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Fighterduck
02-20-2007, 07:35 AM
hi all!
i need an advise from RC pilots. I wanted to start to fly RC planes, but i dont have that much money at the moment, so i made a trip around some shops and i found this one http://www.parkzone.com/Products/Default.aspx?ProdID=PKZ1600
but lloking that im not an rc expert i dont know it it's good or not to start with...any idea?

thanks!

FlyFisher73
02-20-2007, 08:30 AM
There are two things I would recommend;

1) Look for a high wing trainer for your first airplane, the Fw190 might be a bit much for your first plane.

2) Join an RC club, they will teach you how to fly & maintain your stuff. You will spend more $$ in wrecked planes if you don't

p-11.cAce
02-20-2007, 09:05 AM
I love the parkzone aircraft - they are how I got into RC! I would NOT start with the Fw - my progression went: Slo-v, F27 Styker, typhoon, p-51. You can probably skip the Slo-v - never try to fly it in any wind! - and go straight to the Stryker. The styker is pretty hot (even the B model)and tip stalls if you get slow on the approach but otherwise is alot of fun. I could have done without the Typhoon but it looked fun (and is sometimes but does not have the "flow" of the Styker of the P-51. You could, in theory, start out with the Fw but the basic RC skills you get with the Slo-v (like "reversing" your orientation when the plane is pointed at you) are better learned at slow speed than fast. The quality of these aircraft are top notch for RTF and good gateway to RC without re-kitting a bunch of balsa. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif

RocketDog
02-20-2007, 09:15 AM
Good advice is to learn to fly with a model you are not too fond of. Learning involves quite a bit of crashing and it is heart-breaking to do it with something either a) expensive or b) beautiful. Save the Fw-190 until you have the skills mastered.

Cheers,

RD.

faustnik
02-20-2007, 09:48 AM
Originally posted by FlyFisher73:
1) Look for a high wing trainer for your first airplane

Great advice there! Start with low power and a large wing.

M2morris
02-20-2007, 09:52 AM
Ya, good advice, you should get a cheap(er) high-wing tricycle landing gear electric trainer with ailerons, and try to find a nice BIG field like the one in my vids here with me and one of my piper cubs. I'm not into clubs myself,I am self-taught, but you can also get an RC sim for your PC with an ISB plug for your radio.
I call this place RC Edwards. BTW the cubby is a good transition trainer to tail dragger, and the bigger the plane is the easier it is to fly. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/?actio...current=cub9july.flv (http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/?action=view&current=cub9july.flv)
http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/?actio...urrent=cub0606a1.flv (http://s20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/?action=view&current=cub0606a1.flv)

Altocirrus
02-20-2007, 10:15 AM
All sound advice so far. Choose something made out of 'epp'; this is a type of foam which, in my experience, is completely crash proof. To demonstrate it's toughness, I once saw a guy climb his epp flying wing until it was a dot in the sky, and send it in a vertical, full power dive onto tarmac. As if that wasn't enough, he got a guy to drive over it. He then picked it up, dusted it off, chucked it into the air again and off it went! Most commercial epp aircraft aren't quite this tough, but are more than capable of standing up to a beginner's abuse.

Mosey on down to these forums: http://www.rcgroups.com/ ; 'best beginner aircraft' crops up often and there's some great pointers. In particular, check out these ones:
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=357623
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?t=577137

You might also want to check this out: http://n.ethz.ch/student/mmoeller/fms/index_e.html
It's a free model flight simulator (get the alpha 8.5 version). If you have an analogue gamepad, you can configure it like an RC transmitter.

Good luck!

knightflyte
02-20-2007, 10:21 AM
Originally posted by RocketDog:
Good advice is to learn to fly with a model you are not too fond of. Learning involves quite a bit of crashing and it is heart-breaking to do it with something either a) expensive or b) beautiful. Save the Fw-190 until you have the skills mastered.

Cheers,

RD.


Worse than expensive was something you built by hand....(ei. not premade)

I built my first trainer, and was quite proud of it. I brought it to the field and for the first time, and was amazed at the response of people there. I was very surprized at how many said 'it is very beautiful' and 'Is this your first RC model?'

Well, I crashed it. Oh man was I upset. I was only 16.

The guy training me told me not to make one so pretty next time. LOL Oh well.

A high wing flat bottom airfoil would be the most stable to fly, Fighterduck. It will have an inate ability to correct itself it stalls (provided you have some height.)

