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XyZspineZyX
04-03-2006, 09:39 AM
Wondering if any people of the forums train in martial arts? I include all forms when I ask this, Western boxing, wrestling, fencing ect ect

Capt.LoneRanger
04-03-2006, 09:41 AM
I used to do some Karate, quite a while back. Now I do medieval swordfights http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif

XyZspineZyX
04-03-2006, 09:51 AM
Wow

Over here in Australia we have a group of people who do this. They call themselves "The Grey Company". They do the same thing, wear the armour & recreate medievil duels & battles. There is alot unsaid & lost in the Western martial arts.

Monty_Thrud
04-03-2006, 09:53 AM
Black belt in Origami here...


so don't annoy me or i'll fold you into a Newt... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Capt.LoneRanger
04-03-2006, 09:55 AM
Yes, there are several groups like this in Australia. I have an email-friend who lives in the south-east.

We also wear chain-mails and stuff, but we're not organized - just a group of friends visiting medieval festivals and historic reenactments.

Capt.LoneRanger
04-03-2006, 09:57 AM
Black belt in Origami here...


Yeah, I have the green spoon in the 3rd yogurt, too.

XyZspineZyX
04-03-2006, 11:30 AM
I have been involved in martial arts since I was 16.
I trained in Korean TaeKwondo & achieved 1st Dan. I then got involved in "backyard" training with a farmer who trained in Shotokan Karate & who worked the doors at the pubs, he taught me an enormous amount about realistic technique & having an open mind. I then studied some Kickboxing & boxing & then moved onto Thai boxing & have stuck with that. I really enjoy training, it keeps you fit & is good for the mind. I mainly train by myself at a martial arts gym in the town I live in because of my shiftwork.

Lucius_Esox
04-03-2006, 11:36 AM
Judo Dan grade.. Won medals in area championships where I live, England.

So many old injuries that cause me grief now that if I tried to throw anybody I would be the one that ended up in hospital http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

russ.nl
04-03-2006, 11:39 AM
Medievil in Australia http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Deedsundone
04-03-2006, 12:45 PM
Does fistslamming your keyboard once in a while count as martial arts....

LStarosta
04-03-2006, 12:59 PM
Running is a martial art, except you are your own adversary and punching bag.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

And yes, I am completely serious.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

Owlsphone
04-03-2006, 01:06 PM
Originally posted by LStarosta:
Running is a martial art, except you are your own adversary and punching bag.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

And yes, I am completely serious.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

I'll agree with you. However, it can be said with just about any athlete.

major_setback
04-03-2006, 01:09 PM
I have a black belt.



It's leather I think.

StellarRat
04-03-2006, 01:19 PM
Since we are all here to play and talk about a WARgame doesn't that make us all martial artists?

CMHQ_Rikimaru
04-03-2006, 01:21 PM
Well, I was training kyokushinkai and shotokan for about 5 years. Now im training taijiquan alone, i train it only about year, but i think i will do this until end of my lifehttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Im still searching a teacher...

LStarosta
04-03-2006, 01:21 PM
Originally posted by Owlsphone:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LStarosta:
Running is a martial art, except you are your own adversary and punching bag.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

And yes, I am completely serious.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

I'll agree with you. However, it can be said with just about any athlete. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

True but I have yet to play a sport whose meditative qualities surpass those of a decent 10 mile run. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

It's a lifestyle, after all. All we need now is lightsabers.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

iroseland
04-03-2006, 01:42 PM
hmm,

Its been a while
Did Ninpo for a while

http://www.futendojo.com/

It was an awsome school.

I wish I had time for it these days, but heck I dont have time to go to the range even. 8^(

BSS_AIJO

russ.nl
04-03-2006, 01:49 PM
Almost black belt Sudoko

SeaFireLIV
04-03-2006, 01:57 PM
Karate, but only a Yellow belt so far....

GreyBeast
04-03-2006, 02:09 PM
My name is Arthur Marshall, does that count?

