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squadldr76
07-10-2006, 07:05 PM
Ok, I've wondered about this and it's been driving me nuts. I've done a search and have turned up zilch. So, I'll ask here...

Firstly, England used the metric system during the war, right? If so, how come some of the gauges on the Spitfires and the Hurricanes use the imperial system. Mainly, I see this in the speedometer, displying MPH instead of KPH. Were these gauges simply manufactured over here and shipped? What's the deal?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

berg417448
07-10-2006, 07:08 PM
Not sure they used metric. When I think about all of the RAF biographies I've read I'm pretty sure that all the speed and altitude references were in MPH and feet instead of metric.


Spitfire altimeter in feet:

http://warbirdsite.com/spitfirealtimeter.jpg

squadldr76
07-10-2006, 07:10 PM
Really? I've always thought that Americans were the only ones who used the imperial system.

interesting...

berg417448
07-10-2006, 07:12 PM
It is called Imperial because the British invented it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Imperial_unit

vocatx
07-10-2006, 07:22 PM
If you fly Japanese aircraft, you will discover they used TWO measurement systems. On Japanese Navy aircraft, they used knots per hour for airspeed, and meters for altitude. IJA aircraft used kilometers per hour for airspeed, and meters for altitude.

Some US aircraft used knots, and others used miles per hour, but all use feet for altitude.

It can get confusing sometimes, especially if you are flying with someone who uses the speed bar instead of the aircraft instruments.

Tintookkie
07-10-2006, 07:53 PM
I think Britain and its Commonwealth used the imperial measurment system during WW2.

JG53Frankyboy
07-10-2006, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by vocatx:
If you fly Japanese aircraft, you will discover they used TWO measurement systems. On Japanese Navy aircraft, they used knots per hour for airspeed, and meters for altitude. IJA aircraft used kilometers per hour for airspeed, and meters for altitude.

Some US aircraft used knots, and others used miles per hour, but all use feet for altitude.

It can get confusing sometimes, especially if you are flying with someone who uses the speed bar instead of the aircraft instruments.

but he could toggle the speedbar measurements http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Hashmark13
07-10-2006, 07:58 PM
I knew they did at the time, but do they still? Not in aircraft, but in general.

IL2 is the first flight sim i've ever played. The speeedbar defaults to metric, and so i think im one of the few americans who prefers metric over imperial.

danjama
07-10-2006, 08:04 PM
Yes we still use feet and mph

berg417448
07-10-2006, 08:04 PM
Originally posted by Hashmark13:
I knew they did at the time, but do they still? Not in aircraft, but in general.

IL2 is the first flight sim i've ever played. The speeedbar defaults to metric, and so i think im one of the few americans who prefers metric over imperial.

I'm pretty sure that most everyone uses knots now for marine and for aviation purposes.

squadldr76
07-10-2006, 08:09 PM
Personally, I'm not a big fan of using the speed bar. There's a certain thrill of immersion I get from having to read the actual gauges. Which is why I love the TrackIR so much. Makes it very easy to just glance down quickly to check my situation.

Thanks for the answers, guys. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

JG53Frankyboy
07-10-2006, 08:13 PM
Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Hashmark13:
I knew they did at the time, but do they still? Not in aircraft, but in general.

IL2 is the first flight sim i've ever played. The speeedbar defaults to metric, and so i think im one of the few americans who prefers metric over imperial.

I'm pretty sure that most everyone uses knots now for marine and for aviation purposes. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

the russians for sure not in aviation, they still use km/h and meters.

VW-IceFire
07-10-2006, 08:23 PM
Originally posted by squadldr76:
Really? I've always thought that Americans were the only ones who used the imperial system.

interesting...
The only ones who continue to use the Imperial system yes...pretty much everyone with good sense switched long ago http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

But not that long ago. RAF aircraft definately use the Imperial system. Not sure when Britain made the switch to metric.

Alot of aviation standards are still in imperial. Canada is a mostly metric country and yet all aviation stuff is done in imperial. Largely thanks to our southern neighbors otherwise things would be a bit easier.

berg417448
07-10-2006, 08:41 PM
Originally posted by VW-IceFire:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by squadldr76:
Really? I've always thought that Americans were the only ones who used the imperial system.

interesting...
The only ones who continue to use the Imperial system yes...pretty much everyone with good sense switched long ago http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

But not that long ago. RAF aircraft definately use the Imperial system. Not sure when Britain made the switch to metric.

Alot of aviation standards are still in imperial. Canada is a mostly metric country and yet all aviation stuff is done in imperial. Largely thanks to our southern neighbors otherwise things would be a bit easier. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


That kilograms / pounds of fuel conversion did cause a bit of problems for the crew of the Gimli Glider didn't it!

Friendly_flyer
07-11-2006, 03:44 AM
I just flew from Iceland to Norway (two very staunch supports of the metric system) two days ago, and the pilot still called out the height in feet. I'm not sure about speed, but at least height is always still given in feet rather than meters.

Taylortony
07-11-2006, 02:25 PM
To answer your question the UK uses Imperial full stop.

Nick_Toznost
07-11-2006, 07:48 PM
Britain is still mostly Imperial, but we're meant to be Metric by European law. There are people that have been prosecuted for trying to sell fruit & veg in Imperial, or so I've heard.

Imperial is Roman in origin isn't it? I dunno. I've been on the booze.

For people of my generation, in their 20s, we have neural pathways set both ways. Taught Imperial by our parents, learnt metric in School. Generation X.

Napoleon invented metric. A metre is a certain exact fraction of the distance from the North Pole to the Equator.........but he (or his staff) got it wrong. So the world is stuck with the metre (or meter)

As a citizen of a nation that thrashed Napoleon at Waterloo I don't know why were so half-metric.

I'm surprised that the U.S. is less metric inclined than most.....after all you and the Frenchies were quite close at that time....