive qualities of the original fighter having been sacrificed in order to acheive the best possible performance at extreme altitudes. I therefore expectede the stability to be improved over that of the Fw 190, as indeed it was, but it was not so good that a protracted flight at 45,000 ft (13 715 m) would not have been a fatiguing experience, a fact evidently recognised by the provision of an autopilot.

The landing at Brize Norton from an aproach at 118 mph (190 km/h) was staightforward enough although I took the precaution of landing off a curved final to see round that fantastic nose. With its wide-track undercarriage, the aircraft felt very stable on the landing run, a characteristic for which I was to be thankful some weeks later, after the powers-that-be had decided that our Ta 152H-1 should take its place in the static park of the Exhibition of German Aircraft and Equipment that was being organised at Farnborough.

On 22 October 1945, I returned to Brize Norton to bring the Ta 152H-1 back to Farnborough for the exhibition, the fighter having been in storage since I had delivered it there on 18 August. Needless to say, I gave the aircraft a pretty thorough pre-flight check and engine run-up before taking-off for Farnborough. In the event, the flight was uneventful, but once I touched down on Farnborough's main runway and began to apply the foot brakes I immediately realised that these were very weak indeed. In fact, they faded away rapidly to zero effectiveness. A slight swing started to develop and I let this go enough to steer me on to the grass in order to slow the aircraft. I then applied full opposite rudder to prevent a ground loop developing. After a few adrenalin-pumping seconds, the Ta 152H-1 slowed gently to a standstill. I doubt that this hydraulic fault was ever rectified as I cannot recollect the fighter ever flying again.

In my view, the Ta 152H-1 was every bit as good as any of its Allied piston-engined counterparts and, from some aspects, better than most. It was unfortunate for the Jagdflieger but undoubtedly fortunate for the Allies that it arrived on the scene too late to play any serious role in the air war."





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Message Edited on 09/03/0310:17PM by Low_Flyer

XyZspineZyX
09-04-2003, 06:06 AM
Excellent Low_Flyer! Thank you VERY much! Very interesting read!/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Thanks again!!

//Robban

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'When it comes to aircombat, I'd rather be lucky than good any day!'

XyZspineZyX
09-04-2003, 06:54 PM
You're welcome - I just happened to have the book in front of me when I read your original post - and as I mentioned, was in a very good mood. Glad to be of help /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

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