ImpStarDuece
04-03-2006, 03:19 PM
Did street Capoeira for about 18 months but never pursued anything formally.

JarheadEd
04-03-2006, 04:59 PM
I have a purple and pink polka dot belt in "Noh Kan Du" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

J_Anonymous
04-03-2006, 05:50 PM
Did Kendo for 10 years from age 10 to 20, and "retired" from the rough sport with 3rd-Dan. My jaw was damaged probably because of repeated hits on my throat protector by the tip of bamboo sword ("Tsu-ki") over 5 years (throat attack is dangerous and banned for players younger than 15 years old). My doctor did not allow me to eat anything solid (meat, uncooked vegetable, toasted bread, etc.) for 1 year. Tennis would have been more useful in meeting girls and such, but it was too late when I realized. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

edit - actually I had to take Judo classes for 3 years, too, once a week, in high school. Kendo or Judo is compulsory in high school for all male students in Japan (but high school education itself is NOT). My high school had a Judo teacher. A good looking female classmate insisted to join the Judo team of the highschool for the first time in school history (Female Judo was still extremely rare those days, it was not for Olympic games yet), and boys had troubles in ground fighting with her ("Ne-wa-za", you lie on the tatami mat and take the oppoment's joint etc., like wrestling). She would get mad if boys hesitate to have body contacts http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif. (OK, I admit, Kendo team members were envious for the Judo team guys.)

WWSensei
04-03-2006, 06:28 PM
With a callsign like mine what do you expect? ;-)

Been studying since I was 17. 3rd Dan TKD, 1st Dan Soo Bak Do. Also study Teoul Moon Kung Fu but there are no ranks in that style...just "student" and "teacher" and I'm defintely a "student".

Add in assorted hours in ninjitsu, jujitsu and akido, but nothing formal...just learning different holds, escapes, locks etc from friends.

Don't do it as much these days and haven't run a school since 1995, but I still try and hit the bag when I can. Competed in USKA, NCAA and the old PKA back in the 80s and 90s.

AKA_TAGERT
04-03-2006, 09:05 PM
Originally posted by Capt.LoneRanger:
Now I do medieval swordfights http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif That is top shelf nerding imho

nealn
04-03-2006, 11:11 PM
I have 2 black belts (2nd dan) in Taekwondo. Last trained in that about eleven years ago. I still go through my katas and hit the bag. Since then I have also studied Kung Fu for a year or two. Lately I have trained in jujitsu to get some basic ground skills.

I think all of the martial arts styles have something to offer and see this as a lifetime journey. I will likely try other styles in the future.

Next to flight simulators, it is one of my favorite forms of recreation. The martial arts really do build strenght and character, and are agreat way to stay in shape for an old (soon to be 50, guy like me).

Neal

LEBillfish
04-03-2006, 11:16 PM
I first tried "chalk", then "oils", both giving me so much trouble I tried just plain pencil to draw Martial.......

So doing all poorly I guess I'm not much of a "martial artist" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

WOLFMondo
04-04-2006, 12:36 AM
Originally posted by AKA_TAGERT:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Capt.LoneRanger:
Now I do medieval swordfights http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/winky.gif That is top shelf nerding imho </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The guy I share a house with does his medieval 'living history'. Yes, he is a nerd, or geek, he prefers to be called.

Siwarrior
04-04-2006, 12:45 AM
well i dont know if this counts as martial arts but i do boxing at the Gym.
great for keeping you fit, alert an dready next time u need to crack someone in the face ( joking) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Capt.LoneRanger
04-04-2006, 12:53 AM
quote:
Originally posted by Capt.LoneRanger:
Now I do medieval swordfights Winky

That is top shelf nerding imho


That's what most people think of people playing PC-games, too. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

KIMURA
04-04-2006, 01:11 AM
2nd Dan Shotokan-Karate-Do - S.K.I.

civildog
04-04-2006, 03:25 AM
Fencing: sabre and foil for 20 years. Not competing anymore but I racked up awards and was Class-A back in the day. Nowadays I save my knees for running and biking.