All the other guys are correct. An FW is not a beginner plane. You'll end up discouraged and probably quit without it even being your fault.

I'd also reccommend something with a larger wing span. Six feet or wider will be very benificial when you're trying to determine the planes attitude. Is it coming toward you...away from you...upside down or rightside up?

Six feet seems pretty small when it's 500 feet away at 200 feet in altitude.

Fighterduck
02-20-2007, 10:59 AM
so..if i understand the mighty FW is too hight req for me at the moment right? oh sigh! it looked so beautifull...i have to admit that im soooooooooooo impatient to fly this one, or the p-51 or the spitfire...the problem was that im limited in money so if i spend for a more basic one, i dont know when i'll have the money gain for the Fw...(i mean..sigh the Slo-v look so crapp ^^ ) but i understand that i need to learn befor jump into the Fw...i got only a question about it.....it has not gears...uhm...how to land it without crash?

M2morris
02-20-2007, 11:22 AM
Originally posted by Fighterduck:
so..if i understand the mighty FW is too hight req for me at the moment right? oh sigh! it looked so beautifull...i have to admit that im soooooooooooo impatient to fly this one, or the p-51 or the spitfire...the problem was that im limited in money so if i spend for a more basic one, i dont know when i'll have the money gain for the Fw...(i mean..sigh the Slo-v look so crapp ^^ ) but i understand that i need to learn befor jump into the Fw...i got only a question about it.....it has not gears...uhm...how to land it without crash?
That FW looks like a hand-toss type Fighterduck, what you do is you get it running full throttle and throw it into the air with the radio in your non-throwing hand, or you have someone throw it for you. To land you just cut power and belly it in on grass. You could have someone show you how at a club field if its really what you want. Then when you get it down you can go to any grass field almost.

Fighterduck
02-20-2007, 11:40 AM
but to land the propeller must be horizontal or when you will hit the grass it can broke up no?

SergeVE
02-20-2007, 11:50 AM
Fighterduck ,

I very strongly recommend that you practice first with a model airplane simulator , before you attempt flying a real model airplane .
Remember , if you crash in the virtual world , you just have to push the 'refly'' button .
In the real world , it can mean total loss, or at best weeks of repairing .
( trust me , I've been there )

Go to your local hobby shop and ask for it .

The model airplane simulator comes in 2 versions :
A ) you connect your transmitter via a USB connection into your computer .
That is the best way , because from the start , you are training with the actual transmitter you use later on when you fly the real model airplane .
B ) some simulators come their own 'transmitter box ' , which is realy just an almost empty box with 2 sticks , trim , and some switches .
This also connects to the computer via a USB connection .

The bottom line is , you simply have develop the right reflexes , and 'feel'' for the model aircraft .
Remember , flying an aircraft sitting inside the ( virtual ) cockpit is totally different from flying an aircraft when you are outside , standing on the ground .
- when the aircraft comes towards you , left becomes right , and right becomes left
- when the aircraft is far away , visibility becomes more difficult : you easily get confused as to position of the aircraft ( is going to the left , or to the right , is it going away from me , or towards me , is it upside down or not )
- it is more difficult to judge the speed of the aircraft , when you are not inside the aircraft , remember , you have no instruments .
Judging the speed is vital when landing .

With a simulator you can practise flying , and especially landing , without going to the airfield , day and night , in any weather , at home , and you can try again , and again , and again , without burning any expensive model airplane fuel and without any damage to your model .

When you can fly with ease on a simulator , then you will have no trouble making the transition to flying a real model airplane .

Then there is also the difference between the rarther large joystick you use when flying IL2 , and the 2 small sticks on a transmitter .
It feels totaaly different .
I would also advise using 2 fingers for each stick , instead of just your thumbs .

In some model airplane clubs , elevator and roll are on different sticks .
I do NOT recommend this .
It is far better to have elevator and roll on 1 stick ( just as a real aircraft ) , because it is more intuitive and realistic . By the way , you are already flying in this way with IL2 right , so why learn a totally new set of reflexes , it will only confuse you .
You also have the benefit of temporarily being able to fly the aircraft with 1 hand , which is usefull when you are trimming the aircraft , or when you are activating the flaps , or the landing gear .
In other words , when you are controlling the 2 main axis of the aircraft ( roll and elevator ) with one hand , your other hand is free to do something else : activate the flaps , landing gear , set the trims , scratch your nose etc .

