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View Full Version : The Veterans thread. Tell us you served. Share your thoughts.



Choctaw111
01-21-2007, 06:21 AM
I hope you mods don't mind that I bring this back. I just wanted to see if we had any newer members who are/were soldiers.


After the forums were down from yesterday I was really looking forward to checking out that thread again and writing down the names of the people who said we could talk sometime and to my HORROR...well, we know that a lot of threads and posts are missing now. I am just trying to keep a thread going that someone else started so if we could get this thread going again I think it was really headed in a good direction, a place where vets could meet other vets and for those who are struggling to get support from others who know what PTSD is all about. It could be like a group clinic of sorts where we all have some bad military experiences in common (as well as IL2). There is a lot of money that the US government is hanging on to (and doesn't want to let go of) and we as vets, especially disabled vets like me have to go after it and make them give it to us. It shouldn't have to be that way but unfortunately it is. The government sent us to some place nobody really cares about and then once we come back home (not everyone comes home...alive) I feel like a used up asset that the government has no use for anymore.
For those of you who responded in the last thread please respond again and for those other vets out there from all nations please post your thoughts in here.

Monterey13
01-21-2007, 07:01 AM
U.S.Navy Veteran
FC-Tomahawk and Harpoon Weapon Systems
Desert Shield/Storm Era.
Currently drawing disability for a broken back suffered in extremely high seas.

M2morris
01-21-2007, 09:15 AM
U.S Army Veteran
March 1986 - April 2006(retired)
1st Amored Div
32nd AADCOM (Patriot Missile)
82nd AB Div (504th Parachute Infantry Regt, 82nd Aviation Regt)
10th Special Forces Group
Still trying to adjust to civilian life.

KSS_Buglord_UK
01-21-2007, 09:28 AM
Hi choc m8 dont know if you saw my original post , i was just saying if you need to ever have a chat m8 as you know im on comms with ya most sundays im here if you need me bud. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif And yes ive had to use my old squad name as mine (buglord) is a bit messed up at the moment.

RAF74_Raptor
01-21-2007, 10:51 AM
US Army Veteran

2000 to 2004

Dont Know if you saw my original post either I am not diganosed with PTSD but the sounds of certain firecrackers still scare me to death if you need to talk Im here

Choctaw111
01-21-2007, 11:12 AM
Originally posted by M2morris:
U.S Army Veteran
March 1986 - April 2006(retired)
1st Amored Div
32nd AADCOM (Patriot Missile)
82nd AB Div (504th Parachute Infantry Regt, 82nd Aviation Regt)
10th Special Forces Group
Still trying to adjust to civilian life.

STRIKE HOLD M2morris. That was a good outfit. That was one of the proudest times of my life wearing the All American patch on my shoulder.

RAF74_Raptor
01-21-2007, 11:40 AM
Yeah but I liked the 101 better

M2morris
01-21-2007, 01:02 PM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:

STRIKE HOLD M2morris. That was a good outfit. That was one of the proudest times of my life wearing the All American patch on my shoulder.

Wow! thats great to hear someone say Strike Hold, thanks Choctaw, finally someone who knows. Same here as far as pride goes, I was in A co, 1st Bn 504th (Red Devils).

Choctaw111
01-21-2007, 03:47 PM
Originally posted by M2morris:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Choctaw111:

STRIKE HOLD M2morris. That was a good outfit. That was one of the proudest times of my life wearing the All American patch on my shoulder.

Wow! thats great to hear someone say Strike Hold, thanks Choctaw, finally someone who knows. Same here as far as pride goes, I was in A co, 1st Bn 504th (Red Devils). </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

B/2/504 for me. Here is a pic of my Tempest that Jesters-Ink did for me. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif We are always looking for other good pilots in the 23rd/33rd squadron. If anyone is interested please check out our website and see about flying with us. Here is our website. http://raf23sqn.dogfighters.net/
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v343/PublicPhotoAccount2/TempestDevil.jpg

Eagle_361st
01-21-2007, 04:11 PM
USMC Vet 1992(DEP)-2006
24MEU 1/8 2Bn C Co.

I also have been diagnosed as suffering from PTSD although I am classified as "slight". I can relate to what you have going on upstairs. You need an outlet for it and get it off your chest no matter how hard it may be. That has helped me more than anything else in my recovery. Feel free to contact me, I would be more than willing to aid in any way I can or to just be a shoulder to lean on brother.

WWMaxGunz
01-21-2007, 04:36 PM
Choctaw, have you made contact with the VVLP?
That is the Vietnam Veterans Leadership Program and buddy there are guys there that know
--exactly-- where you're at. They are a great bunch and you don't have to be a Vietnam
Vet to go there or join. Check them out if you haven't!

I'm a vet and have been through the rough end of things. 10 months of operations and only
5 months of money, I can tell you that if it wasn't for veterans programs that I would not
have survived.

I go downtown and see the guys homeless and sitting on the sidewalk. Some really are, I
know and some have a room somewhere and are professional beggars. I don't have much to
give as I have been disabled but I do give to the worst and I always ask if they are vets.
If they are then I give them a card to the HCHV team (health care for homeless veterans)
that also has a budget (which was many times bigger BEFORE Jan 2001 when the 'friend of
the veterans' slashed it along with many hopes -- that's okay, we need more guys that have
fewer choices right?) to put those same into a program that lets them get restarted...
well it used to allow 3 months including work program at min wage, room and board to get
out or stay and pay the monthly of the room and board. Since 2001 it is 1 month only and
about half the slots but HEY, compared to non-vets at least there is a program at all!

See the difference? Go on the web and find out what civ homeless have for resources.
Check for dead links as there's more of those than not.
We vets do have the VA at all and in spite of the f_ckups (I went through what I did because
of a number of those which can't be sued over it turned out, oh well!) it is still far more
than non-vets get. Well, at least until the cut more all the time budget runs out.

Somebody cares and no place our guys go is unknown or not cared about by everyone.
The guy so many vets loved to hate did not f_ck us as bad as the guy we have now, go figure.

jarink
01-21-2007, 04:56 PM
11 year US Army vet (combined Reserves and active)

1985-1996
Active duty 1990-1994 all with A/101MI Bn, 1st Infantry Div. (incl. Desert Shield/Storm)
1985-1989 I was a 96B Intelligence Analyst
1989-1996 98G (Russian) Linguist, doing radio intercept/DF and jamming.

RAF74_Raptor
01-21-2007, 06:50 PM
It is a crying shame what has been done to us here I wont get to posty because I dont want to get this thread locked but its good to hear that most of the other veterans have the same feelings that i do towards the administration

wayno7777
01-21-2007, 08:04 PM
6 year US Army vet (combined Reserves and active).
1976-1982 UH-1H Crewchief/ mechanic.
4/507th Med Co. (AA) MAST Ft. Sill, OK
68th Med Det, (AA) Wheeler AFB (Schoefield Barracks 25th Inf. Div.), Wahiawa, Hawaii.

I hope you saw my post in the other thread.
Hope to see you at Reading....

stelr
01-21-2007, 09:04 PM
Choctaw111 & M2morris:

Just FYI, the proud RED DEVILs just departed again this month for Bagdad.

They went out attached to TF Falcon (2/82) who was the DRB when the call came for more forces.

I served 30 years in the Army myself. 16 of which were at FT Bragg with the greatest DIV in the world: the 82D Airplane Gang, as well as 1st SOCOM and 7th SFG(A).

Vetern of Desert Shield/Desert Storm; OEF and OIF.

I take out my PTSD in here. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Retired now...what I miss most are the troopers. Gotta love Joe. Nothing like a bunch of LGOPs running around a DZ at night getting it done.

S!

WWMaxGunz
01-21-2007, 11:33 PM
You go through many keyboards, Stelr?

Choctaw111
01-22-2007, 06:33 AM
This is turning into a fine thread. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif Thanks for the info about them shipping out again Stelr. I will try to get some contact info and send them some stuff through my American Legion post (I am the Sr. Vice Cmdr there). It was always nice getting stuff from folks back in the states.

GH_Klingstroem
01-22-2007, 06:54 AM
when u mean, veteran, I assume that u mean guys that have actually seen combat or at least have been used operationally in a combat zone?!?!

Choctaw111
01-22-2007, 08:20 AM
Originally posted by GH_Klingstroem:
when u mean, veteran, I assume that u mean guys that have actually seen combat or at least have been used operationally in a combat zone?!?!

No. When I say veteran it refers to ANYONE who has served in the armed forces. Those that have served in the armed forces knew that there was a chance that their government could use them for their skills in an "operational" environment (I put this in the past tense but it of coarse goes for those who are still serving). Not everyone in the service will be deployed but these days that chance is more likely than ever. There are many people out there who dislike their government for the choices they make as to where they send their soldiers. For those that feel this way please keep in mind that the soldiers are just doing their jobs. They are called and they go. This is more directed to those that have not served and are not happy with the way things are going right now in the world. Please be kind to the soldiers. For those who were deployed, and in a lesser part those that were not, have suffered through things that most people cannot even begin to understand. When you see one while you're out and about, please thank a vet for everything that you have, appreciate or maybe even take for granted. Without the veterans we would have nothing that we have today. I am very proud in the fact of knowing that everything I have today I have earned, not from the financial standpoint, which is what a non vet might say, but from the fact that everything I have is a direct result of freedom and I along with so many others have helped pay for it.

Eagle_361st
01-22-2007, 08:28 AM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by GH_Klingstroem:
when u mean, veteran, I assume that u mean guys that have actually seen combat or at least have been used operationally in a combat zone?!?!

