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View Full Version : Couple of BoB questions if I may?



Arm_slinger
07-17-2005, 05:09 AM
Hello all

I've just come back in from walking out in the sun with a couple of questions relating to BoB

If we get pilotable bombers with both pilot and co-pilot positions, in a coop mode at least, will we be able to have two pilots controling the aircraft? I.e. one pilot flies the aircraft, while the other keeps a check on the instruments, general function of the aircraft, looking for the enemy etc

It would bring about a whole new level of team work and trust in my opinion. But then there is the risk of getting peope occupie one of the seats and muck around.... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif. Maybe an option could be included to turn co-pilots off?


Also (and i'm not too sure if this is true or not) could the RAF fighters have staggered gun convergences (if they ever did this) to get the shot gun effect?

Man the load out screens are going to be sweet if we can set multiple convergences, ammunition types and such like http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Thanks and all the best folks http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Taylortony
07-17-2005, 06:26 AM
Doubt you will get any variation on convergencies, these were set on the ground by raising the tail onto a stand and firing the guns into Butts, they were then manually set by adjusting the mountings to harmonise them

OD_79
07-17-2005, 06:40 AM
The options with two flyable seat are great...just think of having a Tiger Moth for an OTU for squadrons, or a BF108 for the Germans. You could give proper training to people. It was something that I had hoped could be done for CFS3 once some of the trainers had been made, but apparently it was not possible.

OD.

Arm_slinger
07-17-2005, 06:49 AM
It would make handling a wounded bomber alot more interesting as well http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. I gets rather tricky at times now lol



Ooooh!!! and clickable cockpit like B17 mighty eighth would be excellent!! I loved that feature. Combine that with track IR and WOW!!! what an experience! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

horseback
07-17-2005, 03:00 PM
Originally posted by Taylortony:
Doubt you will get any variation on convergencies, these were set on the ground by raising the tail onto a stand and firing the guns into Butts, they were then manually set by adjusting the mountings to harmonise them

Different squadrons had their 'herks' set up their guns in different ways as combat experience built up. I believe that the RAF 'standard' at the Battle's outset was something like 400 yards, and this was soon found to be unpractical for all but the most gifted marksmen. It must have been changed at the Squadron level.

In the frantic activity that characterized the Battle of Britain, this may not have been probable or even possible with 11 Group units, but 12 Group enjoyed a bit more leisure, and may have exercised some latitude.

Malan and others were recommending getting in very close, not least because the .303 guns lost a great deal of hitting power the farther away you were from your target, and obviously, it was much harder to hit even a bomber from a quarter mile away. I believe that convergence ranges for most Spitfires and Hurricane squadrons were set to 150 to 200 yds very quickly. I'd be curious to see if the convergences were set up for replacement aircraft at the factory or some depot before delivery to the squadrons.

In the USAAF, a pilot could have his crew chief set the guns' convergences up to his preferences, and a/c with 6 or more MGs could have the last pair turned off until the others ran out by not turning their firing switches/solenoids on, to extend firing time. The "shotgun" method of setting up each pair of guns for a wide range of convergences is supposed to have originated with US Navy fighter squadrons after Midway, to counter the Japanese' ability to turn on a dime (or sixpence).

cheers

horseback