HotelBushranger
04-04-2006, 04:33 AM
About 4 years of Tae Kwon Do, got up to brown belt (which apparently isn't around anymore so noone believes me http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif)

CivilDog, a good mate of mine is part of my states under 18 fencing team. I think she does epee and foil.

XyZspineZyX
04-04-2006, 06:28 AM
Originally posted by Siwarrior:
well i dont know if this counts as martial arts but i do boxing at the Gym.
great for keeping you fit, alert an dready next time u need to crack someone in the face ( joking) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Of coarse boxing is a martial art, just like wrestling is. Alot of people associate martial arts with the Orient, As far as I am concerned they developed all over the world in all places. Europe & the middle east in the middle ages was a battleground where swordsmanship & unarmed combat would have been developed specifically for war. Boxing & wresting are 2 very efficient combative systems.

XyZspineZyX
04-04-2006, 06:34 AM
Got my 1st dan in Shotokan Karate, but havent trained in over 4 years. Guess if I go back I'll be downgraded to yellow belt or something...

crazyivan1970
04-04-2006, 06:35 AM
Done some of that in high school... looong time ago http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Lucius_Esox
04-04-2006, 07:09 AM
Someone posted is boxing a martial art,,, h*ell yes http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I suppose it's semantics really but what does martial art mean. I suppose literally translated "war art"

I think war arts that don't do "full real" lol are not as effective in the real world imho.

A good indicator to see how effective your chosen art is would be to pick a brawl at your local bar Friday/Saturday night http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Kata's look wonderfull and I always admired the skill and dedication it took to perform them. But how effective would they be when you have got a 23year old 190pound ar*hole charging at you with intent to tear you a new one,,, hehe..

I know the first rule of martial arts is to make sure you fight to your own advantages so maybe you wouldn't do the above, (sic) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif. But these things do happen,, then certain systems stand out I think. These are the one's where total commitment is allowed within the context of the rules,,, boxing is most definately one of these. You would have a true "feel" of how fast, and strong, bendy, sly, a human can be when they are truly going for it.. Nasty stuff.

Aero_Shodanjo
04-04-2006, 07:59 AM
Marital Artist? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Oh, martial artist... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Used to be Jiu-Jitsu long time ago. When I was going for the brown belt test, I got ill - and the doctor forbade any form of heavy physical activities ever since. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

CMHQ_Rikimaru
04-04-2006, 08:02 AM
It depends how u are looking at this. If u think that martial arts are only for body, u can call box a martial art. But for me martial arts have to be external and internal, so i wont count kick boxing, boxing, and some others. But remember, this is my humble opinion, and please dont discuss and dont destroy this topic.

P.S. Nealn - if u are close to 50, i would recommend taijiquan for youhttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

XyZspineZyX
04-04-2006, 08:49 AM
Originally posted by CMHQ_Rikimaru:
It depends how u are looking at this. If u think that martial arts are only for body, u can call box a martial art. But for me martial arts have to be external and internal, so i wont count kick boxing, boxing, and some others. But remember, this is my humble opinion, and please dont discuss and dont destroy this topic.

P.S. Nealn - if u are close to 50, i would recommend taijiquan for youhttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

You have an interesting point of view. I gather you study internal styles. I know very little of internal styles & systems. I have studies Yang Style Tai Chi under a Chinese grand master Old man Fu, but I did not train for long with him. I have "felt the chi" when doing the first form. I believe any system/style has external & internal benifits, some concentrate on the hard external energy & others concentrate on the soft internal energies. But they both have the flow on benifit of external to internal & visa/ versa. The hardest strikes I have thrown is when I am completely relaxed, strike right through the target & the body coordination "lines up". I dont feel the impact of the stike, basically the impact energy goes through the target.