No. When I say veteran it refers to ANYONE who has served in the armed forces. Those that have served in the armed forces knew that there was a chance that their government could use them for their skills in an "operational" environment (I put this in the past tense but it of coarse goes for those who are still serving). Not everyone in the service will be deployed but these days that chance is more likely than ever. There are many people out there who dislike their government for the choices they make as to where they send their soldiers. For those that feel this way please keep in mind that the soldiers are just doing their jobs. They are called and they go. This is more directed to those that have not served and are not happy with the way things are going right now in the world. Please be kind to the soldiers. For those who were deployed, and in a lesser part those that were not, have suffered through things that most people cannot even begin to understand. When you see one while you're out and about, please thank a vet for everything that you have, appreciate or maybe even take for granted. Without the veterans we would have nothing that we have today. I am very proud in the fact of knowing that everything I have today I have earned, not from the financial standpoint, which is what a non vet might say, but from the fact that everything I have is a direct result of freedom and I along with so many others have helped pay for it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Could not have been better put than that. We serve our country, not it's politics.

RAF74_Raptor
01-22-2007, 10:19 AM
Well Said

triggerhappyfin
01-22-2007, 02:00 PM
What kind of veterans do you honor here?

JG52_Helgstrand
01-22-2007, 02:49 PM
US Navy 89-95 Aviation Machinist Mate (jet engine mech)
VAQ 132 (Prowlers) aboard USS Saratoga (Gulf War one)
NAS Sigonella Sicily 'AIMD' (T-56 mech)
NAS Pensacola training aircrew

I'm a Gulf War one vet and disabled due to Gulf War Illness caused by experimental vaccines, Anthrax etc. Won't go into details but it's getting worse and the VA is no help.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v117/Helgstrand/Ribbons.gif

Choctaw111
01-22-2007, 04:21 PM
Originally posted by triggerhappyfin:
What kind of veterans do you honor here?

I would say ALL. Soldiers, whatever their nationality answered their nations call and there is much honor in that.

Andrewsdad
01-22-2007, 05:17 PM
From a grateful American to all of you vets.
God Bless and Thank You !!!

My son is DEP'ed into the United States Marine Corps and will ship to boot camp in mid-July.
Your prayers for him and all who serve are much coveted.

As for me.. well I tried to enlist in the Navy back in 1971. Bad skin condition kept me out.
Oh well, I often wonder how my life would have been if one Navy doctor had not made the decision he made.

Salute !!
AD

Choctaw111
01-23-2007, 06:11 AM
Originally posted by Andrewsdad:
From a grateful American to all of you vets.
God Bless and Thank You !!!

My son is DEP'ed into the United States Marine Corps and will ship to boot camp in mid-July.
Your prayers for him and all who serve are much coveted.

As for me.. well I tried to enlist in the Navy back in 1971. Bad skin condition kept me out.
Oh well, I often wonder how my life would have been if one Navy doctor had not made the decision he made.

Salute !!
AD

I know several people who tried to enlist but due to physical problems were turned away. I also know a few people who were all just talk about wanting to do it but never did anything about it. Maybe they talked to a recruiter once or twice but that's it. There are those who actually went to MEPS to sign their name on the dotted line even though they were turned away for one reason or another. THAT IS SHOWING THE WILLINGNESS TO SERVE in the armed forces and you have done that Andrewsdad. You could beat yourself up for the rest of your life wondering what could have been. We all could think about what life would be like if things would have only turned out differently.
Coming from me I want you to sleep well at night knowing that you were willing to serve this country when there are so many people out there who just don't give a rip about this nation or how we have or keep our freedom. I will keep your son in my prayers as I pray for all of our troops under the big flag at the VA when I am there 3 times a week. It sits up on top of a hill overlooking a valley. I get there just about 7:15 in the morning and it is so peaceful up there and I have a few quiet moments as I watch the sun rise.

Breeze147
01-23-2007, 06:16 AM
U.S. Air Force - 1966 to 1970

Combat Security Police.

Vietnam tour, Okinawa, Korea.

wayno7777
01-23-2007, 08:25 PM
This deserves to be on page one....
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zoinks_
01-23-2007, 09:19 PM
U.S. Air Force - Desert Shield
F-15 Avionics
Elmendorf AFB - Anchorage, AK

i was in basic training when the war started. after tech school, i served my tour at Elmendorf. our wing never deployed.

i have no respect for the administration.

i wish everyone the best, you've earned and deserve it.

RAF74_Raptor
01-24-2007, 06:15 AM
Hey zoinks I was on FT Richardson AK Nice to see someone from elmendorf

Worf101
01-24-2007, 06:48 AM
5th Ash and Trash Ft. Lost in the Woods Misery
8th Engineers SE Asia
2nd Engineers TDC, Korea
"Essayons" Let Us Try!!!!

Da Worfster

FA_Retro-Burn
01-24-2007, 07:43 AM
10 years, U.S. Air Force
1988 - 1998 Secure Telecommunications Technician / Red Switch
Desert Shield/Storm
20CS Shaw AFB, SC.

WWSensei
01-24-2007, 07:52 AM
My father: 1960-1988, SMSgt, USAF
Me: 1988-1995, Capt, USAF
My brother: 1995-2006, TSgt, USAF

46 years of continuous service.

TX-Gunslinger
01-24-2007, 09:37 AM
My Father:
USMC Korean War - Corporal - Infantry - Chosin. Eventual permanent mental disability 100%. After the war, he went on to college, finished medical school and obtained an MD. Suffered a series of Nervous Breakdowns after his internship. You know what happened to an MD in 1958 when you had a nervous disorder? Well, you were not allowed to continue to be an MD. The last 20 years of his life, he lived as a recluse in a small apartment near the VA Hospital in Big Spring TX. I really loved my Dad, but did not get to spend that much time with him. His condition did not manifest itself until several years after the war - then got progressively worse as time went on.

My Uncle: US Army - 2nd/1st Lieutenant, Infantry Korean War, majority of the conflict. Never seemed to suffer from PTSD at all.

My Great Uncle: USAAF - USAF 1939 to 1953. Major. B25 - B29 Bombardier. Great and gentle man. After leaving the Air Force, he became a portrait photographer for the rest of his life. When I was young, I could never understand why he would "throw it all away" for such a quiet existence. Of course, I perfectly understand now.

My Son-in-Law
US Army - Staff Sergeant - Airborne - Currently on the ground in Baghdad since September, while my daughter is by herself in Germany.

Me:
US Navy 14 years
1975 - 1979 USS Johnston (DD-821) - STGSN-STG3
1979 - 1981 US Naval Facility Pacific Beach WA - OTA3 - OTA2
1981 - 1983 Commander Fleet Air Intelligence and Reconnaissance Force U.S. Sixth Fleet, Sigonella Sicily - OTA2 - OTA1
1983 - 1986 US Naval Facility Adak Alaska - OTA1
1986 - 1989 Commander U.S. Naval Surface Force - OTAC (Ocean Systems Technician (Analyst)Chief Petty Officer) Coronado, CA

Funny thing is, I've been working in the same "field" since then. I'm writing this tonight from the U.S. Naval Station, Yokosuka Japan. Spent a good part of the day aboard USS Kitty Hawk - thinking occasionally about my friends in the Il2 community who I wish I could bring with me.

We don't have a great track record, of taking care of our vets. The best job we ever did was after WWII. However, most of those benefits are all gone now. Although I earned my GI Bill, my educational benefits were taken away by the Reagan administration.

By the way, the largest pay raise as a percentage of my base pay I ever received in the military was in 1977/78 as I recall. The one thing I'm sure about is that the President was not Ronald Reagan, it was actually Jimmy Carter. Remember, Carter actually was a Veteran.

A really great historical period to look at, is the period that the WWI Vets (Bonus Marchers) marched on Washington and camped out in what is now Anacostia. The Depression was in full swing and Hoover was still President. Here is a link to this disgusting chapter in U.S. History - http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/macarthur/peopleevents/pandeAMEX89.html

Central figures in this episode - Herbert Hoover, Douglas MacArther and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Read the link if you are not familiar with the episode.

I cry inside when I see and hear how the maimed, disabled and injured veterans - both emotionally and physically are treated in the long term.

This is one of the many reasons, quite simply that I believe the draft should be re-instated. Only when the human cost is more equally distributed among the classes, do vets even stand a chance. This was the case in WWII.

When the majority of households across this country are affected by war; when it's everyone's children that might be at risk; then maybe the public won't quite so willing to start a war under strategically and operationally asinine conditions in the first place.

One thing that I will never understand about my countrymen, is why in the heck they elect leaders with little or no military experience and then fully support massive, militarily unsound adventures, by these commander-in-chiefs. LBJ comes to mind almost immediately.

The people forget. They always forget. Of course, ultimately it is THE PEOPLE and their choices, which most significantly impact those who work and fight to keep Liberty.

S~

Gunny

Little_Walt
01-24-2007, 11:19 AM
Originally posted by jarink:
11 year US Army vet (combined Reserves and active)

1989-1996 98G (Russian) Linguist, doing radio intercept/DF and jamming.

98G2LRU, USM5 (Berlin), 1977-1979. Worked in an air-conditioned building with no windows for two years, never got shot at nor much chance of it, but our "brag" (and all units everywhere have one http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ) was that in that part of the Cold War, we were one of the few units actually doing our real mission against a real threat. Maybe a bit of exaggeration there, but most brags are.

It occurs to me that I may have operated against people who wore a Soviet uniform in those days and who read this forum now. No hard feelings, guys, it was just business. In any case, there are surely non-US veterans who read the forum. With that in mind, S! to everyone who ever wore their country's uniform.

Those who served in VN (or know someone who did) may want to have a look at www.no-quarter.org (http://www.no-quarter.org) . The site is a bit moribund now, but I was one of two people involved in setting it up back in 1996 (though I am no longer involved with the project).

FWIW, my father served in the 29th Mobile Repair and Reclamation Squadron, 9th US Air Force during WWII, mostly working on P47s.

