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general_kalle
02-06-2008, 11:38 AM
just reading a book about Adolf Gallands Carear.

it's called

Fortunes of War.

The First and The Last
germany's fighter force in the second world war
Adolf Galland

anybody read it?
what do you think of it

until new it seams pretty good though im hoping on some neat dogfight tricks or something.

interesting read though.

stalkervision
02-06-2008, 12:33 PM
Great book! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif Little dogfighting mentioned.. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

ultraHun
02-06-2008, 02:17 PM
It's his autobiography? I would take anything with a grain of salt.

It is the first one of several autobiographies of German generals that appeared shortly after the war. Those tried to convince the reader that the German defeat was not their authors fault, but due to numbers, Hitler, bad luck, bad fate etc. ... It is as well the origin of the "Me-262 could have prolonged or even turned the war" claim. It is a defense of the German fighter pilots who were frowned upon by civilians and common soldiers alike immediately after the war for receiving publc adoration, highest distinctions, etc. until mid-war and then faling in denying allied air-rule.

The German edition at least reveals how admiring he was of Hitler until the war turned sour ... in addition there are several paragraphs that show that he did not obtain some critical distance to the regime after the war (although he was not a core Nazi either). I believe this book might even be the reason why Kammhuber was preferred to Galland as first air-force chief of the federal republic ....

leitmotiv
02-06-2008, 02:27 PM
Ancient. There are biographies which were published around the time of his death which might be of greater interest.

Schwarz.13
02-06-2008, 04:26 PM
This topic has got me wondering about Priller.

For such a high-profile/high-scoring western-front ace and one of the Jagdwaffe's most flamboyant characters, he seems to have been a remarkable non-entity, post-war.

To my knowledge he doesn't seem to have written anything or been interviewed despite being immortalized by Cornelius Ryan 2 years before his death.

His entire post-war life seems to have been pathetically summarized at Wikipedia in just one sentence:

"Post-war "Pips"¯ Priller managed a brewery business, and he died suddenly in 1961 from a heart attack in Böbing, Upper Bavaria)"

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

leitmotiv
02-06-2008, 04:44 PM
He married a beer heiress, lived the good life, died too early.

Rjel
02-06-2008, 05:52 PM
Originally posted by Schwarz.13:
"Post-war "Pips"¯ Priller managed a brewery business, and he died suddenly in 1961 from a heart attack in Böbing, Upper Bavaria)"
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif

The man lived out his life like 99.9% of the rest of us do. Had a career, I suppose a family too. Can't ask for much more. Sad that he died at such an early age.

horseback
02-07-2008, 12:57 AM
C'mon, man! Pips was living the dream, you know, the one where you marry a hot rich chick who owns a brewery. He didn't need to cash in on his war reputation; he just moved on, and I say good for him!

cheers

horseback

Schwarz.13
02-07-2008, 01:52 AM
Originally posted by horseback:
Pips was living the dream, you know, the one where you marry a hot rich chick who owns a brewery. He didn't need to cash in on his war reputation; he just moved on, and I say good for him!

Good point Horseback!

Here's to less ego and living the good life:

http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:mrvjpYuPJFzXzM:http://www.germansteins.com/images/bk047pl.jpg

S! and zum Wohl!

trumper
02-07-2008, 04:00 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gifAdolph Gallands book is good but not very inspiring.It is is full of figures,numbers,tonnages etc but not really any personal what it was really like type stories.
I found it interesting but too clinical.I want to know what flying those planes feels like,sounds like etc,not tables.

JtD
02-07-2008, 04:15 AM
For me it was interesting to read about a fighter pilots perspective, but not much more.

general_kalle
03-05-2008, 07:25 AM
about taking it with a grain of salt.
its not glamourising the luftwaffe
he's very critical about what was done, mainly towards the leaders though.

SweetMonkeyLuv
03-05-2008, 07:37 AM
One of the more interesting luftwaffe autobiographies I've read so far (although, admittedly, I haven't read many) was "Spitfire On My Tail" by Ulrich Steinhilper. Steinhilper paints a very bad picture of Galland, in particular, even in the early years (39/40). Steinhilper is saddled with communication duties for the squadron, and find that Kondor guys like Galland a barrier to improving tactical use of radio comms. He talks about how pissed it made him to read about Galland later saying how big a proponent he was of the use of radio in fighters.

GregGal
03-05-2008, 07:50 AM
Hmm...I read it: full of interesting facts, but there's barely a dogfight in it. In fact it was boring as hell to read.

csThor
03-05-2008, 08:35 AM
"The First and the Last" is essentially an attempt by Galland to polish his own gloriole and pretty much a justification for his role in the war. However he makes some claims that are essentially lies - especially regarding his relation towards the mass of the Reich Defense pilots. Galland was known for his tendency to seek everyone's attention and his sometimes petty vanity. He was one of those commanders who would seek personal victories and ignore his responsibilities for the men he had to lead in the air - a type of commander which was called "Abschiesser".

Galland managed to create a nimbus post-war with the mainly UK- and US-based authors through direct communications. This reputation, however, is in parts undeserved and in parts downright wrong.