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antiStalin
06-09-2008, 02:19 PM
Dear Sir / Madam,

I have installed IL2 1946 both on my desk and notebook computers. I like to switch to autopilot to learn how to fly various plane. However, when I turn back to manual control, I discover: If I do not touch the keyboard or joystick, the plane altitude and direction will continue to vibrate, the plane nose often turn right and down. As you can predict, it crashes at last. I wondered whether this is due to the difficulty setting or not. Therefore, I turn the setting to easy, that is no torque effect, etc. However, the situation repeats itself. It happens in both computers. My computers are up-to-date and my joystick is Logitech Extreme 3D Pro. What I mean is, I can't get the performance of autopilot, that is to say stable direction and altitude even my difficulty setting is easy. What's wrong?

Thanks in advance for your reply.

With best wishes,
antiStalin

Monterey13
06-09-2008, 02:27 PM
You need to trim your control surfaces. Look in the controls menu and look for the default keys(or set up your own) for...

Rudder trim
Aileron trim
Elevator trim

You will need to make trim adjustments during flight to keep your plane flying straight and level with no joystick input from you.

antiStalin
06-09-2008, 03:24 PM
Dear Monterey13,

Many thanks for your reply. I will try later.

All the best,
antiStalin

"Say one inappropriate word and others will reject you. Speech should be just right. Do not speak too much or too little." Master Cheng Yen

mortoma
06-09-2008, 05:14 PM
Whatever you do, don't try to mimic the way the AI approach to land!! Many newbies through the years try it like they do it and get frustrated. The AI approach to land way, way, way too shallow. Come in at a steeper angle than they do. You can come in with a lot lower pwoer setting so the torque effects are lessened.

The AI have an extremely shallow approach glideslope of only about 2 degrees and if you do it that way you have to maintain 40% or more thottle to stay in the air. This is unrealistic, most warbirds should be flown in about 5 degrees glideslope. Most pilots of the time came in more steeply than one would in a normal general aviation aircraft.

antiStalin
06-10-2008, 12:35 AM
Dear mortoma,

Thank you for your precious advice.

All the best,
antiStalin

"The basic work of moral cultivation is to have patience and to give." Master Cheng Yen

Klemm.co
06-10-2008, 04:16 AM
Use the rudder (trim) to keep the ball (slip indicator) in the middle, and elevator trim to keept the plane on course.
I only use the elevator for greater manouvers or combat.
Trim is the key to stable flight. Of course some airplanes in the sim don't have trim for all control surfaces, and some haven't got it at all, like the I-16 and I-153.

And when landing, the AI isn't really flying, it's just following a prescripted path, easily seen by the fact that it does (nearly) the same landing with all aircraft.

antiStalin
06-10-2008, 12:21 PM
To Klemm.co

Grateful for your valuable comments.

"To forgive others one more time is to create one more blessing. The more one forgives, the more blessings one creates." Master Cheng Yen

mortoma
06-10-2008, 12:56 PM
Originally posted by Klemm.co:
Use the rudder (trim) to keep the ball (slip indicator) in the middle, and elevator trim to keept the plane on course.
I only use the elevator for greater manouvers or combat.
Trim is the key to stable flight. Of course some airplanes in the sim don't have trim for all control surfaces, and some haven't got it at all, like the I-16 and I-153.

And when landing, the AI isn't really flying, it's just following a prescripted path, easily seen by the fact that it does (nearly) the same landing with all aircraft. You are correct, the AI are literally on 'rails' when they land. But that doesn't mean new people will not try to emulate their way of landing. This is why I warn newcomers to the game about this.

M_Gunz
06-11-2008, 06:57 AM
When you switch AI on it has it's own controls and when you switch off the controls go back
to whatever way yours are placed.

Coming in to land, open the radiators as well as flaps and gear down. Run the prop as fast
as it will go but at very low power, 25% and less which will not let the plane go too fast.

During approach use your nose pitch to control your speed and your power to control your
height and do not let your speed get below 25% more than stall until the last bit.

You can sideslip to slow down or lose height without speeding up. Rudder one way and bank
the other to sideslip.

When you have good speed control it gets a lot easier to land. I like to come in on a curve
just because it is easier to see where I'm going, especially to grass strips that blend in
so well. But that takes practice to come out right.

antiStalin
06-12-2008, 06:55 AM
To M_Gunz:

Grateful for your in-depth sharing!