My great-great-grandfather served as a "high private" in the 6th North Carolina State Troops during the War Between the States, present and accounted for at both First Manassas and Appomattox (and many points in between).

Last but not least, those of you with recent military experience, remember your OPSEC. "They" _are_ listening (I was one, I know). http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

S! to everyone.

Little_Walt
US Army 1975-1979

zoinks_
01-24-2007, 11:29 AM
Originally posted by RAF74_Raptor:
Hey zoinks I was on FT Richardson AK Nice to see someone from elmendorf
right back at ya!

i ran into a bunch of FT Richarson's boys in humvees when i fishing at 'mosquito pond' behind the bases. funny sight me in my beat up 1980 oldsmobile surrounded during some exercise. none of us knew where we were back there...except the mosquitos.

jarink
01-24-2007, 12:59 PM
Originally posted by Little_Walt:
98G2LRU, USM5 (Berlin), 1977-1979. Worked in an air-conditioned building with no windows for two years, never got shot at nor much chance of it, but our "brag" (and all units everywhere have one http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif ) was that in that part of the Cold War, we were one of the few units actually doing our real mission against a real threat. Maybe a bit of exaggeration there, but most brags are.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
I never did field station duty. I was always (cue dramatic martial music) tactical. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif Of course, that meant I never got to do my job for real. The closest I came was in D.S. when we could pick up PVO and various civilian stuff on HF. (We got some ham operators from the US, too.)

Since we're including relatives, I had 3 grandfathers that served in WWII. One in the 82nd Abn (glider infantry, not a paratrooper). He was wounded in Italy and never really talked about his service. My paternal grandfather was a B-17 bombardier (see my sig). My step-grandfather was a mortarman in the USMC and fought on Tulagi, Guadalcanal and Saipan.

My stepfather was a Marine infantryman in Da Nang 67-68.

I currently have a nephew in the Marines who does UAV maintenance. He's due back for his third 6-month rotation in Iraq in two months.

Heliopause
01-24-2007, 01:55 PM
Didn't know the thread exited..

Recently joined the club myself.
http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b334/PauseHelio/Veteraan.jpg

Saw some Bosnia, Iraq and Afganistan. Mostly airfields as I was a (Dutch) airforce heli mechanic.
2001-2006

Father spend time in East Java '48/49

WWMaxGunz
01-24-2007, 02:07 PM
Tomorrow is Friday.

In the US (at this time by why not everywhere?) there is a movement to show solidarity with
our troops. The idea being that people will see this more and more, that any camera used
in public on Fridays will pick this up and the knowing, the voice of solidarity will be
heard.

It is simple. Wear something red on Fridays. Visibility counts but I'm not going Santa Suit!
Bad enough I got the beard and the size, people crack enough jokes and little kids stare so
no way I'm getting red pants! But I do have a red jacket and a red scarf, gonna look into
a red shirt.

Why red? Same reason we have red in the flag, boyos!

WWMaxGunz
01-24-2007, 02:17 PM
Oh btw, civ world funnies.

My VA issued photo ID is good for buying controlled sudafed at the drug store but --
not good enough for my bank clerk. It's a FEDERAL ID card!

I tell em, the same fingerprints that can place me at the scene of a crime and are
registered should be all the proof I need of who TF I am. Documents can be falsified
but these are my fingers and anyone can see I'm not wearing any Mission Impossible
tricks.

================================================== ====================================

Why do people attach little flags to their cars and keep them out at night, in the rain
and worse, until they are in tatters and yet have the nerve to say they are patriotic?

S#!+! They spent a buck or two for something to make an empty statement. They HAVE no
respect for the flag and little for the country, they are just a bunch of "meeee tooo"
SHEEP!

Sorry but that's something that has p!zzed me off since 2001. Show some care, dammit!

Choctaw111
01-24-2007, 04:46 PM
Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:
Oh btw, civ world funnies.

My VA issued photo ID is good for buying controlled sudafed at the drug store but --
not good enough for my bank clerk. It's a FEDERAL ID card!

I tell em, the same fingerprints that can place me at the scene of a crime and are
registered should be all the proof I need of who TF I am. Documents can be falsified
but these are my fingers and anyone can see I'm not wearing any Mission Impossible
tricks.

================================================== ====================================

Why do people attach little flags to their cars and keep them out at night, in the rain
and worse, until they are in tatters and yet have the nerve to say they are patriotic?

S#!+! They spent a buck or two for something to make an empty statement. They HAVE no
respect for the flag and little for the country, they are just a bunch of "meeee tooo"
SHEEP!

Sorry but that's something that has p!zzed me off since 2001. Show some care, dammit!

This really IS turning into a good thread. Keep the posts comin'.

RAF74_Raptor
01-25-2007, 12:17 AM
Originally posted by zoinks_:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RAF74_Raptor:
Hey zoinks I was on FT Richardson AK Nice to see someone from elmendorf
right back at ya!

i ran into a bunch of FT Richarson's boys in humvees when i fishing at 'mosquito pond' behind the bases. funny sight me in my beat up 1980 oldsmobile surrounded during some exercise. none of us knew where we were back there...except the mosquitos. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Those mosiqutoes were huge

Choctaw111
01-25-2007, 03:38 PM
Any other vets care to step forward or share some of their stories, maybe some of the lighter side of things?

zoinks_
01-25-2007, 05:16 PM
lighter side = air force basic training. lots of funny stuff there.

in basic our barracks had 2 flights, an upper and lower level, and we had females in the lower - our sister flight. anyone entering the bay had to pass the dorm guard who made sure the door was locked and secured. everyone had to show their id and have it checked against the authorized list to gain entrance with the exception of the immediate TI's (training instructors) and their assistants who were admitted upon visual recognition. the dorm guard was to stand at the small window in the door and keep watch.

of course, personel would try and enter with a micro-second id flash then berate the guard for incompetance. some would try and trick the guard into letting them in although they weren't on the authorization list by yelling, refusing to flash their id a second time claiming they were on the list, and of course more yelling.

protocol for TI's and their assistants with visual recognition was to make sure the door was opened so their stride was not impeded. protocol for a female was for the dorm guard to announce "female entering the bay" and wait a few moments for folks to locate their britches if needed.

on one occasion, the female TI approached and the guard opened the door without the announcement then quickly realized his error and stuck out both arms elbows locked to try and stop her. she proceded to walk chest first into his opened hands.

from that moment on, whenever we marched with our sister flight, she would ask "where's my boyfriend" and he was forced to march about 5 feet behind her everywhere we went.

Choctaw111
01-26-2007, 04:28 PM
This thread was starting to become way too buried, so...

M2morris
01-26-2007, 05:15 PM
On the lighter side-
This back-woods country kid gets dafted into the Army, and he notices on his first day in the service that soon after they issue him a comb they sit him down and shave his head. Later that day they issue him a toothbrush and then they sit him down again and pull three of his teeth. Later, they issue him a jockstrap, so the kid goes AWOL.

Choctaw111
01-26-2007, 06:50 PM
Originally posted by M2morris:
On the lighter side-
This back-woods country kid gets dafted into the Army, and he notices on his first day in the service that soon after they issue him a comb they sit him down and shave his head. Later that day they issue him a toothbrush and then they sit him down again and pull three of his teeth. Later, they issue him a jockstrap, so the kid goes AWOL.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif That one had me laughing pretty good!!!

WWMaxGunz
01-26-2007, 09:14 PM
Just saw "Flags of Our Fathers" at the budget cinema.
Vets with bad memories should I believe stay away from it.
Really good film but it might not be worth what it could bring up during the battle scenes.
They go beyond Saving Pvt Ryan in terms of visual grit and emotion-acting.
The sentiments though and the message... it's like a war version of Unforgiven to me.

Choctaw111
01-27-2007, 07:18 AM
Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:
Just saw "Flags of Our Fathers" at the budget cinema.
Vets with bad memories should I believe stay away from it.
Really good film but it might not be worth what it could bring up during the battle scenes.
They go beyond Saving Pvt Ryan in terms of visual grit and emotion-acting.
The sentiments though and the message... it's like a war version of Unforgiven to me.

I went to see that with my grandfather. He was there with the 5th Marine division and was in the same outfit as Jack Lucas, the youngest MoH recipient since the Civil War. Jack and my Grandfather still stay in touch. My grandfather was hit by a Japanese mortar shell, and hit in the legs, on the "meat grinder" after fighting on the island for 2 weeks. After spending months in Physical Rehabilitation at Pearl he finished his time in Japan and spent some time at Nagasaki. He has been denied any compensation by the government for his exposure to radiation there. My grandfather and one other person are all that remain in our area of the Iwo Jima veterans. They were invited to a private viewing of the movie. Here is a pic of my family and I after we saw the movie and my grandfathers second time seeing it. I am glad I saw it with him. He has told me about it for as long as I can remember and as I got older the things he told me became more graphic. That may be a large part as to why I wanted to enlist in the military. I was so proud of him and his contribution to freedom and I wanted to be a part of that. Here is another pic of me and his friend from Iwo ,Jack Lucas, MoH recipient who happened to be at the WW2 weekend a last year. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v343/PublicPhotoAccount2/DSC03551-1.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v343/PublicPhotoAccount2/DSC03157-1.jpg

Red_Russian13
01-27-2007, 01:52 PM
USMC, Intel Got out a Sgt (E-5)
1998-2002.

Thinking about going back in. I'd be a Gunny by now though...had I stayed in.

WWMaxGunz
01-28-2007, 01:57 AM
You don't say about what he thought about the movie but it was his second time watching it.
Pass the tissues and don't say you didn't leak. Know what I mean?

Mysticpuma2003
01-28-2007, 03:44 AM
This is no more from me than a thank you to all of you have have served your countries.

As a Press Photographer I spent a month on detachment with the Hereford and Worcester Sherwood Foresters in Northern Ireland during the conflicts.

