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Jatro13th
05-03-2006, 01:03 PM
Hi all!

I just remembered something that I asked when I first joined the forum but never really got an answer.

I once asked if there is any chance that a G-meter will ever be incorprated in the sim since there is no 'seat off the pants' sensation. Im asking this because I find it quite important to see when I have really unloaded my wings with 0 Gs, or when I am about to black out...

What do you think? Would it be too difficult to implement? Would it be worth the try? Do you find a G-meter useful?

Cheers!

Bremspropeller
05-03-2006, 01:07 PM
Granted pilot fatigue is modelled - YES ! (Even if it's just another speedbar-value).

p-11.cAce
05-03-2006, 01:08 PM
I'm not aware of any wwII a/c being equipped with a g-meter so why put it in game? Anyway its not like a red-out or black-out happen instantly...when you start to fade just lessen the stick pull or push http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Bremspropeller
05-03-2006, 01:11 PM
Check ot the P-47 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif

Jatro13th
05-03-2006, 01:27 PM
Wow, th P47 has a Gmeter? Never noticed that! I'll go straight away to see it!


As I said, there is no seat off the pants sensation, so even if these a/c didn't have a Gmeter, the pilot could feel it, so I guess, adding a Gmeter at the speed bar thingy wouldn't be considered 'cheating'...

Yeah, maybe the black&red out is not much of an issue, but the better acceleration during an unloaded dive, would give me better acceleration... so it's quite important I guess...

Thanks for replying guys!

Viper2005_
05-03-2006, 02:00 PM
Red lines and g limits only apply if there is a serious chance of the aeroplane being flown again.

In a fight just forget about them and keep your eyes on the bandit(s) instead.

Lose sight, lose the fight.

I agree that 0 g unloads are useful. However, if you get to almost 0 you get almost all of the benefit. Often if you're unloading you'll want to be looking over your shoulder or in your mirror rather at your panel to correct that 0.2 g error...

It's far more useful to learn what a given g load looks like in terms of pitch rate.

If you feel that way inclined it's possible to calculate what kind of pitch rate to expect at a given g/TAS combination. You could then gain experience in wonderwoman view.

However, at a very simple level, if you're trimmed for level flight, you're pulling 1 g. Roll inverted and your g meter would still read 1 g. Therefore half of that pitch rate will give you 0 g.

hamselv2
05-03-2006, 02:32 PM
The game already has a G load gauge if you enable and use DeviceLink.
Can be readout with UDPGraph or similar applications.

Jatro13th
05-03-2006, 05:30 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

TX-EcoDragon
05-03-2006, 09:47 PM
Originally posted by Viper2005_:
. . . However, at a very simple level, if you're trimmed for level flight, you're pulling 1 g. Roll inverted and your g meter would still read 1 g. Therefore half of that pitch rate will give you 0 g.

Something that you can do to find neutral trim is to stabilize in cruise and trim for hands off, then roll inverted and note the number of trim clicks to trim for hands off inverted flight, then split the difference between the upright and inverted trim positions and use that as your trim setting. . .letting go of the stick should then give you something near a 0G condition which you can then use to learn what that pitch rate looks like (for that speed anyway). I use a similar method when flying aerobatics, this does of course cause higher stick forces, but vertical lines, and lines with rolls are easier to draw while maintaining linearity while rolling, and the change in stick forces during rapidly changing speeds is reduced too so the pilot workload is a little less. . even though the physical workout might be a bit more.

WWMaxGunz
05-04-2006, 12:48 AM
Eco, is that trim independant of speed? Like, if speed changes is the zero G trim still good?

WWMaxGunz
05-04-2006, 12:59 AM
Originally posted by p-11.cAce:
I'm not aware of any wwII a/c being equipped with a g-meter so why put it in game?

Every plane with a conscious pilot has an uncalibrated G-meter in the driver seat.

You ever jump up and down? Or just down? Or ride a fast elevator a bunch of floors?

With practice you might even have a good idea of how many G's but near zero G is hard
to mistake as you will feel that you are falling!

TX-EcoDragon
05-04-2006, 02:27 AM
Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:
Eco, is that trim independant of speed? Like, if speed changes is the zero G trim still good?

It's pretty close, but I wouldn't be surprised if it deviated a bit over large speed changes due to asymmetry of the lifting surfaces, thrustline of the powerplant, and CG of the aircraft etc.

In the aircraft that I have done this in, it€s pretty much right on through the full speed range of the aircraft. Coming to a stop going up into a tailslide or hammerhead, for example, if I€ve set the aircraft for neutral trim, I can let go of the stick and not notice any pitch deviation, after the slide/pivot when I€m on the downline I can do the same thing as speeds approach Vne. In an aircraft that has a larger speed envelope, and one that is a little less symmetrical I would expect the difference might increase a bit.