PDA

View Full Version : Patrol Diary of Herbert Altmeier, Chief Gunner (long)



paulhager
10-09-2005, 08:59 PM
1 Dec 1943, St. Nazaire
My transfer from naval defense battery duty, port of St. Nazaire, to submarines had been accepted. Today reported for duty aboard U-340. I got first look at the boat: a new Type VII, equipped with 3 quad 20 mm FLAK mounts. I thought it auspicious that this would be the first patrol for both me and the boat. Captain von Stunde and most of crew were from another boat that had been heavily damaged in an air attack just 100 km from base. Bad luck to be attacked so close to home €" good luck they survived.

3 Dec 1943
I was put in charge of the FLAK detachment. Commenced gunnery drills. I€ve the best eyes in the group €" not too surprising since I was told by the doctors at my physical that my vision was in the top 99%. I always have the best eyes.

6 Dec 1943
Not surprisingly, I have been given a second duty: standing watch. I was called to the Captain€s office. When I entered he had a folder €" presumably containing my files €" open on his desk, which he was reading intently. €œReporting as ordered, Captain.€ He didn€t look up to return my salute €" he just said, €œBe seated.€ Not one to put a man at ease, the Captain continued to look at my files, saying nothing. Finally, he took a sheet out of the folder, got up, and walked to the other side of the room. He held the sheet out to his side and said, €œRead the tenth line from the top.€ I complied. €œGood,€ he said, €œyou€ll stand watch. Dismissed.€ Taciturn fellow, the Old Man.

10 Dec 1943
Drilled the FLAK crew all day. This included drill with the tachystoscope. Großman had the best score, as usual. For a joke, I had inserted a photo I took of Yvette, the prettiest girl at the €œSeaman€s Tavern€. Großman was calling out the silhouettes as fast as they appeared: €œPBY€, €œSunderland€, €œBf-109.€ When her image flashed on the screen, Großman didn€t miss a beat €" he said, €œAngel thighs,€ her nickname. Laughs all around.

11 Dec 1943
We stripped and cleaned all the guns. Not really needed €" mostly it was an antidote for the boredom.

13 Dec 1943
More recognition exercises with the tachystoscope €" this time it was ship silhouettes and I and the rest of the watch crew were drilling. Naturally, I came out on top.

15 Dec 1943
Torpedo training today. I€m not a torpedo-man but the Old Man seems to think that the more training a crewman receives, the better. The boat will be carrying T3 electrics, FaTs €" a €œladder search€ torpedo €" and a new type of torpedo called the T5 €œWren€. This torpedo will detect the sounds of enemy ships and head for them. Once the T5 is fired, it will seek out the loudest sound €" this could be our own boat €" so it€s important to remain €œall quiet€ when the T5 is running.

22 Dec 1943
0400 €" got up to prepare for assembly and inspection. Boat is departing today. XO spoke briefly then dismissed the crew for breakfast. Crew on boat 0530. Cast off moorings and eased out of our slip at 0642.

Day was cold and clear. Old Man stayed on the surface and sent the FLAK detachment topside.
http://tinypic.com/egtnnt.jpg

23 Dec 1943
Weather remained good. Old Man conducted diving drills but, for the most part, we stayed on the surface. I think the Old Man is saying he€s not intimidated by enemy aircraft. I stood second watch.

24 Dec 1943
ALARM! I was awakened by the sounds of a crash dive. It was sometime around 0200. The radar detector had picked up emissions and the XO dived the boat. In short order we found out that a destroyer was approaching. I reported to the torpedo room but I wasn€t needed. I returned to crew quarters. All quiet was ordered. After some minutes the boat began to rise to what I assumed must be periscope depth. The Old Man was now at the con and preparing to engage the destroyer. More minutes elapsed. It was agonizing. Being off duty, there was nothing to do and I had only the vaguest idea what was transpiring. I thought I heard a gurgling sound. Straßer whispered it was the stern tube being flooded. That meant the Old Man was going to use one of the Wrens against the destroyer. More minutes ticked by. Then, a hissing sound. The Wren had been fired. Every man held his breath. We remembered the warning that the Wren would seek out ANY sound.

