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Plelv44_Mangrov
01-18-2007, 01:41 PM
Hello!

Mr. Väinö Pokela is telling about his military and civil career on next saturday (20th January) at Finnish Aviation Museum in Finland.

I'm pretty sure that there will be time to ask some questions after the occasion so post your questions here and I'll see what I can do!

To learn more about his career and see if your question is already answered, check the link.

Virtualpilots - Väinö Pokela - Brewster And Messerchmitt Pilot In Hostile Skies (http://www.virtualpilots.fi/hist/WW2History-PokelaEnglish.html)<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

"No enemy plane will fly over the reich territory"
Herman Göing

Heliopause
01-19-2007, 03:32 AM
Did he pick up his B-239 in Sweden?
if so any special memories?
His first impression whilst seing this plane.
Did he pick up his 109 in Germany?
Any special memories/first impression on seing the 109.

Did he make training flights first or did he perform operational missions right away on these planes?

Was he a wingman to anybody on most missions?
What was the general feeling about the enemy (e.g. they were not considerd better in the air?)

What was his longest flight in the B-239 and 109?
Any tough dog-fights he remembers?

How to approuch enemy bombers in B-239/109?

Where there any maintanance problems/problems with spare parts for both planes?

Ask if he as any pictures made during his time operating these planes....and but them on the forum http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b334/PauseHelio/fokker_now.jpg
"Once (I think it was 31st aug. 1940), I was in a fight with four Hurricanes over Dover.
I was back over the channel when I saw another Hurricane coming from Calais, trailing white smoke, obviously in a bad way.
I flew up alongside him and escorted him all the way to England and waved goodbye.
A few weeks later the same thing happened to me.
That would never have happened in Russia - never". (Erich Rudorffer - 109 pilot)

Heliopause
01-19-2007, 03:35 AM
camo colors...
Personal insigna on his plane?<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b334/PauseHelio/fokker_now.jpg
"Once (I think it was 31st aug. 1940), I was in a fight with four Hurricanes over Dover.
I was back over the channel when I saw another Hurricane coming from Calais, trailing white smoke, obviously in a bad way.
I flew up alongside him and escorted him all the way to England and waved goodbye.
A few weeks later the same thing happened to me.
That would never have happened in Russia - never". (Erich Rudorffer - 109 pilot)

Plelv44_Mangrov
01-19-2007, 06:59 AM
These are that kind of questions I can answer based on his interview.


Originally posted by Heliopause:
Did he pick up his B-239 in Sweden?
if so any special memories?


No. Pokela joined LeLv 30 on 31th August 1941 so he was still at training squadron during Winter War. He hasn't wrote any memoirs.


Originally posted by Heliopause:
Did he pick up his 109 in Germany?
Did he make training flights first or did he perform operational missions right away on these planes?


Yes. Pokela flew as a passenger on DC-2 / Ju-52 to Germany and came back with Bf-109. All Finnish fighter pilots had to flew at least few hours with Bf-109 before operational missions (even in 1944).


Originally posted by Heliopause:
Where there any maintanance problems/problems with spare parts for both planes? Ask if he as any pictures made during his time operating these planes....and but them on the forum http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Both Brewster and Bf-109 ("Mersu") had no bigger problems with spare parts. Although no parts were bought from USA to B-239 after 1940 Finns used own parts to replace the old ones (etc. machine guns, some engines, tyres).

The Germans had a depot at Pori. Ilmavoimat (Finnish Air Forces) got the spare parts from there, but sometimes the Germans though Finns are trying to hoard parts and gave only the minimal amound of parts needed to maintain the Bf-109.

There should be few photos in Kari Stenman's book "Aerial Victories part 2".

Kari Stenman Publishing (http://www.kolumbus.fi/kari.stenman/sih27.html)


Originally posted by Heliopause:
camo colors...
Personal insigna on his plane?


For B-239: The usual oliivinvihreä (olive green) and musta (black). Bf-109: splinter and mottled camouflage, some planes had oliivinvihreä + musta.

The offical order was not have personal insignia on the planes, however, some planes had names or characters. Pokela's aeroplanes didn't carry any special markings (only the register number and tactical number).<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

"No enemy plane will fly over the reich territory"
Herman Göing

BSS_AIJO
01-19-2007, 08:42 AM
ok,

I have to ask questions.

Before trimming out did the real buffalo feel like it was balancing on the head of a pin?

What were his gun convergences set at in the buffalo?

Which did he prefer to fly, the buffalo or the me109?

BSS_AIJO<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://www.sloganizer.net/en/style3,BSS-unl-AIJO.png (http://www.sloganizer.net/en/)

DIRTY-MAC
01-19-2007, 09:23 AM
ask about the performance and handling and limits of the planes he flew<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

Otto may have been a weirdo, but he was a dam good fighterpilot.
http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c15/HOOTCHIE-MAMA/ohhbabyfinal.jpg
aka HOOTCHIE MAMA online

slipBall
01-19-2007, 12:07 PM
Hello and thanks


1. The 109 in flight, what sounds could he hear if any

2. The 109, what level of vibration was there

3. The 109, was brakeing on landing stable. or did the aircraft want to nose down

4. The 109 on takeoff, how much rudder was needed...did he lock the tail wheel<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f394/SlipBall/orders.jpg

WWMaxGunz
01-19-2007, 01:17 PM
Ask if he ever ran the prop by manual pitch control.
Ask if he or others with him ever used flaps at all during combat.

