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Waldo.Pepper
07-29-2006, 10:11 PM
Account from Flying Under Fire: Volume Two page 149-150.

The interesting thing is the evasion after the bombs are dropped. I wish it worked this way in the game.

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A voice on the VHF said, "Orange box, bomb doors open." That was us, and along with the rest of the box, we opened the bomb doors. The lead navigator was transmitting corrections to his pilot, and to the rest of the box. All I had to do was hold a good position on Number Four aircraft on my right. The run seemed to go on for a long time; in truth it might have taken all of ten or twelve seconds. It was quite a surprise when we heard several loud bangs."If you hear bursts then you've got holes," we had been told.

In box bombing, the lead navigator in each box transmitted the heading corrections he gave to his pilot, and the box responded as one aircraft by staying tight on the leader. When he called " Bombing, bombing, GO!," all six navigators pushed their bomb release buttons together. The leader usually aimed to undershoot the target slightly, and the correspondingly slight lag in response from the other five observers tended to lay an optimum pattern across the target.

After the bomb doors were closed, we began an almost leisurely climbing turn to the right. This caused us to slow down, and felt wrong, but the flak gradually fell away. This was one of my first practical lessons in tactics. The natural instinct to dive away from a target was a bad one. As we climbed away, we could hear other boxes on their bombing runs. Levelling off, we made slow turns every ten or twelve seconds accompanied by changes in altitude to keep ahead of the time the Wehrmacht anti-aircraft predictors required to read our heading and altitude.

Kernow
07-30-2006, 08:17 AM
Originally posted by Waldo.Pepper:
Account from Flying Under Fire: Volume Two page 149-150.

The interesting thing is the evasion after the bombs are dropped. I wish it worked this way in the game.

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...

Levelling off, we made slow turns every ten or twelve seconds accompanied by changes in altitude to keep ahead of the time the Wehrmacht anti-aircraft predictors required to read our heading and altitude.

Actually, I think it does work a bit like that. I find if I turn while being attacked by 88s and the like, that the flak dies away for a while and the puffs tend to appear where I would have been had I stayed on course. As the puffs start to appear in front of me again it's time for another change of heading and/or altitude.