An explosion. Had we hit the destroyer? No, there were more explosions, followed by a whispered command to rig for depth charges. Someone said something about an air attack.
http://tinypic.com/egtzds.jpg
It wasn€t close but the fact that planes were overhead meant that the enemy must know where we were.
http://tinypic.com/egtzkg.jpg

There was a single explosion. It sounded different from the depth charges. Someone whispered, €œThe Old Man got the destroyer!€
http://tinypic.com/egtzyd.jpg

The boat continued running silently €" we were still secured for depth charge attack. Somewhat later I heard what I now recognized as a torpedo tube being flooded €" this time from the bow torpedo room. Were there more destroyers? Though I didn€t know it at the time, the destroyer the Old Man had attacked had been hit by the Wren but only disabled. It was sitting dead in the water and the Old Man was finishing it off. Eventually, we heard the hiss of a torpedo being fired. The explosion signaled the end of our nemesis.
http://tinypic.com/egu05u.jpg

We continued to run submerged. I returned to my bunk.

When I woke up, we were surfaced. Each watch includes the crew of one of the FLAK mounts. The idea is that one gun will get manned immediately in the event that aircraft are spotted. After a light breakfast, I went topside for my turn.

Just after dawn I spied smoke on the horizon. €œShip spotted,€ I called out. €œBearing 105.€ The Watch Officer began to call out course changes. The masts appeared, then the superstructure. It was a small merchant vessel, now at 70. The Watch Officer ordered everyone below and we dived. I returned to quarters. There was no need for silence and so I could distinctly hear orders being given. One torpedo was fired at the ship and we scored.
http://tinypic.com/egu0hs.jpg

We again surfaced and I resumed watch. About 20 minutes later our radar warning sounded €" we were picking up emissions. I could make out an aircraft approaching €" very close to the Sun but still visible. It was a B-24. The FLAK crew was ordered aloft. Holtzer and I were already in position and were first to fire. Short bursts of our tracers were stitching the sky around and through the B-24, which began to smoke. I could distinctly see its bomb bay doors were open. By now, everyone was firing at the plane which presently burst into flame. Several small black shapes detached themselves from the bottom of the plane €" bombs! The plane was dead but the bombs weren€t €" a line of explosions marched toward the boat, bracketing it. Großman was nicked in the forearm by a splinter (€œa love tap€) but no one else was injured. It seemed we had come through the attack unscathed but that initial assessment proved wrong. When my watch had ended I found out that there had been some damage to the main induction. It wasn€t serious but it compromised the boat€s ability to dive deep. I hoped this wouldn€t be a problem in the future.

The Watch Officer came to tell me that I was going to be credited with the B-24 kill and that the Old Man was very pleased with my performance. €œKeep up the good work,€ he said.

I was in my bunk and we had been submerged for a €œsound check€ when I heard the SO announce that he had detected €œship sounds€, bearing 10. Over the next few minutes, the SO announced more sounds, including an escort. A convoy! The old man ordered surface €" we were going to attempt to get into firing position. It wasn€t my turn on watch so I stayed below.

We ran for something like 20 minutes and again submerged. The snorkel was deployed so we were being driven by our diesels. Ten minutes elapsed €¦ then another ten. During that time the Old Man ordered several course adjustments. Finally, we retracted the snorkel and went on the electric motors. €œAll quiet€ was ordered.

Whispered commands were issued periodically. Most of them I couldn€t make out. I did hear the word €œliner€ at some point. The Old Man was getting a solution on one of the passenger liners that the enemy used for troop ships. I also distinctly heard him say €œcorvette€. He seemed to be concerned about one of the escorts.

Finally, I heard the gurgling sounds of torpedo tubes being flooded. We were preparing to attack! And then €¦ nothing. The waiting became protracted €" more commands were whispered. The Old Man wanted to be sure of his shot.

There was the hiss of a torpedo being fired, quickly followed by another. Two torpedoes were away. After a short interval, another torpedo left the boat. A half-minute and the final torpedo was released. We began to dive. A couple of minutes went by and we heard an explosion.
http://tinypic.com/egu0pc.jpg

There was another explosion a bit later. Two of our torpedoes had struck home.

After the first explosion, the Old Man had gone to ahead one-third. We were turning and continuing to dive. As the boat began to creak, I recalled the damage we€d sustained in the air attack. I was startled by another explosion. I heard someone €" not the Captain €" say, €œWren.€ There was another hissing sound, then the Old Man order ahead slow.