When you are learning to fly a model aircraft , it is vital that your learning stage is not interrupted by crashes ( repairing ), or long periods of bad weather .
In the beginning , you must fly regularly , otherwise your progress will be very slow indeed .
Long interruptions will have the effect of forgetting what you have already learned .
This is exactly what can happen if you start flying real model airplanes right from the start .
Now you have the chance of realy preparing yourself for it , with model airplane simulators .

If only I had that possiblity 20 years ago , it would have saved me a lot of time and a lot of money and frustration .

Spend a few months on a simulator first , you will not regret it .

Cheers

M2morris
02-20-2007, 12:02 PM
Originally posted by Fighterduck:
but to land the propeller must be horizontal or when you will hit the grass it can broke up no?
Sry SergeVE, I just want to answere this question real quick;
No, it wont hurt the prop when you land, they are designed for it, or on some planes the prop is hinged and folds back. But the radio transmitter that THAT FW comes with is not good if you plan to fly RCs for a long time.

Fighterduck
02-20-2007, 12:13 PM
Originally posted by SergeVE:



Remember , flying an aircraft sitting inside the ( virtual ) cockpit is totally different from flying an aircraft when you are outside , standing on the ground .
- when the aircraft comes towards you , left becomes right , and right becomes left

Cheers


now this is one of the primary thing i ever thought watching some rc pilots...msut not be natural to invert command....yeah, i think ill give a try to this sim...crashing a real plane is not for me...well not for my wallet ^^

FlyFisher73
02-20-2007, 01:12 PM
Originally posted by SergeVE:
Fighterduck ,

If only I had that possiblity 20 years ago , it would have saved me a lot of time and a lot of money and frustration .

Spend a few months on a simulator first , you will not regret it .



I too learned before the RC sim era, and I agree that a sim can save you lots of grief. I built a OS .40 SF powered, 72" span, high wing trainer in high school. I almost destroyed it on the first flight, and I was so afraid to fly it that it sat in the garage for 8 years until I joined a club for a summer to learn.

Now I fly RC floatplanes exclusively...they are just too cool! I am currently working (scratch building...slowly) on a Canadiar CL-415, then a Martin PBM Mariner, and someday a Grumman J2F Duck.

The electrics seem to be the way to go these days, now that battery technology is so good. You avoid the messy and expensive glow fuel, and electric motors are more user friendly. Personally, I like the sound of a 4-stroke too much to give that up.

That recommendation to get a trainer of at least a 6 foot span is a good one. The bigger planes have a little more mass behind them, and are less affected by turbulence. The smaller planes are hard to see and are more "squirrly" to fly.

Your head is probably spinning from all the info already, so the RC sim would be a good intro for you. Welcome to the hobby.

nickdanger3
02-20-2007, 02:19 PM
I was just gonna ask the same question FighterDuck.

Thanks for all the very useful responses !

FlyFisher73
02-20-2007, 02:29 PM
One thing I find useful to prevent disorientation when the model is flying at you is to remember to "move the aileron stick towards the low wing to level the plane"

This saved my bacon more than a few times.

Altocirrus
02-20-2007, 02:58 PM
I disagree that the simulator is the best way to go. By all means try one, but even the photorealistic ones (check out reflex xtr) fail to fully capture what it's like to fly an rc aircraft. If you start with slow, light, electric aircraft, there simply isn't enough mass behind it to cause damage to itself or anything it hits. Result= less repair time, fewer worries about upsetting other people, and the ability to fly at the local park rather than a designated flying site. All of which equate to more airtime, and a faster learning curve. Plus, it costs much less than a sim + a larger aircraft.

All of my aircraft have a wingspan of less than 3 ft, and a weight of less than 300g. And, in the 7 years I've been building and flying rc aircraft, I've never written one off; all of them could be ready to fly tomorrow. Yes, I've crashed them a few times, but they just don't break!

On the left/right coming towards you thing... that was never a problem for me. My dad bought me an rc car when I was 7 and I made all my mistakes on that http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif.

XyZspineZyX
02-20-2007, 05:11 PM
Ok...some simple math:

Beginner+PZ FW190+Not alot of money = grown man crying like a baby.

Do what the others tell you to do and get the FW when you are ready for it. Which means 3-4 planes down the road.

Scen
02-20-2007, 05:39 PM
One thing I would suggest is to stay away from some of these super beginner planes. Most of them don't have Aileron control and some don't even have elevator which are terrible to try and learn to fly.