Every day the guys would face snipers and the possibility of being shot down in their Lynx Helicopters. During my flights with them, you could tell they (and I) were nervous, and then touch-down and run for the hedge line.

Taking the difficult route across country to avoid booby traps, and then sprinting for the station along a road which was known to have sniper attacks before....man that was adrenalin pumping!

On one journey in a Landrover, the vehicle in front of us was hit by an IAAG (a canteen sized bake bean tin, with explosive inside, a wooden stick and fins (like a dart)), but fortunately although it detonated, injuries were no more than cuts and bruises.

Another time, we were on a deserted country road, and a tractor pulled out in front of us, and then one fell in behind....both soldiers reached for their guns....but fortunately nothing happened, but that was certainly hair raising!

So, I haven't served, but I have done combat patrols with the guys, and all I can say is I respect anyone who takes the call to arms to preserve my and out freedom......gentlemen S!

Choctaw111
01-28-2007, 05:30 AM
Originally posted by WWMaxGunz:
You don't say about what he thought about the movie but it was his second time watching it.
Pass the tissues and don't say you didn't leak. Know what I mean?

I can't say that he "enjoyed" the movie but it was a time for us as a family to sit down with him and see what it was like without him having to say a word although he did make some commentaries during the film. My Aunt (on the left of the photo) was emotional throughout the movie as was I. She made a comment at the end of the film when we were walking out just before I had the picture taken. She looked at my grandfather and said to him "I cannot believe that any of us are here right now because you shouldn't have lived through that" and then she just started sobbing. As I had said before he had told me about that island since I was in Kindergarten but as I got older the stories became more detailed and more graphic and then to see it on the big screen was really something. He said that it was very accurate. He and I have sat down and talked about some of my experiences and that felt very good to me. I hope that there is a way that I can convey to him all of the things that I went through before he passes on.

HotelBushranger
01-28-2007, 07:15 AM
To all vets who have served,

SALUTE!

You blokes are bloody legends, I hold vets in about as much high esteem as you can get.

Last year was the RAAF's 85th. There was a service at Kings Park here in Perth, which was attended by ex-RAAF vets and also an honour guard of Air Force Cadets, me included. Anyway, after the service I went up to all the chaps who were in a big group, and just thanked them for everything. I can't remember what exactly I said, but I remember saying that they were the stuff of legend. The look on their faces was bloody magnificent.

Triggerhappy, I dunno if you're a vet or not but if ya are mate, feel free to talk about it. From a non-vet point of view threads like these are gold, waayy too many ppl don't pay enough respect or at least time to veterans. Can anyone remember a thread last year, about a couple of bloody dickheads who were urinating on a Canadian war memorial? Bastards.

Family military service:
Grandfather served in the post-war Finnish Air Force as a mechanic. Worked on 109's, 110's and the like.
Great-grandfather on my mums side served as a sapper in World War 1. What's great is we actually hunted down all his records on the Australian war records website, about 35 pages or so. Man, he was in hospital a lot with a lot of injuries. He was gassed in 1918, survived but died after the war. We've still got a Christmas card from the Western Front from 1917, it's an amazing piece of history.

It's bloody bull**** how the US administration treats their vets. Aussie's don't get much better treatment, not as bad but nothing to write home about either, there are still men from WW2, Korea and Vietnam who are fighting to get their service medals.

Anyway, ~S~ to all you guys, you rock.

GonzoX
01-28-2007, 07:46 AM
USN, PN3, 1981-1989
VF-151, USS Midway,
NAS Corpus Christi

Treesqueak
01-28-2007, 04:35 PM
In my sig.

Mike http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/crackwhip.gif

Monterey13
01-28-2007, 07:05 PM
I have a USS Carl Vinson jacket. Are you a small person? If so, I'd send it to you if you wanted it. It's a bit snug for me.

Here is my ship. I am a Plankowner also.
CG-61 (http://webpages.charter.net/paytons4/paytons4/cg61pic.jpg)

Treesqueak
01-29-2007, 12:25 AM
Originally posted by Monterey13:
I have a USS Carl Vinson jacket. Are you a small person? If so, I'd send it to you if you wanted it. It's a bit snug for me.

Here is my ship. I am a Plankowner also.
CG-61 (http://webpages.charter.net/paytons4/paytons4/cg61pic.jpg)

Really? Thanks, but it might be snug on me also, 6'3" 205lbs. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif

How did you get it? I think I still have a foul weather jacket around somewhere. That's about all I have from my ship, save the Plankowner certificate and photos. All the other stuff, bag, shirts coffee cup and such got stolen years ago. Haven't been able to replace them. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-mad.gif

Mike

AI-1
01-29-2007, 05:46 AM
Royal Air Force 1984-2000

Airframe/ Propulsion Tech

Buccaneers, Tornado's, Wessex, Seaking, Hercules.

Never liked the politics, but loved the job and the mates - comradary is king.

sabotshooter88
01-29-2007, 02:05 PM
28 Years in May
Enlisted for 10 Years
Navy for the first 6 (CAG 30 1978-1984 - AMS2)
ARNG for the last 20 in the Armor Community(ACR and pure)
Currently working in Domestic Operations

It's like being on a train, when you see the conductor, it's time to get off.

So far, no conductor

Choctaw111
01-30-2007, 06:56 AM
I have changed the name of the thread. I may do this from time to time to change the discussion topic. I would now like to hear the thoughts from my fellow vets as well as hear from some vets who have not come forward yet. I do understand that this thread will be read by many non vets who greatly enjoy Il2 as we do. It may serve as a little enlightenment to hear some stories from us as to what is it is like to be away from home for a long time in a hostile environment. I am in no way comparing what I did to those of the Second World War but I believe it still takes a special person to volunteer for this kind of life. Just please share what you are comfortable with other people reading. I will share some things in here shortly.

Woof603
01-30-2007, 08:40 AM
Royal Canadian Air Force 1951 - 1957.
NATO:
England - 1953 North Luffenham, Rutland County.
France - 1954-57 Metz/Grostenquin.

AKA_TAGERT
01-30-2007, 09:28 AM
36H Signal Soldier (29NV10)
1984 - 1988 U.S. Army 569th Ord Company 32nd AADCOM (Hawk Missile) Würzburg Germany
1988 - 1991 U.S. Army Inactive Reserve
1992 - 1995 U.S. Army Active Reserve
1995 - 1999 CA Air National Guard

Viking-S
01-30-2007, 09:46 AM
I want to take the opportunity and use this thread to honour Smedley Butler at the time of his death, the most decorated Marine in U.S. history. Butler was awarded the Medal of Honor twice during his career, one of only 19 people to be awarded the medal twice.

"And ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." John 8:

jarink
01-30-2007, 11:24 AM
A quick Desert Storm story...

While we were preparing to deploy to S.A., we had several briefs about what "the plan" was going to be for liberating Kuwait. One of these was fairly detailed and broke things down to Battalion level. By the way, my Company provided what was called "direct support", meaning that our intercept/DF and jamming teams were alloted directly to the 3 manuever Brigades in the Division. With reinforcements, that totalled 5 intercet/DF'ers and 6 jamming teams. All of our stuff was in unarmored trucks or tracks.)

At this brief, we were shown the Div. plan for the actual breaching of the Iraqi defense lines and fortifications. We were flabbergasted to discover that someone at G-3 thought it would be a good idea of us to pass the minefield breaches directly (about 3-400 meters) behind the lead assault Battalion! Needless to say, this would have put us in our canvas-covered Hummers and converted Chevy Silverado pickups in a precarious position!
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Breaking protocol, our Company commander (a Captain) quietly said (but loudly enough for everyone to hear) "What the F**K? Whose f**king idea is that?" The Major from Division that was giving the breifing immediately stopped talking.
Dead silence.
He recovered nicely, though, with "Well, things are always subject to revision. I'm sure we'll have to change some aspects of it once we get on the ground."

When we finally drove through the minefield lanes, we were safely about 2km back from the lead tanks.

Bearcat99
01-30-2007, 01:45 PM
Originally posted by Eagle_361st:
Could not have been better put than that. We serve our country, not it's politics.

Where the h@ll ya been stranger!!! Good to see ya online again. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

http://www.skyhawk.org/3e/va22/va22a.jpg

Fighting Redcocks

FoolTrottel
01-30-2007, 01:46 PM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:
Any other vets care to step forward or share some of their stories, maybe some of the lighter side of things?
Note: On the very very very light side.
Have not been much of a soldier, so can hardly be called a vet

From July 1983 to August 1984 I was a soldier.
In the Dutch army.
Not that I wanted to, just because I had to...
'Dienstplicht' still existed then.

Two months of learning how to drive
Two months of learning how to be a 'medic'
Ten months of being a Land Rover Ambulance driver, 'being ready' for whatever...
http://www.4wdonline.com/Mil/Marshall/PiCs37/S2AambRQ.jpg
Stationed 5km's away from my home, so I got to get to sleep in my own bed each and every night.

Well, apart from the times on 'exercise', 'manouvers':
* Driving through Germany somewhere, w/o radio or map (tactical situation for us was way too near to the front, us and our equipment might fall into enemy hands http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif) and so, I kept getting lost...

* One night, I had to pretend I was the enemy, my ambulance being used as a troop transport, 6 or so soldiers in it... stationed at the edge of a forest, overlooking a field... well, it was dark, nothing to see...

The enemy was expected to close in across the field, towards us.
I was told to flash the headlights as soon as we saw them... as to mimmick 'firing'

So, we waited. Time passed by... nothing happend, all was quiet.

Well, up and untill I made a small mistake... I dropped something, picked it up from the floor of the car, and somehow accidentally hit the headlight-switch http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif I sent some nice big flashes accross the field.