It was very still €" a Silent Night. I realized it was Christmas Eve. Somehow, it had escaped me that tomorrow was Christmas. None of my crewmates had mentioned it. More sounds €" almost like an animal in distress. One of the old hands said it was the sound of bulkheads breaking. One of our targets was sinking.

Our escape was uneventful. There were no pinging destroyers and no depth charges. The Old Man knows his business.

I later found out that the Old Man had fired three torpedoes at a passenger liner: two T3€s and the FaT. There was a Corvette on the flank of the convoy closest to our position that was targeted with the homing torpedo. The sinking sounds were from the passenger liner. It is presumed that the homing torpedo sank the escort.

25 Dec 1943
Overnight, someone had put the branch of a tree in the control room and decorated it with paper ornaments. The boat had a Christmas Tree! Weather remained clear and we ran on the surface, which gave me something to do.

26 Dec 1943
I was standing watch when an enemy transport came into view and, just as before, I was first to see it. As before, the Watch Officer took over and conned the boat into position at which point the dive order was given. The Old Man let the Watch Officer make the attack. One torpedo, one kill.
http://tinypic.com/egu0wy.jpg

After an hour or so, we surfaced, and I returned to the bridge. Hardly had I taken up position when the radar detector sounded. An aircraft was coming from the SE. No doubt the ship had gotten off a distress signal after being attacked. The Old Man decided to engage. The Watch Officer had the con from the bridge €" he order ahead full and turned to put the boat broadside to the plane. Seated at the gun and without binoculars I could see that we weren€t engaging a single plane €"3 PBY€s were approaching in echelon. Considering the damage that a single B-24 had done before, I silently wondered if the Old Man had blundered. I put those thoughts out of my head and took aim on the lead PBY, which was commencing its attack run. As one, all three mounts opened up and the PBY disintegrated under our combined fire.

A second PBY was coming in from the stern €" the boat continued to turn but the front mount was unable to bear on it. The second PBY succumbed to our fire. Meanwhile, the third PBY had made a looping approach and was coming from our starboard side. The Watch Officer ceased turning and all three mounts engaged the approaching plane. It began to smoke and passed over the boat to crash several hundred meters away on our port side.
http://tinypic.com/egu16p.jpg

The quad 20€s definitely proved their worth!

27 Dec 1943
The weather turned bad sometime overnight. The boat was pitching violently and cold spray splashed over the bridge €" it was impossible to avoid some of it running in icy rivulets down the inside of our rain gear. In the first five minutes I was drenched. The Watch Officer noticed my discomfort and assured me that this was perfectly normal weather in the North Atlantic. The mild weather we had been experiencing was distinctly anomalous. Delightful, I thought.

The Captain dove the boat and took us down to where it was smooth and quiet €¦ and boring. I dried off as best I could but the boat was eternally damp. At least it wasn€t cold.

28 Dec 1943
More of the same bad weather. The Watch Officer assured me that the weather was actually quite good €" in fact, it was actually too good since the sky was mostly clear. €œIt€s good weather for the enemy. It€s best to attack when it€s a bit overcast.€ We did pretty well at the beginning of the patrol, I said. €œA skilled Captain can adapt. A moderate swell and overcast is really best, though.€ I deferred to the Watch Officer€s superior wisdom and experience in these matters.

29 Dec 1943
We had settled into a routine. Stand watch for several hours, then dive for a €œsound check€. Sometime around midday the wind died down and the swells moderated. The Old Man ordered the watch below and we snorkeled. Several of us played cards in the crew quarters.

A crash dive was ordered €" a plane had been spotted through the observation scope. After an hour we returned to periscope depth and resumed snorkeling.

Around the time I was getting ready to sleep, the SO sang out, €œHigh speed screw sounds, bearing 70, long range.€ Was it a destroyer? The Old Man had already turned in so the XO had the con and that was the question he asked. The SO hesitated and then said, no it was a freighter. The XO ordered all stop and we drifted. The SO listened intently and then began calling out contacts: an escort and more fast freighters. A convoy. Could we intercept? Almost in answer to my unspoken question, the SO started calling out contacts again €" they were approaching.