I find the Elevator Rudder birds to be way less natural to fly also they are sloppy and take time to correct which leads to over correction.

You're best bet just to get the hang of things is use IL2 for a cheapo RC simulator. It does work and it will give you the concept of learning to fly from a 3rd person perspective.

Later look for a plane that has Aileron Elevator controls (like the Parkzone warbirds) The only issue with the PZ FW and 51 and soon to be released Spit is they take up quite a bit of room and they are pretty fast. Meaning you can get into trouble fairly quick. Also upgrading the Parkzones to Lipo Batteries is a big plus though it adds a lot of expense. There is a big difference in performance with Lipos.

The good news is the Lipos work with all the Parkzone Warbirds and they don't require an any sort of upgrade. You will need a charger and batteries aren't cheap. They also don't like being crashed so take er easy.

There are a couple beginner plane that claim they are for advanced flyers but they sport a big wing aspect and have elevator and Aileron control and fly real slow. That's what you want IMO.

Good luck

sunflower1
02-20-2007, 05:59 PM
I would lobby you to start with soaring, not powered RC flight.

1) MUCH cheaper. Your flight box will have a transmitter, some lead ballast, perhaps an extra battery pack and some lunch. No motor to buy, no vibration tearing up airborne components.

2) MUCH more instructive: when the sun is providing your energy, you'll learn to manage it well. In my opinion, soaring pilots fly with precision that only competitive power pilots usually attain.

3) The first time you land your sailplane because the airborne battery pack is dying you'll have a sense of accomplishment that alcohol and nitromethane, or a power switch, just can't provide.

4) Your model will never smell like model airplane fuel or leak on anything valuable...etc.

Get at least a 5 channel radio, flaps and or gear are cool and even a sailplane can use more than the basic 4 channels if its a fancy one.

Monterey13
02-20-2007, 08:44 PM
I want this one!!!!

http://www.rcuniverse.com/market/item.cfm?itemId=260902

Monterey13
02-20-2007, 09:15 PM
Here is an inexpensive starter plane for you. It even comes with a free sim kit.

http://cgi.ebay.com/PARK-FLYER-BRUSHLESS-4-CH-RC-AIRPLA...QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem (http://cgi.ebay.com/PARK-FLYER-BRUSHLESS-4-CH-RC-AIRPLANE-RTF-CESSNA_W0QQitemZ230093704710QQihZ013QQcategoryZ256 3QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem)

TgD Thunderbolt56
02-21-2007, 10:31 AM
For glowplug RC, I can sum it up in 2 words....Nexstar select.

http://www.hobbiconexstar.com/downloads/hcaa17-manual.pdf

The package is all-inclusive and contains a basic pc simulator as well. A great beginner aircraft.


TB

DHC2Pilot
02-21-2007, 11:37 PM
Much good advice here....but I have to put my 2 cents worth in. I've been flying RC for about 25 years now. My first airplane was a 1/2A Sure Flight Cub with a 39" foam wing. Yeah, I had dreams of flying the 1/3 scale Bud Nosen P-51 or a sexy pattern ship, but at 13 years old my dad and the guy at our hobby store had other plans. After crashing the cub at least a dozen times I moved on to two Sig Colts, a Midwest cardinal, then a Sig Kadet Sr. By the time I was 21 I bought a Super Sportster 60 (my first low wing airplane), and screwed it into the ground at about Mach 3. Believe me, low wing airplanes are a whole new game. I then built a Sig Astro Hog and flew it for about another 5 or 6 years. Then came the biplane and 1/4 scale ships that I have today. The whole point of this is that you WILL NOT be proficient at flying your first time out, your second time, or 20th time. It takes a LOT of crashing, rebuilding, and perseverence to succeed at this hobby. As many others have stated here, start out with a high wing, flat bottomed airfoil aircraft. I highly recommend the Sig Kadet Sr. It's big (72" inch wingspan), slow, easy to land, and very forgiving. With a larger engine (.40 2 stroke or .60 4 stroke), it is mildly aerobatic. You can do loops and barrel rolls (no ailerons) and get the hang of it before moving on to a low wing airplane. Just don't put the cart before the horse and go for your dream ship right away. All you'll end up with is a pile of splintered balsa and a bad feeling inside. Trust me, I've crashed enough for both of us. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

RedDeth
02-22-2007, 12:01 AM
ive been flying RC for years. and out of hundreds and hundreds of new rc pilots no one has ever started out with a fighter plane like a fw.

and NO ONE starting out would ever be able to fly one. the learning curve is so hard you wouldnt be able to get it airborne.

you might get it into some kind of crazy uncontrolled take off flying sideways and it would immediately crash but i doubt you would even get it up into the air high enough to crash. and once you eventually ever did by sheer luck get it in the air up high it would just be a missile going into someones car or a person watching or something of the sort.

you cant start with a fw. it cant be done. not even a space shuttle pilot with a genious IQ could achieve that goal.

start with a trainer rtf and then move on to a stick.... heck ive yet to fly a low wing fighter and i love em.

as my sensei used to say... you cannot win a sumo match until you have eaten thousands of meals of preparation....