A kung fu man once said to me "A good big guy will always beat a good little guy, but then there`s chi" I believe this completely.

XyZspineZyX
04-04-2006, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by Lucius_Esox:
Someone posted is boxing a martial art,,, h*ell yes http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I suppose it's semantics really but what does martial art mean. I suppose literally translated "war art"

I think war arts that don't do "full real" lol are not as effective in the real world imho.

A good indicator to see how effective your chosen art is would be to pick a brawl at your local bar Friday/Saturday night http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Kata's look wonderfull and I always admired the skill and dedication it took to perform them. But how effective would they be when you have got a 23year old 190pound ar*hole charging at you with intent to tear you a new one,,, hehe..

I know the first rule of martial arts is to make sure you fight to your own advantages so maybe you wouldn't do the above, (sic) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif. But these things do happen,, then certain systems stand out I think. These are the one's where total commitment is allowed within the context of the rules,,, boxing is most definately one of these. You would have a true "feel" of how fast, and strong, bendy, sly, a human can be when they are truly going for it.. Nasty stuff.

I have to disagree with you on "if you want to see how effective your system is go pick a brawl at your local pub/bar"
This is a good way of getting yourself a criminal record & thrown in jail (you will really learn how to fight then)

Or you will get yourself killed. Dont ever abuse your knowledge, "what goes around comes around" I am a firm believer of karma

If you wish to test your system/style do it in the ring, under set rules with a referee. Make sure you physically & mentally prepare for this well It will be one if not the hardest mental & physical challenge you will ever do & you will find your hardest opponent is YOURSELF.

Its my belief that kata/poomsee/forms are for technical development, unless you are studying an internal martial art, their forms are for chi development. What is it they say go slower & lower

CMHQ_Rikimaru
04-04-2006, 09:17 AM
dasriech - yes, i train taijiquan Yang style, just like you did, but i dont have any master, so my knowledge and skills arent great:P U have right, when u mean chinese martial arts, there are internal, and external, but their goal is the same. In western martial arts there is only external side, chinese often call them barbarian arts.
P.S. U are lucky, that u could be trained by good teacherhttp://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

XyZspineZyX
04-04-2006, 09:52 AM
I wished I had stuck with it, at the time I was going through a life crisis so I left, but I was given a small insight into an amasing internal art.

No doubt I will return to taichi, when I decide that what I do now is to hard on my body.

jetsetsam
04-04-2006, 10:37 AM
I practised Judo off and on from 12 up to 32. I wasn't really into Kata. I just loved the controlled violence. I had a brown belt and was just a few competition points short of my first Dan Black belt.

I had the opportunity to work out with 5th Dans fresh over from Japan, instructors for the Hong Kong, Tokyo and London police forces, and the RCMP, Hungarian wrestling champs and even one really good guy who trained Soviet secret police types. And my sensei was a chinese guy with 3rd Dans in Judo and Karate who used to make a living being a bouncer in white biker bars in South Africa. So I was was quite good and really enjoyed the excitement of streetfighting.

I was recovering from some broken ribs (you know when you're face down in a mud puddle having cold steel boots put to you?) when I was asked to represent my university in the provincial winter games. Then my thesis advisor called and told me that I would be kicked out of the Masters program if I didn't get my thesis done in 4 months time. 6 months later when I tried to get back into Judo I found that I had lost my edge and didn't appreciate being punched in the mouth, kicked in the knees and groin and smashed to the ground repeatedly. Funny how it took 20 years to reach that level of self-awareness.

Now I stick to cycling and watching ultimate fighting on TV. Nothing better than having a few beers and watching two strong fit men in speedos beat the **** out of each other.

I'm afraid I'll always be a goon.

Lucius_Esox
04-04-2006, 12:22 PM
dasreich,,,

it was not my intention to advocate going out and picking a fight with the nearest idiot. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

My intention was to raise the point how effective various martial arts are in defending yourself.

I really do appreciate the character building qualities of "internal" martial arts training.