For the next few minutes the SO provided a steady stream of information. I looked down the corridor and saw the Navigator and XO hovering over the chart table. Finally, there was a quick conference between the two men and the XO ordered ahead standard and battle surface. The bulkhead hatches were closed and I was left to ruminate in the crew quarters.

Now running on the surface, we heard the voice of the Old Man over the intercom. A fast convoy had been detected and we were moving to intercept.

The hatch to the torpedo room opened. Conrad stuck his head in and said, €œAltmeier, you€re needed.€ Schr¶der had cut his hand rather badly and was reporting to the medic, so they were a man short. All of the torpedo drills I€d gone through were finally going to be put to the test.

The tubes were already loaded: Tube II had a FaT, Tubes I and III had T3€s, and Tube IV had a Wren. In reality, I was a supernumery since I wouldn€t be involved in any aspect of the firing. I was there only to fill out a billet.

The engine note of the diesels changed. We had gone to flank speed. The Old Man was gunning it.

The sense of speed was quite palpable as we made a starboard turn. I grabbed a stanchion for support. It was a protracted turn so it must have been a substantial course change. We had barely straightened when the Old Man dived the boat. The diesel note changed to a deep bass as we began to snorkel.

More waiting. Finally, the diesels went silent. The voice of the XO over the intercom said, €œAll quiet€. We were now moving slowly on our electrics. Conrad whispered, €œIt€s a westbound convoy €" that means it€s empty.€ I supposed Conrad was right. Better to hit the eastbound ones. Still every empty transport we sink is one less to carry cargo back to the Tommies.

Finally, the order came to set the torpedoes for the attack. The depth settings were all 11.5 meters. Deep. Another liner? I whispered the question to Conrad. €œProbably a large tanker,€ he responded.

More settings €" gyro angles and the FaT running distance was set to 1500 meters. That meant that if the FaT didn€t encounter its target within 1500 meters it would execute a €œladder search€ until its batteries ran down.

Tubes I through IV were flooded. The gurgling sound was definitely louder here in the torpedo room. More adjustments were made. There was a brief wait and then Tube IV €" the Wren - was fired. After a short time, Tube III. Another short wait and then, Tube II. I was expecting a salvo €" it appeared the Old Man had selected three different targets. I€m told that this is unusual.

Right after the third torpedo was fired we began to dive. As with the previous attack, when we heard the first torpedo impact, the boat€s speed was increased and I felt it began to turn. There was another explosion. That hissing sound again. Now I know that it is the sound that accompanies release of a decoy designed to confuse enemy ASDIC. It sounded as though two of the three torpedoes had hit. The third must have missed. I said this to Conrad. He held up his finger as though to admonish me and said, €œWait.€ Sure enough, there was another explosion. Conrad said that two of the torpedoes we had fired were capable of getting delayed hits and that had clearly happened in this case.

We had gotten at least one kill. The sounds of a ship sinking were quite audible. Now we were all bracing for depth charges.

I€ve heard all the stories about enduring depth charge attacks and I€m certainly not looking forward to the experience. It€s an experience that will have to wait: again, the Old Man eluded the escorts.

We continued all quiet for another hour and then began the process of going to periscope depth. The Old Man was looking to see if there were any damaged ships we could pick off. The sea was empty €" the convoy had moved on. I returned to the crew quarters and hit the bunk.

30 Dec 1943
An uneventful day. Remained surfaced, running ahead full. Reached our patrol zone sometime in the morning.

31 Dec 1943
Began my watch in the dark. When the sun came up, we dived and spent the day submerged. Snorkeled a couple of hours around local noon €" the Navigator shot the Sun using the observation scope.

Late afternoon the Old Man announced over the intercom that since we had only three torpedoes remaining and had sustained light damage, BdU was ordering us to return to base.