The Sergeant in the passenger seat starts yelling and cursing and calling me names for messing up...
Next thing: all across the field all he11 broke loose! Lights flashing everywhere! And close!
So, sarge quickly ordered all our troops out of the ambulance... and I start firing... flash flash flash... and could not stop laughing in the meantime...http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Appearently, had I not flashed the ligths by accident, them enemy troops would've caught us completely unnoticed! I saved the day!(okay, 'night')

Serious things that I saw during those 14 months (I can only think of two)
- Driving a guy with a crushed thumb about 100km's to a military hospital, where a civilian one was 1km's away... not my choice, but that's the way it was supposed to go... (this was the one and only time I got to transport a wounded person in all them 14 months...)

- Some time in 1984 we had go to Woensdrecht, a base where some big weapons were stored or were to be stored... there was to be a demonstration against them being there, or them getting there.

And we had to guard the base... me, more a civilian than a soldier... weird... with me gun... guarding that base... weird feeling... no speaking to the ppl demonstrating around the base... but with eye contact... weird...

Monterey13
01-30-2007, 05:48 PM
Not much to say...
Desert Shield/Desert Storm...
My index finger pushes a button 57 times...
57 Tomahawks wreak havoc on their targets.

We launched 285 in all I think.

Monterey13
01-30-2007, 05:52 PM
I can hear the Army guys now...lol
"pushbutton sailor"

I did 3 years in the US Army as a 13b, Field artillery cannon crewman on 8-inch and 155 howitzers(self-propelled).

Wanted a better job where I could use my skills once I got out, and the Army said no, they had already spent the money to train me for 13b.

I didn't reenlist, instead I joined the US Navy, and went into the advanced electronics field as a missile fire controlman.

timholt
01-30-2007, 06:46 PM
Royal Australian Navy 1963 - 1983.
Vietnam 1967-1968 and 1970 to 1972 on the Vung Tau ferry (HMAS Sydney)

WWSensei
01-30-2007, 07:17 PM
War story time? OK, you've been warned. This is a repeat for some of you. It's how I got my callsign...

Some of these contain some "adult" material so proceed with caution.

This is a tale of me and 3 compatriots as we finish up training and head out into the Big world of The Air Force. You've been warned.

OK, so me, Krusty, Beeno, and Fucarwee are almost through training. We know we know our next assignments so a lot of pressure is off. We head out to do what young men do when they have good news--we go get drunk and try to woo women. Well, they do because they are single. I already have the ball and chain at this point. Anyhow, we head down a dive of a watering hole and proceed to get plastered. I take it easy because I'm supposed to be the designated driver.

Now, I'm not sure why, but at some point we decided it would be fun to go outside this establishment and have a boxing match. To this day I can't remember who thought it was a good idea but we did it anyway. Well, four drunks fighting isn't very pretty. I ended up with one helluva a shiner. I got it trying to stop Beeno and Krusty and caught a stray right hook.

By the time we finished is was after 0200 and we went back in for a nightcap. Right after we went back in these two women walk in. I use the term "women" loosely. I mean, there is ugly, butt ugly, coyote ugly and then somewhere way down the line are the really ugly people that spawned these she-demons.

Well, Krusty, not being the choosy sort picks one up and heads out, ignoring my speech about needing to be on base by 0800 tomorrow. Beeno hits on the other one and they head out together. Fucarwee is slumped over in his chair and I am sobered up by this point but blind in one eye since it is swollen shut.

I pour Fucarwee into the passenger seat and I start driving back to base. Well the eye is hurting bad so I am pressing on it with my left hand and trying to stay on the road. After about 20 minutes Fucarwee wakes up and says his usual, "Where the f___ are we?" This is a good spot to explain his callsign. See, he earned this callsign because for being one great pilot the man couldn't navigate worth a damn. He was forever coming over the radio asking "Where the f___ are we?". You would look over at his AC and see him fiddling with his kneeboard and sectionals trying to find landmarks...

Anyhow, we get back to base safely and I crash only to wake up 45 minutes late for class. Fucarwee is sleeping on my floor. We scramble for the classroom, but we are met by the Major outside the door. He orders us to his office pronto.

So, we are standing in the Major's office and he is yelling questions at us about where we were last night and where the hell was Krusty and Beeno. About this time Krusty walks in....still wearing the same clothes only now he is even drunker.

The Major is still yelling at us as Krusty is trying to tell the story of what happened last night. Now imagine a really irate Major yelling at me and behind him is one looped Lt tapping his shoulder and saying this story.

"Major, major, lisssen up. Last night I picked up this cow...really big heifer and went back to her trailer. Well, we was doing it and I was behind her, you know...hey, Major you lissenin'...OK, I was doin' it from behind when her dog comes up behind me and licks me right on the ***. It was wild, I blew it right then and there. It was the best I ever had. Woohooo!"

It took about 10 seconds for Krusty's words to sink into the Major's brain. He just stopped and stared at Krusty in total disbelief. "YOU....DID....WHA!?"

***arwee and I are really trying hard not to laugh and are visibly shaking even though we are trying to stay at attention.

Just then the Major's admin chimed in on the speaker phone and said the
Major had an urgent call. "Put them on!", he yelled at the 702. Bear in mind Fucarwee and I are still at attention or at least the best we can
muster.

"Hey, Major...this is Beeno." The Major yells, "Beeno!?, where the hell are you?"

"Well, Major, see its like this. I don't know. I'm in some trailer park somewhere in Mississippi with a girl who's only got one clean nipple and I'm looking for a ride."

The Major just sank down to his seat and cradled his head in his hands. A few choice words about us getting out and nevering seeing him again was all we heard. He said if we so much as whispered a word of this to anybody or even dropped a pencil in class we would never fly in his Air Force. Our story was to be that the four of us got into a fight and due to my martial arts background I ended up beating the other three so that they were late. How I was to explain being the only one with any visual damage was my problem. I was given the callsign "Sensei" for "teaching the other guys a lesson" by the rest of the class.

Beeno got back that afternoon. I don't know how they found him. He didn't remember anything about the previous night or the morning. His first memory was waking up in the cab on the way back to base. Helluva a ride since I had to loan him the $125 cab fair.

Fucarwee ended up marrying some local girl. Next story will be about how she unintentionally ended up becoming a licensed prostitute on a honeymoon trip to Mexico...

Bremspropeller
01-30-2007, 09:22 PM
My story's rather short:

Got drafted in July '05 and "retired" in April '06 (9 months in total).
Needles to say I served among the Luftwaffe.
I had a great time.
http://www.ubisoft.de/smileys/plane.gif


I sent in an application for a flight-officer career (of course I was aiming for a jet/ frontseat assignment..), but I was pwned by paperwork.
Therefore my time was over before they invited me to the officer-aspirant recruitment tests.

So now I'm studying aeronautical engineering.
I got at least three years of time left before the age-limit for pilot-applicants would kick me out of any chance.
I'm currently thinking over it almost eevery day.

I have recognized there are some active and alumni military pilots in here.
I wonder what they'd advise me to do - especially in a time when "leaders" are replaced by "managers" (a popular saying during my time..).

Choctaw111
02-02-2007, 04:20 AM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:
I could not sleep very well last night (which is the norm) so I thought I would share a little this morning. The Balkans, or more specifically, Kosovo was not a very nice place. It has some of the most beautiful scenery I have ever seen in the world( or at least Europe), with the exception of Germany/Austria, but the people there are in a civil war and many horrible things happen as a result. When you look at the Albanians and the Serbians they look virtually the same with some subtle differences that you get to recognize after you have been there for a while. The Albanians were intent on killing every last Serbian if they could and there I was caught in the middle of it trying to stop it all. There were times where I felt so helpless to do anything at all and wondered why I was even there. There was a small village where I would patrol on a very regular basis and got to know many of the children and families there. It was one of the towns where both Albanians and Serbians were "coexisting" so there was a lot of tension there which is why we were always patrolling that village. After just having been there earlier that day I took my squad back to our small base (we had been on patrol since 0300 and got back around 1300). We got our weapons and equipment cleaned up and ready to go for our next patrol at midnight. Just as I was getting ready to lay down for some rest at 2100 someone came bursting into the SEAhut and yelled that I had to get my squad ready. Since I was QRF (Quick Reaction Force) we had to be ready to go in 5 minutes notice at any time. I am really tired but that is part of the job. I quickly ran down the other end of the SEAhut and informed the rest of the squad and 5 minutes later we are running to the helipad and climbing on board the Blackhawks that are already running and waiting for us. As we are enroute to the village we are thrown boxes of surgical gloves and were told this was a bad one. A few short minutes later we landed about 1/4 mile from the scene and we ran as fast as we could tactically in a Ranger File towards the reported location of the attack. As we approached I could hear the screams and then I could see a large crowd of people who were around their fallen loved ones. I have never seen so much chaos in my life. We had to fight our way through the crowd to get the those that were hit. Here it was a grenade attack by the Albanians on the Serbians. We already had 1 team of soldiers who were in the center of the crowd trying to help so we pushed the crowd back to give these 3 men some room. At that point I realized how bad this was. The first thing I saw was a man with the bottom of his body almost completely gone and a river of blood running into an open sewer and several other people lying on the ground bleeding out. I have never seen so much blood in my life. If I have gone into too much detail I am sorry. This bothers me every day of my life and this is my chance to vent a little bit. It is not like this is a Barbie Doll forum. This is a War sim forum. After our Ambulance HMMWVs arrived and took the casualties away my squad (lucky us) was chosen to stay there all night and secure the area until the NATO brass could come out the see the area. We were so exhausted. I came up with a rest plan. There was a small patch of grass just big enough for a grown man to lie down on, right next to the open sewer. So each man got one hour to lie down that night. It was nice to take a load off but I couldn't sleep. Was another grenade going to be thrown at us? Were we going to be attacked? We didn't know. All we could do was wait till morning. When the sun started to rise these crow like birds started flying in and eating the pieces that were blown off the people! This horrified me and we were constantly chasing them away. Finally NATO Brass showed up (because it was daylight now and therefore "safe") and news crews and everything else and we were finally relieved and got back to base around 1300. There are several more elements to this event but are too difficult to talk about. I hope I don't get into trouble for posting this.
Here a pic of that street with the small patch of grass that we tried to rest on behind the cinder blocks. This was taken several weeks after it happened. You can even see flowers that were placed by the locals there also.

