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View Full Version : Semi-OT - bullet impacts at 1 million fps



na85
10-09-2009, 02:50 AM
Bullet impacts at 1 megaframe per second.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QfDoQwIAaXg

Engadin
10-09-2009, 04:05 AM
Beautiful! At that ultra high speeds bullets behave like liquid metal drops smashing against a wall. Love it, thanks.

DKoor
10-09-2009, 05:01 AM
This makes all those pics with aircraft that received several dozen bullets and made it back even more impressive. At ~7:40 it can be nicely seen the bullets that rotate... they are probably shoot from special(?) barrels (my English is not THAT good lol http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ) for greater penetration http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif .

Video is very impressive itself... physics in frames http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif .

DKoor
10-09-2009, 05:17 AM
Haha luv the buckshot frames in the end http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ... would be awesome if that could be used in airwarfare... I'm afraid that's not possible because buckshot quickly loses power... but. One can only guess http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif .

Flight_boy1990
10-09-2009, 05:42 AM
Since we talk about slow motion footage:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sHTJAKN-5k

Now go tell me how easily an .50 cal BMG can set a FW-190 on fire,when it have problems dealing with "simple" Katana. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif

Choctaw111
10-09-2009, 06:09 AM
I thought I had seen them all on Youtube, but this one is new. Great movie. Thanks for sharing.

Edit...Not only is it 10 minutes long, but by far the best I have seen. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

M_Gunz
10-09-2009, 06:18 AM
I had a book from the early 30's titled "The Fighting Tanks" on then-tank history and design. It was
reviewed favorably by then-Col Patton. In it there was the issue of "bullet splash" where a bullet hit
up to 7 inches away from a view-slot (without a raised lip around it) or other flush hole would not only
go in but would bring a lot of the rest of the flattened bullet with it. Even a flattened like liquid
30 cal bullet can still cause injury after flowing around a corner.

I think that only happens with solid or mostly lead type bullets. AP.. I doubt that the core flows.

Choctaw111
10-09-2009, 06:41 AM
Yeah, I was going to mention the part showing the sloped armor.
Putting lips around view ports was a good idea.
I am sure they did extensive tests to show how well the "lips" would protect the crew. If only the engineers back then could have seen movies like this.

M_Gunz
10-09-2009, 06:47 AM
Originally posted by DKoor:
This makes all those pics with aircraft that received several dozen bullets and made it back even more impressive. At ~7:40 it can be nicely seen the bullets that rotate... they are probably shoot from special(?) barrels (my English is not THAT good lol http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ) for greater penetration http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif .

Video is very impressive itself... physics in frames http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif .

Special barrel? Yes, a rifle barrel which is not smoothbore like a shotgun, musket or many highspeed tank guns.
Special perhaps before 1870....

Every one of those bullets with the angled grooves on the sides are rotating at extremely high speed. Those are rifling
marks made by the gunbarrel rifling as the bullet was spun up on it's way through the barrel. The series at about 7:40
look to be jacketed bullets just by the way the outer skin holds up even as it peels on impact. Lead is softer.

Before that there were even airgun pellets shown and they have spin too, but you won't see it.

M2 50 cal had one rotation per 14 inches (35 cm) of travel, and I didn't see anything move that far including the birdshot
in the last examples that was surely fired at very close range. Consider that at 2800 fps the bullet is spinning 2400
revolutions per second, 144,000 revolutions per minute. Compare to 3,000 rpm P-47 engine!

DuckyFluff
10-09-2009, 08:59 AM
There for all you doubters is the solid PROOF .50 cal can BOUNCE and penetrate Tiger Tank armour QED http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/icon_twisted.gif

Lt_Letum
10-09-2009, 09:14 AM
Originally posted by DKoor:
Haha luv the buckshot frames in the end http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif ... would be awesome if that could be used in airwarfare... I'm afraid that's not possible because buckshot quickly loses power... but. One can only guess http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif .

88mm flak is close after it explodes.
The Yamato's 9x 46cm incendiary AAA flechette shells are even closer.

