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View Full Version : Today In WW II History - PART 2



blairgowrie
01-20-2010, 05:33 AM
Continued from PART 1 : http://forums.ubi.com/eve/foru...3110283/m/1771097952 (http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/1771097952)

DrHerb
01-20-2010, 07:35 AM
Ill kick it off...

1942 - 1942 The Wannsee Conference On this day, Nazi officials meet to discuss the details of the "Final Solution" of the "Jewish question." In July 1941, Herman Goering, writing under instructions from Hitler, had ordered Reinhard Heydrich, SS general and Heinrich Himmler's number-two man, to submit "as soon as possible a general plan of the administrative, material, and financial measures necessary for carrying out the desired final solution of the Jewish question." Heydrich met with Adolf Eichmann, chief of the Central Office of Jewish Emigration, and 15 other officials from various Nazi ministries and organizations at Wannsee, a suburb of Berlin. The agenda was simple and focused: to devise a plan that would render a "final solution to the Jewish question" in Europe. Various gruesome proposals were discussed, including mass sterilization and deportation to the island of Madagascar. Heydrich proposed simply transporting Jews from every corner Europe to concentration camps in Poland and working them to death. Objections to this plan included the belief that this was simply too time-consuming. What about the strong ones who took longer to die? What about the millions of Jews who were already in Poland? Although the word "extermination" was never uttered during the meeting, the implication was clear: anyone who survived the egregious conditions of a work camp would be "treated accordingly." Months later, the "gas vans" in Chelmno, Poland, which were killing 1,000 people a day, proved to be the "solution" they were looking for--the most efficient means of killing large groups of people at one time. The minutes of this conference were kept with meticulous care, which later provided key evidence during the Nuremberg war crimes trials.

1945 - Hungary signs armistice with Allies

AndyJWest
01-20-2010, 07:31 PM
RAF Raid on Magdeburg 21/22nd January 1944:
http://i633.photobucket.com/albums/uu53/LAF-Forum/Magdeburg21-22Jan44.jpg

More info here (http://www.lancaster-archive.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=1945&sid=d653e123ce8362e0572834d891351fc4).

Perhaps not a 'significant' event in the war, but part of a campaign that regardless how you view it, affected the lives of millions. The only fitting tribute to those on both sides who died, is to ensure it never happpens again.

woofiedog
01-23-2010, 06:42 AM
Today in WWII History...

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 499, JANUARY 23, 1944

North Pacific.

1. On the early morning of January 23 (East Longitude Date) two groups of Navy bombers bombed enemy installations on the south and west coasts of Paramushiru Island. Antiaircraft fire was encountered, but no enemy planes were met. All U. S. planes returned without damage.

Anzio 22 January-24 May 1944 (http://www.history.army.mil/brochures/anzio/72-19.htm)

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/USA-A-Anzio/img/USA-A-Anzio-61.jpg
Called "Anzio Annie" by Allied forces during the Italian Campaign of WW II. This railroad gun evolved from the large siege guns of WW I. It can accurately fire about 31 miles. A rail crew would curve the track to provide a wide angle of fire. Twenty-five of the K5 280 mm series were made. This gun was captured in Italy after it and a second gun ("Robert") had been firing on the Anzio beach head. The guns were hidden in mountain tunnels when not firing..

OKW, Kesselring, and Brig. Gen. Siegfried Westphal, Kesselring's chief of staff, were astonished that the Anzio forces had not exploited their unopposed landing with an immediate thrust into the virtually undefended Alban Hills on 23-24 January. As Westphal later recounted, there were no significant German units between Anzio and Rome, and he speculated that an imaginative, bold strike by enterprising forces could easily have penetrated into the interior or sped straight up Highways 6 and 7 to Rome. Instead, Westphal recalled, the enemy forces lost time and hesitated. As the Germans later discovered, General Lucas was neither bold nor imaginative, and he erred repeatedly on the side of caution, to the increasing chagrin of both Alexander and Clark.

U.S.S. Allen M. Sumner DD-692 Inclining Tests at Federal Shipbuilding & Drydock (http://www.dd-692.com/other2.htm)

SUPERMAN SUNDAY COMIC STRIPS PHOTO GALLERY (http://www.seans4sale.com/sm_sunday/Superman_Comic_Strips_Sunday_1944.htm)

bruce57
01-24-2010, 05:10 PM
this is not completely WWII related, but Winston Churchill died today in 1965 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

StephenSherman
05-14-2010, 09:23 AM
VMF(N)-533, a Marine night-fighting squadron (http://www.acepilots.com/usmc_sqns.html), flew to Yontan airfield, Okinawa on May 14, 1945.

Erkki_M
05-14-2010, 09:34 AM
14.5.1940.

Luftwaffe bombed Rotterdam, Netherlands surrendered to Germany.

StephenSherman
05-15-2010, 12:46 PM
The men of VMF-214 (http://www.acepilots.com/usmc_vmf214.html) began their inter-tour R&R (Rest and Recreation) on May 15, 1943: ten days "rest" at Espiritu Santo and then a week of, let's say, "recreation" in Australia.

Jumoschwanz
05-16-2010, 10:28 PM
A friend of mine was stationed out west in WWII for a bit. Some "agents" had him fly them and a Japanese guy out over the Pacific in a C-47.

After a fashion the agents pushed the Japanese guy out of the plane into the prop and he splattered all over the plane.

They found a storm to fly through to clean the plane off, then returned to base.

WWII history that didn't make it into the books....

AndyJWest
05-16-2010, 11:04 PM
Originally posted by Jumoschwanz:
A friend of mine was stationed out west in WWII for a bit. Some "agents" had him fly them and a Japanese guy out over the Pacific in a C-47.

After a fashion the agents pushed the Japanese guy out of the plane into the prop and he splattered all over the plane.

They found a storm to fly through to clean the plane off, then returned to base.

WWII history that didn't make it into the books....
Yeah, right. 'Agents' don't just bump some guy off, and bury him in the desert somewhere, but go to the trouble of involving outsiders in a ludicrous scheme to dispose of the body.

And exactly how can you push someone out of a C-47 so he hits the prop? Did they push him out of the co-pilots window? I'm not sure that even that would work.

Sorry, Jumoschwantz, this doesn't sound like 'history' to me....