Every time it rains now, and I walk through a puddle, I think about walking through all of the blood that night. It was so thick in the air I could taste it in my mouth. Again I am sorry if I have offended anyone. I just wanted to get this off my chest and share this with the other vets out there. There is so much more I want to say but I am afraid to do it here.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v343/PublicPhotoAccount2/DSC00273-1.jpg

Boandlgramer
02-02-2007, 04:31 AM
Originally posted by AKA_TAGERT:
36H Signal Soldier (29NV10)
1984 - 1988 U.S. Army..... Würzburg Germany

Tagert, you know Hohenfels ?
i was there 2 times( 2 x 10 days in 1985 and 1986) for training ,including 2 days training with US Guys.

Diablo310th
02-02-2007, 06:43 AM
US Army/Ky National Guard. 1stBn/623rd FA. Morgan's Men. 8" SP. Sept. 1976-Oct. 1987. Served as A Btry xo, Srvc. Btry xo, nuke convoy commander, Srvc. btry commander, Bn. s-1, s-2, s-4.

2 uncles...Korea, my dad 3 years US Army Sgt. Armor during Korea. brother...5 years US Navy DD Waddell. My brother was on the Waddell when the sha of iran was being overthrown. His aircraft carrier group was off the shore of Iran and circled by 7 Soviet warships.

Viking-S
02-02-2007, 11:40 AM
What is a thread like this doing here? And why is it not only permitted by the modertators but also encouraged by at least on of them despite the clear forum rules?
I want to ask Bearcat which of the words in the forum rule that he can't understand!

" This topic area is for discussion of topics that relate directly to 1C:Maddox Games. PLEASE REMEMBER TO FOLLOW THE FORUM TERMS OF USE AND FORUM GUIDELINES"

And why, except from your personal political and militarily views, you can accept and permit this abuse of the UBI forum.
Will you be so kind and explain.

Viking

Choctaw111
02-02-2007, 11:42 AM
Originally posted by Boandlgramer:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AKA_TAGERT:
36H Signal Soldier (29NV10)
1984 - 1988 U.S. Army..... Würzburg Germany

Tagert, you know Hohenfels ?
i was there 2 times( 2 x 10 days in 1985 and 1986) for training ,including 2 days training with US Guys. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hohenfels is nice but boy does it get cold at night. I was there with the 1/4 OPFOR. I wore a couple different hats in the Army. I still have one of my Black BDUs from there. Have you ever been over the Knuckles inside a vehicle (M113 modified Russian rig with the 30mm cannon) going full speed? I cracked my tailbone and couldn't lay on my back for 2 weeks after that. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif Man, I loved Germany. I would like to go back a free man and check it out. I got to see a lot of Regensberg where the old Messerschmit factory was and a very nice trip to Munchen and a few other places. I was also up in Hannover and Ehre Lecine a few years before when I was training with the German soldiers. I have some very neat things I traded for when I was up there.

Choctaw111
02-02-2007, 12:01 PM
Originally posted by Viking-S:
What is a thread like this doing here? And why is it not only permitted by the modertators but also encouraged by at least on of them despite the clear forum rules?
I want to ask Bearcat which of the words in the forum rule that he can't understand!

" This topic area is for discussion of topics that relate directly to 1C:Maddox Games. PLEASE REMEMBER TO FOLLOW THE FORUM TERMS OF USE AND FORUM GUIDELINES"

And why, except from your personal political and militarily views, you can accept and permit this abuse of the UBI forum.
Will you be so kind and explain.

Viking

This sim is about honoring our combat vets and experiencing what they went through or don't you agree? This is a thread where our vets can get together and talk about their experiences. If mine are too graphic then ask yourself how many pilots you have killed in the virtual skies and what your virtual bullets may have done to their virtual bodies? Have you ever thought of that? This is a combat game. There are many people in here that the military is just not for them and that is fine. The military is not for everyone but don't bash those who hesitantly share their experiences which are not easy to tell, realizing that many non vets will be reading this thread. I have no problem with non vets reading this thread but please be respectful to those that served. The Armed Forces is not all gravy let me tell you. This is a thread where men (and maybe some women) who have been to war (and even peacetime soldiers) can share their experiences. There are no political views here. Just facts and experiences. I had a job to do and I did it.
You have taken the time to honor a great man (Smedley Butler) and I appreciate your time in doing so but are you a veteran Viking? If you are you have not shared this with us yet that I have seen. Please share with us your military experiences given that you have such a strong opinion of others.

As far as topics that "relate directly to Il2" there are numerous OT topics out there that are not only tolerated but condoned. This thread is much more on topic than any of those and not only honors our vets but is in the highest traditions of honoring those brave men and women who we are "filling the role" in Il2. Once again this is a sim about WAR, and this is a chance for the forum surfers to hear from actual combat vets (even if not from WW2) and maybe make a few supportive comments.

VFA-195 Snacky
02-02-2007, 12:46 PM
Relax http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif


Originally posted by Viking-S:
What is a thread like this doing here? And why is it not only permitted by the modertators but also encouraged by at least on of them despite the clear forum rules?
I want to ask Bearcat which of the words in the forum rule that he can't understand!

" This topic area is for discussion of topics that relate directly to 1C:Maddox Games. PLEASE REMEMBER TO FOLLOW THE FORUM TERMS OF USE AND FORUM GUIDELINES"

And why, except from your personal political and militarily views, you can accept and permit this abuse of the UBI forum.
Will you be so kind and explain.

Viking

mrsiCkstar
02-02-2007, 01:46 PM
I don't consider myself a vet but I did serve briefly in the Finnish Armed Forces as did and will most guys in Finland... Back problems ended it early for me.

But I just wanted to say that I respect the hell out of you guys and as brief as my experience in the Army was I got to experience atleast some of the training you guys have.

they say you go in a punk but you come out a man... maybe I came out a half man? heh.

Anyway, hat's off to all you vets out there! Much respect from me! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

Choctaw111
02-02-2007, 02:07 PM
Here is another view of the same street taken from OP Power, a hill above the village.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v343/PublicPhotoAccount2/bradspics2031-1.jpg

And here is a zoomed in view of the same photo. You can just see the bridge that spans the open sewer at the far end of the street on the left that we rested next to.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v343/PublicPhotoAccount2/bradspics2031-2.jpg

RAF74_Raptor
02-02-2007, 03:13 PM
Viking if you dont like what is written here then by all means dont read it

Have a nice day
BuhBye




Originally posted by Viking-S:
What is a thread like this doing here? And why is it not only permitted by the modertators but also encouraged by at least on of them despite the clear forum rules?
I want to ask Bearcat which of the words in the forum rule that he can't understand!

" This topic area is for discussion of topics that relate directly to 1C:Maddox Games. PLEASE REMEMBER TO FOLLOW THE FORUM TERMS OF USE AND FORUM GUIDELINES"

And why, except from your personal political and militarily views, you can accept and permit this abuse of the UBI forum.
Will you be so kind and explain.

Viking

BM357_Sniper
02-02-2007, 03:42 PM
U.S. Army 1989-2005
Light Infantry Scout
OEF, OIF

I was 17 when I enlisted and 34 when I got out. I'm 35 now, and I'm a multiengine commercial pilot. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a279/lifeguardhall/bunker21.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a279/lifeguardhall/CIMG0013.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a279/lifeguardhall/AmbushPatrol.jpg

Platypus_1.JaVA
02-02-2007, 04:08 PM
Originally posted by Viking-S:
What is a thread like this doing here? And why is it not only permitted by the modertators but also encouraged by at least on of them despite the clear forum rules?
I want to ask Bearcat which of the words in the forum rule that he can't understand!

" This topic area is for discussion of topics that relate directly to 1C:Maddox Games. PLEASE REMEMBER TO FOLLOW THE FORUM TERMS OF USE AND FORUM GUIDELINES"

And why, except from your personal political and militarily views, you can accept and permit this abuse of the UBI forum.
Will you be so kind and explain.

Viking
Ow, that is okay. I think that UBI themselves is violating the rules also. At least they could tell us stuff like why they are taking down forums at random and stuff. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif


And it is not nearly as off-topic as other threads floating in and out.

Platypus_1.JaVA
02-02-2007, 04:12 PM
Originally posted by FoolTrottel:

From July 1983 to August 1984 I was a soldier.
In the Dutch army.
Not that I wanted to, just because I had to...
'Dienstplicht' still existed then.



I can sooooo imagine this story about the flashing lights. I was glad to be one of the very first people who did not have to do 'dienstplicht'. But I keep hearing those great stories and I wonder, might it be worth it for getting in the army?

@Heliopause, my grand-dad was in Semarang, also in the late 40's. He doesn;t talk much about it but I understand that it was a very weird time and place to be. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Weasel53
02-02-2007, 04:13 PM
20 years USAF - Retired
668th Bombardment Squadron, 416th Bombardment Wing, Eighth AF, SAC
328th Bombardment Squadron, 93rd Bombardment Wing, Fifteenth AF, SAC
B-52G over 2000 hours
Navigator

Salute to the vets serving in Iraq and God bless them all!

FoolTrottel
02-02-2007, 04:48 PM
and I wonder, might it be worth it for getting in the army?
The answer is: "No"

As I've left out all the stuff not worth remembering, and I must say, that's been a lot.
Boredom. Boring.