Lt_Letum
10-09-2009, 09:32 AM
Just watched the vid.
Hard not to imagine flesh on the water impact shots.
Grim.

horseback
10-09-2009, 10:15 AM
Originally posted by Flight_boy1990:
Since we talk about slow motion footage:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sHTJAKN-5k

Now go tell me how easily an .50 cal BMG can set a FW-190 on fire,when it have problems dealing with "simple" Katana. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif So what you're saying is that the bullets used in the video were definitely AP or APIT and that the FW 190 is made of tempered carbon steel folded over on itself 1,000 times or more and honed to a razor edge?

cheers

horseback

Flight_boy1990
10-09-2009, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by horseback:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Flight_boy1990:
Since we talk about slow motion footage:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sHTJAKN-5k

Now go tell me how easily an .50 cal BMG can set a FW-190 on fire,when it have problems dealing with "simple" Katana. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif So what you're saying is that the bullets used in the video were definitely AP or APIT and that the FW 190 is made of tempered carbon steel folded over on itself 1,000 times or more and honed to a razor edge?

cheers

horseback </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No.I was sarcastic.
I.E. I was kidding.Is it forbidden? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

squareusr
10-09-2009, 11:02 AM
Originally posted by DKoor:
would be awesome if that could be used in airwarfare... I'm afraid that's not possible because buckshot quickly loses power... but. One can only guess http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif .

Modern day air defense autocannon (yes, they still exist in our age of missiles and are even advertised to be useful against incoming artillery shells thanks to advanced radar guidance) use tiny timed charges to transform a single compact projectile into a cloud of smaller kinetic impactors at the desired distance from the target.

horseback
10-09-2009, 12:22 PM
Originally posted by Flight_boy1990:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by horseback:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Flight_boy1990:
Since we talk about slow motion footage:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-sHTJAKN-5k

Now go tell me how easily an .50 cal BMG can set a FW-190 on fire,when it have problems dealing with "simple" Katana. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif So what you're saying is that the bullets used in the video were definitely AP or APIT and that the FW 190 is made of tempered carbon steel folded over on itself 1,000 times or more and honed to a razor edge?

cheers

horseback </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No.I was sarcastic.
I.E. I was kidding.Is it forbidden? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>So was I. On the subject of the .50 cal, sarcasm should be required.

cheers

horseback

TS_Sancho
10-09-2009, 02:13 PM
That was a treat, thanks for sharing.

A few of those sequences gives one a new appreciation for the word spalling.

DKoor
10-09-2009, 05:43 PM
Originally posted by squareusr:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DKoor:
would be awesome if that could be used in airwarfare... I'm afraid that's not possible because buckshot quickly loses power... but. One can only guess http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif .

Modern day air defense autocannon (yes, they still exist in our age of missiles and are even advertised to be useful against incoming artillery shells thanks to advanced radar guidance) use tiny timed charges to transform a single compact projectile into a cloud of smaller kinetic impactors at the desired distance from the target. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>Aaaa... now that's nasty http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif .

AndyJWest
10-09-2009, 06:51 PM
Aaaa... now that's nasty
If you think that is nasty DKoor, you should consider what modern Air-TO-Air Missiles do. This is from the 'Lock On' reference manual:


Target Destruction

The warheads used in AAMs are typically blast-fragmentation, creating a cloud of incendiary/explosive pellets or an expanding metal rod. Blast fragmentation warheads cause damage through the combined effects of the explosive shock wave and high-velocity fragments (usually pieces of the warhead casing). Pellet designs are similar, except some of the fragments are actually small bomblets that explode or burn on contact with, or penetration of, the target. The damage to airborne targets from blast effect alone is not usually great unless the missile actually hits the target. Fragments tend to spread out from the point of the explosion, rapidly losing killing power as miss distance increases. Pellets reduce this problem somewhat since a single hit can do more damage. The expanding rod warheads have metal rods densely packed on the lateral surface of an
explosive charge in one or several layers. The ends of these rods are welded in pairs, so that while spreading after the explosion of the charge, they form a solid, extending, spiral-shaped ring.