"Struggle to free yourself from your love and desire for material objects. With few desires and no greed, you will naturally feel free and easy and will lack of nothing." Master Cheng Yen

strider1
06-12-2008, 07:41 AM
Just to say it in a different way, use your throttle and trim as advised above to get your airplane stable (flying straight and level without other input from stick or rudder---hands-off) before you engage the autopilot.

As long as your craft is in a straight and level attitude and approximately the same speed when you disengage your autopilot, your craft will already be stable or close to it and not veer off. If you turn it off while in a climb, descent, turn or different speed, the trim you set prior will be inappropriate as the flight forces, including torque, will be different.

You'll soon find that using trim, especially elevator, is used so often that it will become second nature; just relieve the pressure on the stick so you don't have to apply much, if any, force to maintain the desired attitude, If your hand or wrist are getting tired, you're not using trim enough.

Although it seems confusing, stick controls airspeed, throttle controls altitude. It is applying both together that makes it seem the other way around, Play around with it when trimmed for straight and level and you'll see it clearly.

Hope that helps.

Strider1

Krt_Bong
06-12-2008, 08:07 AM
Everything posted above is good advice, I have actually flown this sim using a Logitech 3D and I can tell you that that particular stick has some inherent problems with centering; you should go to their website and get the Clear Calibration Utility.
Go into Controls on your PC and make sure that your stick centers when hands off (I used to thump it a couple times just to make sure) If your stick wont center and you can't calibrate it you'll make yourself work too hard to overcome it with trim. Hope that helps you, I went through three of those and had 2 models previous to that they all eventually wanted to turn left after a while. I have an X-45 and pedals now http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

antiStalin
06-14-2008, 12:53 AM
To: strider1 & Krt_Bong,

Extremely grateful for your valuable comments.

"Morality is reason. If desire continues to increase, it will bury reason. If reason can be enhanced, then it can end desire." Master Cheng Yen

antiStalin
08-22-2008, 12:28 PM
Dear All,

Considering a moderator's perspective, I'm going to change my name to "Juutilainen". I apologize for any inconvenience that this may have caused.

"As soon as one forgives oneself, one begins to get lazy. Be alert at every moment." Master Cheng Yen

DD_crash
08-23-2008, 10:08 AM
You could always change it to auntie Stalin http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Uufflakke
08-23-2008, 05:06 PM
Or what to think of: Ain't I Stalling?

Stingray333
08-23-2008, 10:57 PM
Originally posted by antiStalin:
If I do not touch the keyboard or joystick, the plane altitude and direction will continue to vibrate, the plane nose often turn right and down. As you can predict, it crashes at last. I wondered whether this is due to the difficulty setting or not. Therefore, I turn the setting to easy, that is no torque effect, etc. What's wrong?


I suspect what is happening, is that the plane is initially trimmed slightly nose down and so the nose starts to drop. As the nose starts to drop, the speed goes up of course, as the speed goes up the amount of lift generated by the wings increases and the nose will begin to go up and the plane will eventually climb. As the plane climbs, the speed goes down and the lift generated by the wings decreases and the whole process repeats itself!

I once thought I was on autopilot and went to get a drink for a minute while the autopilot flew to the target area. I came back and took over the controls and to my surprise, the plane had been flying without auto pilot for about 3 minutes without crashing! But it did this exact behavior of the nose going down and then going up, quite interesting, but I think it simply has to do with the changing lift with changing speed http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

As a side note, beginners to this game often have the idea that if you do not touch a planes controls that it will continue flying perfectly straight until it runs out of fuel. This is simply not how aerodynamics works. In order to fly the plane straight and level there is quite a bit of input required such that all the various forces on the aircraft are balanced.

Rather than having the pilot have to constantly apply this input through the controls, pilots have the option of "trimming" the plane, that is, they can adjust the flight surfaces such that the result is the plane will fly straight. It is important to note that the trim setting required for the plane to fly perfectly straight will change with airspeed, attitude and elevation! Its a constantly changing ballet.

Stingray

Juutilainen1939
08-24-2008, 11:45 AM
"A happy life does not lie in money, power, fame and status. It is based on the love and care between people." Master Cheng Yen

Stingray333
08-24-2008, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by Uufflakke:
Or what to think of: Ain't I Stalling?

ha!