PDA

View Full Version : DVD protection



Lewicide
05-11-2007, 05:24 AM
As an avowed opponent of many types of copy protection in the past, I would like to propose one that has worked well for me.

I recently purchased a relatively expensive, high end military simulation (not a game) of commercial professional quality.

The copy protection it used, involved the use of a USB dongle. A USB key that had to be in one of your USB ports to enable the sim to run.

I can make multiple copies of the sim and put them on all of my machines but can only run them one at a time with the dongle.

I don't need a CD/DVD to run it.

There are no invasive programs that need net connections for verification.

The only concern I have is the lifespan of the USB dongle.

It works so well (for me)

It's worth consideration .

Yskonyn23
05-11-2007, 07:26 AM
Without going into an endless debate about copy protections being of influence on sales (and no I don't throw a bone now, so please refrain! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif)

I assume you're talking about the program VBS (the professional version of Operation Flashpoint/Armed Assault)?

At first I saw this as a nice feature as well. You could just supply a dongle in the dvd case (just like there's space for a memory card with ps2 games in the case), but as I've come across pirated versions of this program as well it's just another thing that doesn't prevent piracy and still makes legit users jump through loops.

So I'd say a no-go.

joeap
05-11-2007, 07:35 AM
Steel Beasts also uses dongles. *Snicker* Well securom has never been a problem for me...hated SF though.

Lewicide
05-11-2007, 07:40 AM
No I do not refer to VBS or any of the derivatives of operation flashpoint.

The ADF has no pirated copies of this software around.

Yskonyn23
05-11-2007, 08:32 AM
It doesn't really matter what software we're talking about.
Even software with USB protection has been pirated, that's my point.

Huxley_S
05-11-2007, 09:47 AM
No kind of copy protection prevents piracy, it just serves to annoy and inconvenience legitimate users.

The best way to reduce piracy to a minimum is to include value added items to the retail item. In the case of software that means nicely designed manuals, posters, artwork, photos, tutorials, videos, music, keyboard overlays, stickers, limited edition keyrings / T-Shirts etc etc etc

-HH-Quazi
05-11-2007, 10:18 AM
Originally posted by Huxley_S:
No kind of copy protection prevents piracy, it just serves to annoy and inconvenience legitimate users.

The best way to reduce piracy to a minimum is to include value added items to the retail item. In the case of software that means nicely designed manuals, posters, artwork, photos, tutorials, videos, music, keyboard overlays, stickers, limited edition keyrings / T-Shirts etc etc etc I am not so sure about that. Sierra released Nascar Racing 2003 years ago and to this day the original disks are selling for $100 used because no one has ever figured out how to beat the copy protection. Sure, you can play it off line with a no-cd exe. But as far as I know, and this is from an extensive amount to reading & research, no one has ever been able to race online without an original disk.

Huxley_S
05-13-2007, 02:13 PM
But as far as I know, and this is from an extensive amount to reading & research, no one has ever been able to race online without an original disk.

This represents the best and simplest form of copy protection - a unique product key which you are unable to play online without. Not stuff that messes with your optical drives or surreptitiously installs nasty things on your hard drive.

You can't completely prevent software piracy or for that matter any kind of piracy of copyrighted material, dongle protected or otherwise. Even the latest HD DVD protection has been cracked. Think of how many millions were spent on that!

What you can do is encourage people to have a stake in the products they buy. That means value added. That's why as a teenager I'd save up all my money to buy Iron Maiden picture discs or a limited edition gate-fold sleeve.

When I buy software, it's not because I think it is stealing to do otherwise, but because I want a manual and I want to be able to sell it on when I'm done with it. That's the value added.

Back when I was a kid, going round to a mate's house with your latest records to make mix tapes was a way of life for teenagers. Today, you're public enemy number one if you swap digital music tracks. It's crazy.

For a game like IL2, I know that my money doesn't simply represent a purchase, but an investment. I know from experience that my money is going to be put towards future updates most of which will be free. Again it's the value added.

K_Freddie
05-13-2007, 03:29 PM
Dongles have been cracked since some guy walked on paving stones 5mm below the water surface http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Taylortony
05-13-2007, 04:10 PM
you can't beat a big dongle.................. I had a big one back in the days of my Commodore 64.....

antifreeze
05-13-2007, 05:58 PM
Dongles are a terrible protection system:

- they break or get lost eventually... try getting another one sent to you; it's very difficult and inconvenient.
- it's managable with one piece of software, but imagine if ALL your software each had its own dongle.

and apart from that, usually the software is cracked anyway, so it can be run without the dongle.

Yskonyn23
05-14-2007, 06:23 AM
Originally posted by Huxley_S:
No kind of copy protection prevents piracy, it just serves to annoy and inconvenience legitimate users.

The best way to reduce piracy to a minimum is to include value added items to the retail item. In the case of software that means nicely designed manuals, posters, artwork, photos, tutorials, videos, music, keyboard overlays, stickers, limited edition keyrings / T-Shirts etc etc etc

Indeed. What also helps is to only provide updates, bonus packs, etc on a website which can only be accessed by registering online with your key.

Also the multiplayer cdkey is a good issue, though I think about as many people only play offline, so they can then distribute the game without penalty.