Fighterduck
02-22-2007, 04:38 AM
oh sigh....i think my beloved fw will have to wait me for sooooooooooooo long! ^^
Ok: so form all you adivces i understand that:
- An hight wing,slow, trainer is what i need to start
- An rc sim would be helpfull
- Maybe an Rc club would also be helpfull to teach me the basic
- ...i will spend tons of time reparing my plane bacasue of my tons of crash ^^

just another question please. I surfed on the net to look for rc models but there are hundreds of name out there...which are the most knew? i mean i dont wanna to planes that will fall in pices in the first fly. Have you got some for starter and for the future for good ww2 rc planes?

thanks again all

FlyFisher73
02-22-2007, 04:46 PM
You don't nessessarily have to crash alot. I have wrecked only one plane in my ten years of flying (hit lake at bottom of split-S..not good). Just like flying full-sized planes...properly maintain your equipment and leave yourself options in the air when you get into trouble.

There are a bunch of good ARF (almost ready to fly) trainers out there. Check out Tower Hobbies...which has tons of stuff. An electric motor, four channel radio(throttle, rudder, aileron, elevator) would be ideal.

Track down someone who can get you set up and show you how to fly. You can learn on your own, but it will cost you $$$ and frustration.

M2morris
02-22-2007, 05:03 PM
Well, I hate to do this you guys because it has been beaten to death already but, here's how I learned to fly RCs:
In 1994 I bought a 2 meter glider called a Goldberg gentle lady, I had never flown RC in my life,I built the glider in about a month and did a beautiful job on it. The radio I bought was a Futaba attack four. Well, the big day came to try it out, so after I had it all trimmed and balanced I took it to a football field and just tossed it into the wind a bunch of times, I did some rough landings, and after about 10 throws it hit a small tree. Next day after repairing the wing, I did some more throwing, after a while I was getting pretty good at controlling it. I went and found a nice hill top with no trees around, and I tossed it into the wind, after about 20 tosses, and to my amazement, I finally got it to do a 360 degree turn around and back to me on the hill. I was ecstatic. I had tought myself to fly. I got to the point were I was throwng it with all my might up into the wind and turning it around and landing it as near as possible. Then came the hi-start string launches about a week later and I was hooked. My glider, with some repair patchwork here and there, was catching thermals 300 or 400 feet up at times, and even higher. Later I bought another glider and I put ailerons on it, and I learned that the same way, and then came the Wright Flyer 60T high-wing tri-landing gear trainer. I now am into piper cubs and gliders, and I still have that first glider's wings. The fuselage was destroyed after I designed and built my own wing for it and the main spar failed after launching in too high of wind, worked good for a while. After seeing the model gliders rise and speck-out in thermals it got me interested and I eventually got into flying full-scale gliders too.
End of transmission.

DHC2Pilot
02-22-2007, 05:06 PM
You got the idea....high wing, flat bottomed airfoil, the bigger the better (easier to see when it gets farther away). And yes, definately join an R/C club. There are always members there who will be more than happy to take the time to teach you the basics. Some other advice - when purchasing a radio, try to look for models that have a "buddy box" feature - this is a cord that can connect two radios together so that if you get yourself into a bad position the other guy can take over and recover for you. My radio is about 10 years old, but I think most of the new models have this feature as standard. As far as which models you should try, well, like you said there are so many it's hard to choose. If you've never built anything made of balsa, you might want to look for something made of styrofoam. They build up fast, and are much easier to repair. You can paint them which means you don't have to worry about using monokote or some of the other covering films which must be ironed on. Using film covering is an education in and of itself. Also, remember that your first few airplanes are going to be trainers. Don't worry about spending a fortune on a top of the line radio. You can get a really nice 4 channel radio for about 200 dollars (US). An engine (.20 - 40 size 2 stroke) will run about 50 to 75 dollars. Then there are all the accessories which will run another 50 to 100 depending on how much comes with the kit. We're talking about tires, pushrods, connectors, fuel tank, gas line, etc. The aircraft itself will probably run in the neighborhood of 75 to 100 dollars for a trainer. So, for about 450 dollars you're off and running. There are other things to buy when you're ready, a flight tote, starter, glow plug battery, etc. etc., but you can improvise at first and get the fancy stuff later.
One other option would be to purchase an airplane which someone else has built, then install your own radio. Most hobby stores which cater to the R/C crowd will have several "pre-driven" airplanes hanging from the ceiling. You can check these out and talk with the salesperson to see which ones would be good for a beginner like you. The more information you get BEFORE you start the better. R/C has a tendency to be a very expensive hobby, so start out right and make it a lasting experience.
GOOD LUCK!!!