I also know that the most effective form of self defence is awareness of dangerous situations in the first place.

But it is very possible that a situation can arise where you have to use force,,,,, in self defence.

My organisation when I was a Judo player was the BJA, as opposed to the BJC, we were regarded as Neanderthals by the BJC Judoka.

They could do wonderful break falls, beautiful Kata's, and knew the ways of Ki,,, or professed to. The BJA on the other hand is the organisation that send players to the Olympics.

The training methods were very different. BJA training was virtual brawling, very ugly to watch beginners. BJC was more refined and about learning technique from the very outset.

The difference, imo, was that by brawling you learn what is EFFECTIVE. Amazingly a player once he comes out of this brawling stage (obviously having been taught technique as and when needed) ended up having much more effective, and better to look at techniques.

He would also have true inner confidence and peace because he really DID know his own level vis a vis other people.

I worry about the idea that you can learn to be an effective fighter, without ever actually fighting properly. It could imbue a false sense of confidence, which, quite frankly, could be dangerous http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I have fought both young and old Olympic medalists.

Sorry to be so confrontational btw

KIMURA
04-04-2006, 12:45 PM
Originally posted by Lucius_Esox:
Someone posted is boxing a martial art,,, h*ell yes http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I suppose it's semantics really but what does martial art mean. I suppose literally translated "war art"

I think war arts that don't do "full real" lol are not as effective in the real world imho.

A good indicator to see how effective your chosen art is would be to pick a brawl at your local bar Friday/Saturday night http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Kata's look wonderfull and I always admired the skill and dedication it took to perform them. But how effective would they be when you have got a 23year old 190pound ar*hole charging at you with intent to tear you a new one,,, hehe..

I know the first rule of martial arts is to make sure you fight to your own advantages so maybe you wouldn't do the above, (sic) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif. But these things do happen,, then certain systems stand out I think. These are the one's where total commitment is allowed within the context of the rules,,, boxing is most definately one of these. You would have a true "feel" of how fast, and strong, bendy, sly, a human can be when they are truly going for it.. Nasty stuff.

No agreed with that.
The main thing U can learn doing martial arts is to learn how dangerous a specific situation is or how dangerous will it become and react accondingly --> move to the other side of the street or something like that. How effectiv a style is in reality does NOT depend on the style of martial art itself but more on the person who use it. There is NO ineffective or bad martial art system. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

BTW boxing is surely good but a boxer only knows how to use his arms and hit the upper body and head of his cantrahent while leaving his own sensitive parts unprotected.

Gitano1979
04-04-2006, 03:05 PM
Brown Belt of Shaolin Kung Fu style... then i left for breakdancing... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

_1SMV_Gitano

XyZspineZyX
04-04-2006, 07:11 PM
Originally posted by Lucius_Esox:
dasreich,,,

it was not my intention to advocate going out and picking a fight with the nearest idiot. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

My intention was to raise the point how effective various martial arts are in defending yourself.

I really do appreciate the character building qualities of "internal" martial arts training.

I also know that the most effective form of self defence is awareness of dangerous situations in the first place.

But it is very possible that a situation can arise where you have to use force,,,,, in self defence.

My organisation when I was a Judo player was the BJA, as opposed to the BJC, we were regarded as Neanderthals by the BJC Judoka.

They could do wonderful break falls, beautiful Kata's, and knew the ways of Ki,,, or professed to. The BJA on the other hand is the organisation that send players to the Olympics.

The training methods were very different. BJA training was virtual brawling, very ugly to watch beginners. BJC was more refined and about learning technique from the very outset.

The difference, imo, was that by brawling you learn what is EFFECTIVE. Amazingly a player once he comes out of this brawling stage (obviously having been taught technique as and when needed) ended up having much more effective, and better to look at techniques.

He would also have true inner confidence and peace because he really DID know his own level vis a vis other people.