Ask about dives. About throttle adjusting in or before dive and speeds.
Ask about how one plane seperates from the other in a dive to escape and if such a dive
would always be escape or what affects possibilities of escape.

We need better to understand about diving to escape or catch in different planes, how fast
is fast seperation kind of thigs. Is the great leap in being first to move and what it is
worth, if there is a closeness that cannot be overcome without great luck, that sort of
thing. Explain perhaps that much written is not clear in terms of today compared to then
or even pilot terms compared to car drivers for example. Where is the getaway or catch
made?

Plelv44_Mangrov
01-20-2007, 08:25 AM
Originally posted by slipBall:
1. The 109 in flight, what sounds could he hear if any

2. The 109, what level of vibration was there

3. The 109, was brakeing on landing stable. or did the aircraft want to nose down

4. The 109 on takeoff, how much rudder was needed...did he lock the tail wheel

Virtualpilots - 109 myths, facts and the view from the cockpit (http://www.virtualpilots.fi/feature/articles/109myths/)

1. Can you hear other sounds from the plane?

Kyösti Karhila being attacked by Soviet La-5:
"Do you hear the sound of passing enemy projectiles?
No, it is masked by the sound of your engine and the airflow, but I heard the tac-tac-tac of the enemy guns."
- Kyösti Karhila, Finnish fighter ace. 32 victories. Source: Interview by Finnish Virtual Pilots Association.

"-Can you hear the engine of another plane if you are flying next to it?
No, since your own engine is closer and its noise drowns that of the other one. But you can feel taking a hit, it is like "clack, clack". The holes then were the holes of the splinters of a heavy AAA shell."
- Kyösti Karhila, Finnish fighter ace. 32 victories. Source: Interview by Finnish Virtual Pilots Association.

2. One thing that was absolutely good about it, was the wild performance of the aircraft. Other good points were the visibility during the flight, the sitting position, the cockpit wasn't unnecessary roomy, the impression of controlled flight and sturdy construction: no vibrations or shakings, the electrically heated flightsuit and gloves.
- Torsti Tallgren, Finnish post war fighter pilot. Source: Hannu Valtonen, "Me 109 ja Saksan sotatalous" (Messerschmitt Bf 109 and the German war economy), ISBN 951-95688-7-5.

3. ...109 had very good brakes and the gear was so forward, that the was no worries about nosing over with full braking.

4. At my first takeoff (with a MT) it was about ten degrees that I veered to the left. I had planned to fly over the hangar no. 1 but ended up flying between the hangars no. 3 and 1. That much difference there was."
- Antti Tani, Finnish fighter ace. 21,5 victories. Source: Interview by Finnish Virtual Pilots Association.

In my opinion the Messerchmitt's tendendy to swing in takeoff was the result of incorrect training and pilot attitude. Perhaps too hasty takeoffs were sometimes responsible. If you pushed the throttle fully open immediately, the plane tried suddenly to turn right and lean towards the left wing, especially if you had not locked the tailwheel. If the pilot now strongly pushed the left rudder to correct the rightways swing, the plane now started a powerful swing leftwards towards the "Messerschmitt corner". The plane was now hard to control if you didn't use the right brake. But I think the accidents in takeoff were mostly because lack of knowledge and lack of piloting skills."
-Mikko Lallukka, Finnish fighter pilot. Source: Hannu Valtonen, "Me 109 ja Saksan sotatalous" (Messerschmitt Bf 109 and the German war economy), ISBN 951-95688-7-5.Source: Hannu Valtonen, "Messerschmitt Bf 109 and the German war economy"<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

"No enemy plane will fly over the reich territory"
Herman Göing

Plelv44_Mangrov
01-20-2007, 08:34 AM
I just met Mr. Pokela. Unfortunately he didn't have time to answer all my question, but...


His first impression whilst seing this plane.

He saw his first B-239 on 18th March 1940 when two Brewster flew over him. I just think how great it would be to fly that plane and he did, a year later.


What was the general feeling about the enemy (e.g. they were not considerd better in the air?)

He though all the enemy planes were dangerous. What I understood from his lecture he considered American planes to be the most dangerous ones. In one occasion he shot down a P-39 and the tail of the aeroplane cought fire.


Ask if he as any pictures made during his time operating these planes....and but them on the forum

He had a great collection of color photos from his service at the Tiiksjärvi base. Some of them are published in Finnish literature so I'll try to find them.


Ask if he ever ran the prop by manual pitch control.

When I asked him about this one he answered that it depend on the situation. In one time he crashed a Bf-109 in Germany when the previous pilot had forget to change the pitch to higher gear.<div class="ev_tpc_signature">

"No enemy plane will fly over the reich territory"
Herman Göing