1 Jan 1944
Ran ahead standard all night. The Old Man was in a hurry to get back.

I actually slept through most of our last attack, which occurred in early morning darkness. It was made on a lone tanker. As I€ve been able to reconstruct it, the XO conducted the attack, firing a Wren from the stern tube that took out the tanker€s propellers or rudder or both.
http://tinypic.com/egu2o7.jpg

The tanker went dead in the water so we positioned for a coup de grace from the T3 still residing in Tube I. It hit and the tanker began to burn but remained afloat. The XO then fired the last torpedo, a Wren, from the stern. Another hit. I think it was the last hit that woke me up, though I€m a little foggy €" it may have been the cursing a few minutes later that did it. The tanker defiantly remained afloat and we had no way to further harm it. I asked Großman, who had been awake for the entire engagement, why we couldn€t just surface and board the tanker. €œWhy can€t we scuttle it?€ €œBecause, you silly ***, they€ll shell us with their deck gun.€ Großman doesn€t have a lot of respect for rank €" in any case it was a compelling argument.

2-4 Jan 1943
We cruised into St. Nazaire just before midnight on 3 January. The return had been completely uneventful €" fortunate since we were utterly defenseless. The next morning there were debriefings. Just after noon, the Old Man called me into his office. This time he looked up when I entered and he acknowledge my salute. €œAltmeier, I€m putting you in for a commendation. Good job.€ €œThank you, Captain,€ I responded. €œI€ve also awarded you and your FLAK crew 24 hours leave, effective immediately. Excellent job all around.€ I again thanked the Old Man and he dismissed me.

As I came out of the Captain€s office, I saw Großman lolling against a signpost, smoking a cigarette. €œGroßman,€ I called out, €œthe Old Man gave the FLAK crew 24 hours leave, starting now.€ €œThat€s good news,€ he responded lazily, cigarette dangling from his lips. We stood eyeing each other and then he reached into his pocket and pulled out a coin. €œSeaman€s Tavern?€ more of a declaration than a question. €œYvette,€ I said. He flipped the coin in the air and said, €œCall it.€ €œTails.€ The coin hit the sidewalk, rolled, and finally fell on its side. He peered at it. He didn€t have to say it €" I saw it was tails.

A knot in my chest that had been tightening through two weeks of boredom, tension, and raw fear began to uncoil for the first time €" two words summed the mood up perfectly: €œAh, Yvette.€ Großman clapped me on the shoulder and together we went to tell our comrades of their good fortune.

WilhelmSchulz.-
10-09-2005, 10:01 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gifBRAVO!!! Sounds like a chapter in Edward L. Beaches Submarine. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif U-Flack Cool. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Wolfen_U232
10-09-2005, 11:29 PM
****!!!!!!!

You should really write a book man.. Your writing and story skills are amazing..

Can't wait untill your next post lol

Dragos_Mateescu
10-10-2005, 12:19 AM
One of the best SH3 based stories on this forum. Good job man and of course - Keep up the good work! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

xefne
10-10-2005, 07:19 AM
Amazing work.

The_Silent_O
10-11-2005, 09:51 AM
in my last career I went for the triple Flak tower configuration. They look sooo top heavy cruising and diving

But unlike you, I choose the double 37s. for all three.

Your writing had me captivated...It could have been a chapter in "Das Boot"

paulhager
10-11-2005, 12:19 PM
Originally posted by The_Silent_O:
in my last career I went for the triple Flak tower configuration. They look sooo top heavy cruising and diving

But unlike you, I choose the double 37s. for all three.

Your writing had me captivated...It could have been a chapter in "Das Boot"

Thanks. Incidentally, a chapter two is on the way - it's currently in bits and pieces. I found the idea of writing something from the perspective of a crewman intriguing, particularly if he were a novice. To my knowledge no one else has attempted that.

I almost exclusively write non-fiction: mostly political, some technical. Have had two or three things published. I've only dabbled in fiction - it's a big committment in time with almost no chance of a payoff. One idea I've been kicking around for 10 years or so is a novel called "Frank Miller" which takes the movie HIGH NOON and recounts the events from the perspective of his character. Same idea as John Gardner's GRENDEL, which was a retelling of Beowulf from the perspective of the monster.

Regarding the twin 37's: how do you get 3 mounts? I only know how to get one.

The_Silent_O
10-11-2005, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by paulhager:
Regarding the twin 37's: how do you get 3 mounts? I only know how to get one.

I think the Quad 20s and the twin 37s are both considered 'Heavy' flak guns and are equally exchangable.

The next time you are in port...try trading one for one. I'm sure I had 3x2x37s mounted. (interesting to have the firepower equal of an early war anti-tank battery mounted on your U-boat!)