I worry about the idea that you can learn to be an effective fighter, without ever actually fighting properly. It could imbue a false sense of confidence, which, quite frankly, could be dangerous http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I have fought both young and old Olympic medalists.

Sorry to be so confrontational btw

Lucius_Esox

No worries mate http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I do understand your point of view completely. Thanks for clearing up what you said, the reason I countered what you said about picking a street fight is because there is no doubt some young impressionable people out there who take notice of what is said & read. If they take or understand it the wrong way then they are likely to go out & do it.

The frightening thing is there is an element in the martial arts community that advocate this. That sort of attitude is PATHETIC & it gives the Martial way a bad name & reputation.

"I worry about the idea that you can learn to be an effective fighter, without ever actually fighting properly. It could imbue a false sense of confidence, which, quite frankly, could be dangerous"

I agree completely with the above statement, for technique to be effective it must be battlefield tested, the street is littered with the bodies of martial artists who got into a situation & they were out of there depth. I am a firm believer in reality training with alot of contact & an large amount of physical & mental conditioning. This is why I currently feel that Thaiboxing & any form of grappling is what suits me the best. I feel that MMA is another evolotionary step in the development of unarmed martial arts & I gear my personal training toward this. I think the Pride fighting championships, UFC & K1 are brilliant.

Ishmael932
04-04-2006, 07:57 PM
Studied Ken & Iaido with Takahashi sensei in redwood city for a few years, dabbled in Aikido concurrently. After working with ordnance, I was working my way to non-violence. I finally realized the truth to the Zen saying,

"The sword of the true Samurai lies, rusting, in it's scabbard."

Copperhead310th
04-04-2006, 10:18 PM
shotokan

Well lets see.

Since about age 10 (34 NOW)

I've spent at least 8 mothns or more in one form or another.
I started with the Korean styles:
Tang Soo Do, TKD- (Buda Kwan & Choda Kwan),
& then Kuk Sool Won. Never making 1st Dan in any of them.
Then picked up Shotokan for a while (mainely to gain better ground fighting skills & some def. moves vs the higher kicking/jumping of the Korean styles i was used to.
Then i meet Soke Yuki Koda,http://www.yoshukai.com/yuki3.jpg
through his son David, who is about the same age as me & started hanging around his Dojo a good bit learning Yoshukai. God Makes few
men in this world worth rembering. He was one of them. His passing & his memory will be with me always. As Martial Arts go....He was & always will be my hero. My personal Babe Ruth of Karate.http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Any man that can bend 7 ALUMINUM baseball bats with HIS SHIN is worth idolizing. And this is the only man on earth i would have let remove a playing card card from my teeth at HIGH SPEED with nunchaku. lol
A moment i'll NEVER forget. He says: Here joo put playing card between teeth like this. (Heavy Japanese accent) Wait, Wait..i have something in my eye. lol not funny at the time.
You can read more on Sensei Koda HERE. (http://www.yoshukai.com/)

the other dabblings into Japanese/Okinawan
forms i dabbled in i'll skip. there are quite a few. Basically i skiped around from this & that till i finnaly found happines. lol

i started in Wing Chun about four & a half years ago and made it up to my 3rd Black Under See Fu Jack Roberts. Who has been a VERY understanding teacher. I had a mishap on the job last year and had to have ACL reconstruction on my right knee & the left was hurt in tournemnt fighting looong ago. So i've been out of training and getting fatter since. lol I'll most likely remain with Wing Chun for the remainder of my life. Even though i'm already 1/2 way to mastering the entire form.
wich take only about six years with regular training and an adept student. And at some point
when i gte off my lazy butt...get my self back in shap to go down & train with my See Gung, Grandmaster Steave Lee Swift in Tampa.
And believe me...there's not too many more ppl on the planet that has an understanding of Wing Chun Kung Fu like this man. (http://www.swiftwingchun.org/index.html)

Copperhead310th
04-04-2006, 10:40 PM
Originally posted by KIMURA:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Lucius_Esox:
Someone posted is boxing a martial art,,, h*ell yes http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I suppose it's semantics really but what does martial art mean. I suppose literally translated "war art"

I think war arts that don't do "full real" lol are not as effective in the real world imho.