Viper2005_
02-22-2007, 05:11 PM
I taught myself to fly with R/C a zagi. I then progressively upgraded it with ever bigger brushless motors.

Eventually I ended up with an AXI2820/10 and 10 nicads. It was very very fast. Unfortunately it failed in flutter during a high speed pass. Very spectacular stuff, and an excellent demonstration of exactly why one should never fly high performance aircraft in close proximity to innocent bystanders.

The prop and wing were trashed, but the motor and batteries were fine since they landed on heather.

I'll probably put them into a new aeroplane at some point.

In the meantime I have a Wingwarrior raider with a brushless motor, which is rather tame after the hotrodded zagi but has the advantage of being much less likely to suffer an in-flight structural failure.

***

The key point is that if you buy a wing made of EPP (or at least fitted with an EPP leading edge) the chances are that <span class="ev_code_red">when</span> you crash it, it will bend rather than break.

The second key point is that it is very important to cover the top and bottom of your aeroplane in material of different colours!

The third, and most important point is to remember that R/C aeroplanes are potentially deadly weapons and must be treated with respect. Even small props can cause horrific injuries (including amputation of digits), so again, respect is mandatory.

Be careful in selecting your flying location; remember that people are quite unpredictable, and will often be attracted to your aeroplane, which can cause potentially dangerous situations.

***

Have fun! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Spinnetti
02-22-2007, 08:47 PM
Get a slowstick... (GWS)

Great to learn on, and still fun when you have skills. For a long time it was always the first plane I flew if nothing else, just to test the wind and "warm up"..

Also, you can't beat electrics.

Go hear to learn a bunch
http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/index.php

Best of the bunch is my Flying Styro models FW190 A8. Flies great and looks awesome.
I also have a twin ducted fan Me262, and Me109, a Fokker DVII, F-82, A P47 etc, etc... But I like the german WWII stuff the best.

Fighterduck
02-23-2007, 02:56 AM
oh man so many advices here! Thanks to all...well i think i got what i need now..but still a very last question ( sorry ^^ ): is there a big difference flying "real model plane" from "wing planes" ...uhm...i mean, i saw some rc models that in fact a a big wing with a prop.Pretty hard to destroy and very fast...my question is is those things a more easy to fly than a real replica

Fighterduck
02-23-2007, 02:59 AM
Originally posted by Spinnetti:



Best of the bunch is my Flying Styro models FW190 A8. Flies great and looks awesome.
I also have a twin ducted fan Me262, and Me109, a Fokker DVII, F-82, A P47 etc, etc... But I like the german WWII stuff the best.


man those looks awesome!

ploughman
02-23-2007, 03:00 AM
This might've been suggested but if youset yourself up a static camera at ground level (think 10m is as low as you can go)and cycle through to it using the ctrl F2 you'll be able to simulate flying your plane as an RC pilot would. This might give you a head start on reversing the controls when the planes coming at you and stuff.

DHC2Pilot
02-23-2007, 04:56 PM
Stay away from anything that is "Fast"....seriously, you may WANT something that is fast, but what you really NEED is something that is slow. It will give you far more time to react when the plane ends up in a strange attitude. Get involved with a local R/C club and talk to the "old timers". They'll steer you in the right direction. Please don't let temptation take over and try to make the decisions on your own. You NEED someone who will take the time to teach you the basics, and after you have a few dozen successful flights under your belt then you can start to pursue more advanced aircraft.

Viper2005_
02-23-2007, 05:08 PM
Whatever you do, unless you like building stuff, start out with something that will bounce rather than break!

I'd seriously suggest an EPP wing.