That's a great way to write. I'm sure it makes you do a lot research into all aspects of the historical environment.

paulhager
10-12-2005, 01:00 AM
Originally posted by The_Silent_O:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by paulhager:
Regarding the twin 37's: how do you get 3 mounts? I only know how to get one.

I think the Quad 20s and the twin 37s are both considered 'Heavy' flak guns and are equally exchangable.

The next time you are in port...try trading one for one. I'm sure I had 3x2x37s mounted. (interesting to have the firepower equal of an early war anti-tank battery mounted on your U-boat!)

That's a great way to write. I'm sure it makes you do a lot research into all aspects of the historical environment. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You are correct about the 37's. I clicked on each mount and then selected the twin 37's. Now I have 3 mounts. Dirty Harry should be in command of the boat: "Being as this is a 3.7 centimeter cannon, the most powerful U-FLAK in the world, and would blow your wing clean off, you've got to ask yourself a question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?" I'm juiced.

Incidentally, episode #2 tomorrow.

The_Silent_O
10-12-2005, 09:10 AM
Originally posted by paulhager:

You are correct about the 37's. I clicked on each mount and then selected the twin 37's. Now I have 3 mounts. Dirty Harry should be in command of the boat: "Being as this is a 3.7 centimeter cannon, the most powerful U-FLAK in the world, and would blow your wing clean off, you've got to ask yourself a question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?" I'm juiced.

Incidentally, episode #2 tomorrow.

You mean,...episode #2 with the Twin 37s or is that 37 DDs...who knows?..can't wait!

Clint Eastwood needs to make a guest appearence on the conning tower with a half eaten hotdog in his hand.

"Now did I fire 5 or 6 rounds...it really doesn't matter since my 37mm clip has 20!"

paulhager
10-12-2005, 01:08 PM
Originally posted by The_Silent_O:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by paulhager:

You are correct about the 37's. I clicked on each mount and then selected the twin 37's. Now I have 3 mounts. Dirty Harry should be in command of the boat: "Being as this is a 3.7 centimeter cannon, the most powerful U-FLAK in the world, and would blow your wing clean off, you've got to ask yourself a question: Do I feel lucky? Well, do ya, punk?" I'm juiced.

Incidentally, episode #2 tomorrow.

You mean,...episode #2 with the Twin 37s or is that 37 DDs...who knows?..can't wait!

Clint Eastwood needs to make a guest appearence on the conning tower with a half eaten hotdog in his hand.

"Now did I fire 5 or 6 rounds...it really doesn't matter since my 37mm clip has 20!" </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Neither 37, I'm afraid. We'll see how #2 goes. I'm having fun ... as long as you folks do too.

Upon reflection, I suppose there is a 37 (or the equivalent) but she's a very minor character. There will be an important female character in #2 and there's a little more with the Captain.

I'll run mission #3 -- with the 3 twin 37's -- and see if a story emerges. Could be everyone gets killed. Using the game as a framing device constrains things quite a bit but in a challenging way. Those familiar with crew names in the game will notice I've created some that don't exist. Otherwise, I pretty strictly follow the actual mission as it unfolds.

Had some very close calls in #2. I don't remember so many planes in previous careers. Could be that using a Type IX kept putting me in the middle of the Atlantic where there were no planes. Getting attacked by literally squadrons of aircraft is something new. I don't care how good your gun crew is, those numbers will kill you if you don't dive ... deep. If I didn't know better, I'd think the AI was learning. Wierd.

hans_langsdorff
10-12-2005, 05:56 PM
that was the coolist sh3 related story ive read. I think you should write a longer one. http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b354/hans_langsdorff1/logo3.jpg

paulhager
10-13-2005, 10:02 AM
Originally posted by hans_langsdorff:
that was the coolist sh3 related story ive read. I think you should write a longer one. http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b354/hans_langsdorff1/logo3.jpg

Thanks. I posted Episode 2 (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/857101043/m/9141086663) last night.

Already thinking of Episode 3 (I completed a third mission). I hope to write it up before I go on a business trip to Alaska next week.

hans_langsdorff
10-15-2005, 12:00 AM
they just keep geting better. Keep it up.

FinFury
10-15-2005, 06:01 AM
Well done really skilfully writed patrol diary.