A good indicator to see how effective your chosen art is would be to pick a brawl at your local bar Friday/Saturday night http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Kata's look wonderfull and I always admired the skill and dedication it took to perform them. But how effective would they be when you have got a 23year old 190pound ar*hole charging at you with intent to tear you a new one,,, hehe..

I know the first rule of martial arts is to make sure you fight to your own advantages so maybe you wouldn't do the above, (sic) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif. But these things do happen,, then certain systems stand out I think. These are the one's where total commitment is allowed within the context of the rules,,, boxing is most definately one of these. You would have a true "feel" of how fast, and strong, bendy, sly, a human can be when they are truly going for it.. Nasty stuff.

No agreed with that.
The main thing U can learn doing martial arts is to learn how dangerous a specific situation is or how dangerous will it become and react accondingly --> move to the other side of the street or something like that. How effectiv a style is in reality does NOT depend on the style of martial art itself but more on the person who use it. There is NO ineffective or bad martial art system. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

BTW boxing is surely good but a boxer only knows how to use his arms and hit the upper body and head of his cantrahent while leaving his own sensitive parts unprotected. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well Said. Every teacher. and i mean almost every single one, (there's been a buch too)
would make you pay dearly for beign actually STUPID enough to pick a Fight. I watched one of my teachers ( Alex Butler-my 1st Teacher in Tang Soo Do) disapline a guy very badly one sat. morning after he found out that the black eye he wore to class that morning was earned from a drunken brawl he started the night before at a local bowling alley. After Mr. Butler was finnsihed with him....he quit.
Always Remember, as a Martial Artist, Starting a fight is never acceptible. But Finishing one is not only acceptible but highly encouraged. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/784.gif

Lucius_Esox
04-05-2006, 02:44 AM
dasreich http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Yes for sure m8. I can see by a couple of other posts that I didn't make my self clear either... Picking fights on the street=dumb and bad, deserve what will come your way eventually if your into that http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

Combination of striking and grappling skills must be very good, every angle, range covered. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Copperhead, Anterior cruciate ligament injury,,, ouch! Same injury put paid to my career as well. I did it playing blo*dy football as well http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif One of the saddest days in my life to date when that happened.

I do worry that martial artist get a bad name because of the deeds/perceptions of some. To actually step on the path and follow it far enough to feel the benifits is something,,, well,, you have to do it folks.

Believe me the confidence it gives you effects every area in your life imo,,,

You even get more chicks!!! lol

SeaFireLIV
04-05-2006, 03:07 AM
Originally posted by Lucius_Esox:
dasreich http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Believe me the confidence it gives you effects every area in your life imo,,,

You even get more chicks!!! lol

Now i`m glad I started Karate! LOL! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Good read, guys.

AKA_TAGERT
04-05-2006, 08:43 PM
Originally posted by Capt.LoneRanger:
That's what most people think of people playing PC-games, too. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif True.. but I dont walk around in public holding a joystick and saying "vroom vroom", thus only way they will know if I sim is if I tell them..

Where as if your dressed up like a klingon at a start trek convention.. someone is bound to see you getting in and out of the car before you make it inside the building.. At which point, folks are going to say NERD.

Or if you walk up to someone, bend at the knees and yelling "Hieee Yaaaaah" and than thrust your hands up in front of yourself like a mine holding an invisable picture frame.. At which point, folks are going to say NERD.

That reminds me, a kid tried that on me once back when I was in the army, I grab him by the wrist and spun him around and pushed his face into the wall.. "Hieee Yaaaah" this I said.. Good times.

XyZspineZyX
04-06-2006, 12:54 AM
Originally posted by AKA_TAGERT:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Capt.LoneRanger:
That's what most people think of people playing PC-games, too. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif True.. but I dont walk around in public holding a joystick and saying "vroom vroom", thus only way they will know if I sim is if I tell them..