But, in hindsight, that boredom was probably a good thing, as I once was a soldier, but I was very lucky not to have seen any misery...

Monterey13
02-02-2007, 05:59 PM
Choctaw, I, for one, don't mind you sharing your experiences at all. It helps to discuss these things with others. If a certain person doesn't like it, then he doesn't have to click on the topic.

I can relate to your feelings. I never saw any combat-related gore, but a lot from accidents and such.

I have been a firefighter for 9 years now. I have also been a medic with EMS for the last 3 years. I have dealt with more than my share, believe me. After a while, you sort of "harden up" to most of it, because you have to learn to keep a clear head so that you can help and not become a casualty yourself.

It's the kids that stay with me forever. You never forget their faces. I still have some awful dreams now and then. I keep doing it, because of the faces of the ones that I was
able to save. Somebodys' gotta do it.

Choctaw111
02-02-2007, 06:47 PM
Originally posted by Monterey13:
Choctaw, I, for one, don't mind you sharing your experiences at all. It helps to discuss these things with others. If a certain person doesn't like it, then he doesn't have to click on the topic.

I can relate to your feelings. I never saw any combat-related gore, but a lot from accidents and such.

I have been a firefighter for 9 years now. I have also been a medic with EMS for the last 3 years. I have dealt with more than my share, believe me. After a while, you sort of "harden up" to most of it, because you have to learn to keep a clear head so that you can help and not become a casualty yourself.

It's the kids that stay with me forever. You never forget their faces. I still have some awful dreams now and then. I keep doing it, because of the faces of the ones that I was
able to save. Somebodys' gotta do it.

Thank you for your kind words. I have always said that the only ones who have ever seen this kind of thing without combat that may know what it looks like are EMS and similar people. The only real difference is wondering if you would ever wind up like that and the fear and apprehension associated with it. Not so much at the time but afterwards when you have a chance to think about it. That and not having a nice warm bed to go right back to and a relatively nice meal are really the big differences. Just being away from home for so long in such a horrible place takes its toll. There are so many times where I wish I could go back there just to see if all of the kids and families that I "left behind" are still alive and ok. There is not a day that goes by that I am not troubled by this and so many other things. What am I going to do? I have to get back there.

FlatSpinMan
02-02-2007, 11:22 PM
I hadn't read this thread at all until this afternoon. I have absolutely no military experience but it is really interesting reading about what you lads have experienced. I feel great sympathy (NOT pity) for those of you who are still suffering from the experiences you want through and hope that sharing them and knowing that people RESPECT you for doing so will help.
Thanks for posting this stuff. I'll be checking regularly from now on.

Heliopause
02-03-2007, 05:40 AM
@Heliopause, my grand-dad was in Semarang, also in the late 40's. He doesn;t talk much about it but I understand that it was a very weird time and place to be.

The country itself was beautiful but some situation were a bit dangerous. Perhaps you can ask him a couple of questions anyway?


Last year I saw ground to ground rockets getting launched from the airfield in Afganistan were I was and I was thinking "in five minutes or so someone is getting really hurd".

BSS_CUDA
02-03-2007, 08:50 AM
U.S. Navy 1978-1982, Quartermaster 2nd class. ( no in the navy that is not a supply offer, its the Navigator) served U.S.S. Belleau Wood LHA-3, was deployed 1 west-pac cruise from Jan 81 - Sept 81.
Hawaii (Pearl}
Korea (Pohang)
Okinawa (Buckner bay)
Hong Kong
Subic (Philippines)
Singapore
Sri Lanka (Columbo)
Mambasa (Kenya)
Diego Garcia (Indian Ocean)
Fremantle (Australia)
Christ Church (New Zealand)
Phataya Beach (Thailand)


lotta the world to see at 19

this is the last Picture I have of her as they used her as a target ship last July
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/CUDA97045/Belleau%20Wood/bw3-lha3-733386.jpg

in her Prouder days

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v129/CUDA97045/ships/finalvoyage.jpg

I_KG100_Prien
02-03-2007, 11:35 AM
Originally posted by Monterey13:
I have a USS Carl Vinson jacket. Are you a small person? If so, I'd send it to you if you wanted it. It's a bit snug for me.

Here is my ship. I am a Plankowner also.
CG-61 (http://webpages.charter.net/paytons4/paytons4/cg61pic.jpg)

Hey! The USS Monterey! I served aboard her from March 2003 September 2004... Fire Controlman, MK86 GFCS.

Transferred when I cross rated over to Master at Arms.

Good memories from my 17 months aboard her.

BM357_Sniper
02-03-2007, 12:15 PM
Bosnia was fun compared to Iraq and Afghanistan. Seemed boring, blah...

RAF74_Raptor
02-03-2007, 01:15 PM
good to see you again sniper

Choctaw111
02-03-2007, 01:39 PM
Originally posted by BM357_Sniper:
Bosnia was fun compared to Iraq and Afghanistan. Seemed boring, blah...

I don't know if Bosnia and Kosovo are considered to be the same thing. They are close enough in location and I guess pretty much the same things were going on with the ethnic cleansing and all. I for one saw enough of the locals fighting amongst themselves and felt powerless to stop it. We couldn't be everywhere at the same time. I did enjoy going way out into places (out in the Chicken Leg) where the locals said they hadn't seen KFOR in months and speaking with them (through my interpreter). One of the old men (like the Alpha Male) in his small village off of Rt. Tiger way South of Zegra showed me a coin given to him a while back from the 101. It was pretty neat to see. I stayed there for a while with my squad talking to him and the rest of his village was standing around listening in. It felt really good to me to go around to those places that felt forgotten about as they felt like everything was going to be ok. Again I would really like to go back there and see if those people are still there after several years. A part of me is still over there and I just somehow do not feel complete anymore, like I abandoned them when I came home and I feel very guilty about that.

BM357_Sniper
02-03-2007, 01:49 PM
Originally posted by RAF74_Raptor:
good to see you again sniper

Good to see you too! S~

Monterey13
02-03-2007, 04:42 PM
I_KG100_Prien, good to hear from you!

I left her in late 1991, and transferred to SIMA Mayport, test equipment repair. I was the only FC in a shop fulla ET's...eww!!

Had a lot of good times. The only thing I really miss is standing out on the forecastle at night, with the stars, smoking a cigarette, and smelling that air.

BM357_Sniper
02-03-2007, 05:18 PM
Originally posted by BM357_Sniper:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Choctaw111:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by BM357_Sniper:
Bosnia was fun compared to Iraq and Afghanistan. Seemed boring, blah...

I don't know if Bosnia and Kosovo are considered to be the same thing. They are close enough in location and I guess pretty much the same things were going on with the ethnic cleansing and all. I for one saw enough of the locals fighting amongst themselves and felt powerless to stop it. We couldn't be everywhere at the same time. I did enjoy going way out into places (out in the Chicken Leg) where the locals said they hadn't seen KFOR in months and speaking with them (through my interpreter). One of the old men (like the Alpha Male) in his small village off of Rt. Tiger way South of Zegra showed me a coin given to him a while back from the 101. It was pretty neat to see. I stayed there for a while with my squad talking to him and the rest of his village was standing around listening in. It felt really good to me to go around to those places that felt forgotten about as they felt like everything was going to be ok. Again I would really like to go back there and see if those people are still there after several years. A part of me is still over there and I just somehow do not feel complete anymore, like I abandoned them when I came home and I feel very guilty about that. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I meant the Balkans as a whole. It was only a 6 month tour and a long time ago. It would be nice to have a "Veterans" area on the forums to talk. I saw and did way too much to talk about in here during OEF and OIF in the infantry. Along with the normal infantry stories there were a load of hilarious ones, that wern't so funny at the time.

Lemme see if I can tell a quick funny one......While we were waiting in Kuwait to cross the border into Iraq just before the official war started in 03' there were pleanty of scud alerts. During one particular alert my guys followed me to a bunker. We ran in, single file, nut to butt! lol Well, just as we get in I noticed that this wasn't a concrete, but some big plastic container! Someone screamed, "its plastic!" and we all turned around, single file and ran out to the correct bunker. lol After it was over we had a good laugh. That's about the most light hearted story I can think of. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

HotelBushranger
02-04-2007, 06:28 AM
Choctaw mate, you have to go back. I know I can't speak from experience or anything, but I have read other vets experiences (mostly PTO and Vietnam) where going back to the fighting really helped putting demons to rest. I think you should do that as well mate, you even said yourself there's still a part of you there.

Hell I'm sure there are many people on this forum, myself included, that would be willing do donate some money to build up for a ticket to Kosovo.

~S~

Monterey13
02-04-2007, 07:00 AM
I know you feel like you need to help them, but I wouldn't go back. You are a civilian now, and won't be afforded the same protections as you had before. You won't have the backup, technology or the weapons that you had then. If you are single, and really wanted to go back, then going as a merc would be the way to go.

If you have loved ones at home who would miss you if something happened, then your priorities are at home.

I believe it would make you feel better to join a volunteer fire department or become a volunteer EMS first responder. There is a great satisfaction in helping others at their greatest time of need, especially when you know you did it for free, and it wasn't "just doing my job". Heck, even if you just rescue a little girls' puppy from a burning house, the look on her face will be worth every bit of the trouble, believe me. I still have people that walk up and give me hugs and thank me for saving their lives or belongings, or that of a loved one.

I know it can't be exactly the same, but it can help you fill that gap that you have in your heart to help those in need.

Whatever you choose to do, I know you will be successful at it, because you have the right heart.

This world is full of too many people that just don't give a cr@p about anyone else but themselves.

S! my brother.

