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the_pool_guy
02-02-2005, 08:16 AM
Hey All,

Just wondering if you guys can be of assistance. I am currently researching a series of comic-strip inspired novels where the German forces - when invading Russia - are joined by the Romanians. I'd like to ask you all some basics that I and the writer may have overlooked and I'd very much like to get the technical data spot-on. For example, I don't want to see a character described as a Stuka fighter pilot.

So, here it is...

Would you know of the Russian, German and Romanian weaponry at the outbreak of hostilities? I am after the exact specifications of aircraft as well as tanks, rifles, machine guns and pistols. The same goes for grenades and so on. Also, some basic trivia in the opening days of the invasion such as the number of Russian aircraft destroyed on the ground... Famous aces at the time...

That sort of thing.

All assistance would be very much appreciated.

Jay

the_pool_guy
02-02-2005, 08:16 AM
Hey All,

Just wondering if you guys can be of assistance. I am currently researching a series of comic-strip inspired novels where the German forces - when invading Russia - are joined by the Romanians. I'd like to ask you all some basics that I and the writer may have overlooked and I'd very much like to get the technical data spot-on. For example, I don't want to see a character described as a Stuka fighter pilot.

So, here it is...

Would you know of the Russian, German and Romanian weaponry at the outbreak of hostilities? I am after the exact specifications of aircraft as well as tanks, rifles, machine guns and pistols. The same goes for grenades and so on. Also, some basic trivia in the opening days of the invasion such as the number of Russian aircraft destroyed on the ground... Famous aces at the time...

That sort of thing.

All assistance would be very much appreciated.

Jay

Friendly_flyer
02-02-2005, 08:40 AM
Some infanterist trivia:

The basic German infantry arm was the bolt action Mauser rifle carbine, Car-98 in 7,92 mm calibre. It was a very good reliable gun, but the recoil tended to be bad, and the German soldiers was not generally noted for their good shooting (the rifle kicked a bit too hard). The rifle was loaded with clips holding 5 rounds.

The Russian rifle was the Mosin-Nagant, as somewhat less reliable design. Though a fine gun in trained hands, it had the draw-back that it was possible to reassemble it incorrectly in a way that made the gun dangerous to the shooter. At the outbreak of operation Barbarossa, the Russians were short on everything but raw recruits, with the result that a few was lost to accidents. The rifle was longer than the Mauser, and fired a rimmed 7,62 mm calibre round from a single stack, 5 shot magazine (the same round is still used in the modern Dragunow sniper rifle). The single stacking made the magazine poke down beneath the stock so that the lower part could be seen in front of the trigger guard.

Luftwaffe_109
02-02-2005, 02:40 PM
Rumania


Background: 1940 was a horrible year for Rumania. Not only did it see the collapse of her traditional ally, France, but Rumania lost the territories of Bessarabia and Bukovina to the Soviet Union, half of Transylvania to Hungary and southern Dobrudja to Bulgaria.

The King abdicated in favour of his son and Gen. Ion Antonescu became the leader of Rumania (the Conducator).

Antonescu reasoned that, only by allying himself with Germany, could his nation regain her lost territories. He thus signed the Tripartite Pact and requested that German troops be stationed in Rumania to protect her neutrality. The Germans agreed (understanding the strategic importance of Rumania's oil), and even supported Antonescu in an attempted coup by Rumania‚‚ā¨ôs own indigenous fascist party, the Iron Guard.

Thus, Rumania‚‚ā¨ôs reasons for going to war with the Soviet Union consisted of both considerations for regaining her provinces from the Soviet Union and for upholding her responsibilities as an Axis nation (which, as I have stated before, was primarily in order to safeguard her frontiers from her own neighbors, including the Axis nations Hungary and Bulgaria). During the war in the east there was certainly enmity between Rumania and Hungary (despite the fact that they were Axis allies) and at Stalingrad an Italian army was placed between the Rumanian and Hungarian ones on the front lines because of this. Indeed, it would seem that, when Rumania was forced to join the Allies in 1944 (realising that the war was hopeless), her troops showed remarkably more enthusiasm in fighting Hungary then they had had during the war with the Soviet Union.

Organisation: In 1939 there was one Guard division and 21 Infantry divisions. Three Infantry divisions were disbanded after the territorial losses of 1940 meaning that 18 were ready for the invasion in 1941. Rumania would thus provide the largest army of Germany‚‚ā¨ôs Axis allies on the Eastern Front.

Training and tactics reflected French ones (as per their traditional ties) but, in October 1940, they began training with German methods.

Equipment:

Czech 7.92mm rifle replaced the 6.5mm Mannlicher (many of which nonetheless continued to be in use during the war with the Soviet Union) in the 30s.

Czech ZB30 was adopted as the squad light machine gun in the 30s.

Antitank capability: Severely limited, though some captured 47mm Guns were given to them by Germans.

Artillery: Most were of First World War era, supplemented by some French and Polish 75mm Guns.

Mountain Corps received Skoda artillery.

Armour: The single armoured brigade of the Rumanian forces used 126 Skoda LTvz 35 tanks, with some CKD R-1 tankettes for reconnaissance as well as 75 Renault R-35 light tanks, and some Renault FT-17 light tanks (for training). Later in the war it was equipped with PzKpfw 38(t)‚‚ā¨ôs from Czechoslovakia and PzKpfw IV‚‚ā¨ôs.

Hope some of this helps