Where as if your dressed up like a klingon at a start trek convention.. someone is bound to see you getting in and out of the car before you make it inside the building.. At which point, folks are going to say NERD.

Or if you walk up to someone, bend at the knees and yelling "Hieee Yaaaaah" and than thrust your hands up in front of yourself like a mine holding an invisable picture frame.. At which point, folks are going to say NERD.

That reminds me, a kid tried that on me once back when I was in the army, I grab him by the wrist and spun him around and pushed his face into the wall.. "Hieee Yaaaah" this I said.. Good times. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The world is a big place mate & if you are in the slightest bit concerned by what other people think, then you have a problem.

Nerd is just a word & its effect is how you take it.

El Turo
04-06-2006, 01:50 AM
I trained in Tang Soo Do for a few years, but it's been a while. I've been thinking of getting active again in training, but in a different discipline like Kung Fu, perhaps.

Mysticpuma2003
04-06-2006, 02:40 AM
Blackbelt in Ju-Jitsu (traditional and Gracie), was British Champion about 6 years ago, work unfortunately has got in the way of training, but you never forget the skills.

JG4_Helofly
04-06-2006, 04:47 AM
I am swiss champion in Judo in + 90 KG http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

XyZspineZyX
04-06-2006, 06:09 AM
Originally posted by Mysticpuma2003:
Blackbelt in Ju-Jitsu (traditional and Gracie), was British Champion about 6 years ago, work unfortunately has got in the way of training, but you never forget the skills.

Ahhh Gracie Ju-Jitsu, At the gym I train at we have people who train in Gracie Ju-Jitsu, they are graded by Marcello Renzende (I think thats how its spelt) He has a full time school in Sydney. He comes over here & teaches seminars & grades those who are of standard. My Friend teaches at the gym, he has graded to blue belt, he was the driving force in bringing Gracie Ju-Jitsu to the South West of Western Australia. He also has trained in Bushi-Kempo Ju-Jitsu, so he has an extensive grappling background. Its a very effective martial art, it rocked the martial art world when Royce Gracie cleaned the house in UFC 1,2 & 4.

XyZspineZyX
04-06-2006, 06:12 AM
Originally posted by JG4_Helofly:
I am swiss champion in Judo in + 90 KG http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

If you dont mind me asking, how many times a week do you train to get to your champion level? I would assume you eat, sleep & breath Judo.

AKA_TAGERT
04-06-2006, 09:00 AM
Originally posted by dasriech:
The world is a big place mate & if you are in the slightest bit concerned by what other people think, then you have a problem.

Nerd is just a word & its effect is how you take it. Agreed 100%! Glad to hear your comfortable speaking Klingon in public.

XyZspineZyX
04-06-2006, 07:17 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

fabianfred
04-07-2006, 12:52 AM
I trained in Shotokan Karate for about 3 years and got to puple belt (A.K.A.)
I liked the Kata best of all and felt that it would be a long time before I was ready to do free fighting. I was very much into the traditional ways so I wanted to spend a long time doing one-step and three-step fighting before trying any free-style stuff.
I considered most schools and teachers were trying to hurry their students into 'competition', without any real grounding.
Westerners are so damn impatient when it comes to esoteric/oriental/eastern traditions, whether it is martial arts/meditation/tai chi/yoga or whatever.
They want to be Black-belt in three years instead of the twenty or more that are really necessary.
I suppose it was the good exercise and discipline which I enjoyed most, and the fact I was doing an asian art, since I've always been attracted to Asian things.
Now I just do Vipassana meditation, but I'd like to add some yoga and Tai chi which can also be methods of meditation too.
Of Course, I don't mean to hit on westerners only... some asians have tried to develop shortcuts by starting systems such as power yoga or power Tai-chi or similar, doing things quickly which were meant to be done slowly, and are actually harder when done slow...