WWSensei
02-04-2007, 08:08 AM
Choctaw,

Know the feeling brother. Most of my military career had me doing missions in Africa--primarily humantarian relief. I had the "pleasure" of being one of the first volunteer forces to Goma, Zaire while the UN and the rest of the world pissed around while people died.

After I got out of the military in 95 I ended joining a group initially as part of the Peace Corps and then later we were part of USAID and I spent nearly all of 1996 and 1997 all over sub-Saharan Africa. A big part was because, like you, I felt a bit guilty about leaving when there was still so much to do.

I had a family to think of and eventually had to re-priortize my life but there is a big part of me that still in a number of little villages scattered all over the West and Central Africa.

You can't fix all the world's problems my friend. Hell, we can't even fix all of our own, but you did what you could. Takes a long time tor ealize that and some days even I don't buy it, but there it is.

Choctaw111
02-07-2007, 05:43 PM
Do any other vets have something they would like to share? Please no politics. Just actual stories from soldiers. I have had quite an interesting career and will tell about it one piece at a time. That next piece will be later when I have more time.

Targ
02-07-2007, 07:44 PM
1984-1990
B co,3rd btn 17th INF
FT. Ord, CA
11 bravo

TSmoke
02-07-2007, 07:55 PM
Canadian Forces 1975-1982 Released hearing loss.

1st Field Ambulance CFB. Petewawa

3RCHA (Artillery) CFB. Shilo

Esel1964
02-07-2007, 08:21 PM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:
Do any other vets have something they would like to share? Please no politics. Just actual stories from soldiers. I have had quite an interesting career and will tell about it one piece at a time. That next piece will be later when I have more time.

Can't wait to hear the stories,Choctaw! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Treetop64
02-07-2007, 09:24 PM
U.S. Coast Guard from 1995 to 2000. First served on the 210' cutter Courageous based in Panama City, Florida. Then I joined aviation and flew as a radioman/navigator/avionicsman in the venerable HC-130 out of Sacramento, California.

Enforcement missions were long. 9-12 hours patrol. But it was satisfying to plot the course on the charts the day before the mission, then input the numbers into the INS, then have the aircraft actually fly itself along the course you entered. Once free of ATC, the pilots intervened only if we needed to deviate from our plotted course.

Folks really appreciated what we did. On more than one occasion did we fly search missions, making radio call-outs every fifteen minutes or so, only to have the persons we're looking for very gratefully call back and say they're OK. Of course, there were times were we never got the call back...

Everyone was exceptionally well-treated. All of the NCOs were on a first name basis with their peers. Though SaR duty was somewhat frequent (1-in-4), we always got the following day off. If we had to get roused for a SaR mission, then we were given the following day off on our return. Only duty personnel worked weekends.

Most everyone was very proud of what they did, myself included. Of course, we had our fair share of grumpy old men in the hangar. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

That was the coolest job I'll ever have. Looking back, I now hate that I ever got out. Sometimes I still see the very same aircraft flying overhead that I once served aboard, and I actually feel a bit of longing.

Can't say I miss those "dee-licious" boxed lunches, though. Those who've experienced 'em know what I'm talking about...

http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/8024/hc130ex7.png

MrMojok
02-07-2007, 10:18 PM
I was in a USMC Tow Missile company attached to 2nd Tank Bn, 2nd MarDiv during the first Gulf War. Other than a couple of tense moments, absolutely nothing happened at all. Every single Iraqi soldier I saw during the war had his hands up.

I was pretty pissed there was no "action" at the time(I was 22) but as I have grown older and wiser I thank God every day that it worked out the way it did.

There were a couple of very amusing/bizarre/surreal moments over there, and I will write them in here soon.

Choctaw111
02-08-2007, 05:32 AM
Originally posted by MrMojok:
I was in a USMC Tow Missile company attached to 2nd Tank Bn, 2nd MarDiv during the first Gulf War. Other than a couple of tense moments, absolutely nothing happened at all. Every single Iraqi soldier I saw during the war had his hands up.

I was pretty pissed there was no "action" at the time(I was 22) but as I have grown older and wiser I thank God every day that it worked out the way it did.

There were a couple of very amusing/bizarre/surreal moments over there, and I will write them in here soon.

Hey, I was a TOW gunner for a while. In the Army it is 11Hotel. There may be those of you knowledgeable out there that knows what TOW stands for. What you may not know is that when you are a TOW gunner you most often have it mounted on a vehicle (and can dismount it when necessary) and therefore ride in the vehicle with the TOW so we as TOW missile gunners refer to TOW as Tired OF Walking http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif. Just some military humor I thought I would throw in here. I have a neat shirt with a TOW and MGS sitting underneath it on the left chest and on the back real big it shows a T72 in the crosshairs and says "TOW2 DEATH BY WIRE". I have not seen that shirt in a while. I will have to dig that one back out again.

Target identified and engageable. BACKBLAST AREA CLEAR!!!

M2morris
02-08-2007, 06:40 AM
I have come across that wire on the ground a couple of times as a grunt, and I have seen them fire, but another story; my brother flew AH-1 Cobras in the 80s, said he fired a TOW while at a range once and the missile malfunctioned dove into the ground, went up and turned strait back at his AC and flew right over the roter blades missing by a few feet and hitting the ground. I've always wondered if that story involves operator-malfunction, but is missing that part.

MrMojok
02-08-2007, 08:45 AM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:
I have a neat shirt with a TOW and MGS sitting underneath it on the left chest and on the back real big it shows a T72 in the crosshairs and says "TOW2 DEATH BY WIRE". I have not seen that shirt in a while. I will have to dig that one back out again.

Our unit had shirts like that too!

Luv_Muffin
02-10-2007, 08:52 PM
Originally posted by TSmoke:
Canadian Forces 1975-1982 Released hearing loss.

1st Field Ambulance CFB. Petewawa

3RCHA (Artillery) CFB. Shilo

Hehe. Shilo, know it well.

Canadian Armed Forces, Infantry.
Served overseas in the FRY.
Got a cane, rarely use it (ppl look at me)
Got my veterans plates, ppl ask my wife 'how old is your husband, anyway? (hehe)

Was asked by my wife's supervisor "what happened?", why was I holding my cane as I waited to pick her up from the facility she nurses at. I said, "An old war injury." She grinned and said, "Wow. How cool! You actually can say that, and mean it!" I winced and said, "Well, yeah. But people have to shoot at you first, so that takes the shine off of it just a little."

Worf101
02-10-2007, 10:25 PM
Funniest thing I ever "witnessed" was at Camp Castle Korea. Home of the 2nd Engineer Bn. "Go Duece" 2EyeDeee. Front gate duty was handles by our South Korean Brethren. Much respect for some Korean Units, but not these jokers. They were notorious for "letting things leave the compound". It was the 70's, Korea wasn't the economic juggernaut it is now. Still recovering from the Korean War. As a result the locals would collect our garbarge and comb through it.

One day a garbage truck was headed out the gate and got cut short by a Kimchee Kab. After it stopped abruptly a loud "sproing" was heard. Some G.I's looked in the rear only to discover an antenna sticking out of the pile of garbage, where one shouldn't be. Some jokers had managed to push a jeep into the back of the truck and cover it with garbage. Lord knows how many other things had walked out the same way. Needless to say we started doing our own garbage haulin' after that..

Da Worfster

MJDYKAS
02-10-2007, 10:56 PM
USMC 1973 - 1979 Engine Mech on CH-53D sea stallions
USANG 156th FA 1980 to 86 Gunner Towed 155MM

I'd rather be a airwinger !!!!

Ishmael932
02-10-2007, 11:37 PM
Third-generation seafaring man. Grandfather was a merchant seaman who went to sea on square-riggers in the early 1900's. Father a merchant seaman all through WW2 & saw action in North Africa, Sicily, Italy, Alaska & the Pacific. Myself, 6 years as STG from 1972-78. Specialty was Underwater Battery Fire Control & Harpoon installation. Spent 60 days on the Gun line when peace broke out. Hunted the great steel Whales for six years & found 7 confirmed Soviet subs(2 Foxtrot, 2 Echo IIs, 2 Novembers & 1 Yankee SSBN). Semi-circumnavigated the globe in both directions. One way aboard USS Schofield(DEG-3), the other way aboard USS Elmer Montgomery(FF-1082). Was part of the VRB lawsuit against the Navy for a bonus they promised me.

As a result of that, I was in Guantanamo in 78 when the captain of the Montgomery calls me to his stateroom for the ship-over lecture and told me if I reenlisted, they would pay me a bonus of $10,000. I replied,
"That's very nice captain, but if I do sign this paper,...Will I have to sue you guys for this bonus too?" My ships pics below, The box launcher forward, the ASROC, was my launcher:

http://img101.imageshack.us/img101/6392/deg35ez.jpg

http://img186.imageshack.us/img186/9669/ff10826wq.jpg

JV-44
02-11-2007, 12:01 AM
USMC
1985-Present
MarDet USS New Jersey
3rd Tanks, TOW Co
FAST Co / MCSF Co Rodman Panama
1st LAI
3/6
ITB East
2/2
3/2
4th MEB
2D LAR
AT Bn
"Just Cause"
"Promote Liberty"
"Desert Shield / Storm"
OIF 1,2A,3A
OEF
0306 (Marine Gunner)

BM357_Sniper
02-11-2007, 01:41 PM
At work, feel like a story....

Back in late 03' my infantry batallion was securing everything around Balad, Iraq. We were doing all types of combat patrols; raids, ambushes, checkpoints and recons. I was in our batallion reconnassaince platoon, otherwise known as "infantry scout platoon." We had been split up to support the other infantry companies. During one particular night I had my team out on an ambush/overwatch. There was a curfue and anything we saw not in an allied uniform and had a weapon was fair game.

Earlier in the day, my best friend and platoon sgt had been hit with a mortar. He was ok, but some of the others around him weren't. One of the guys had one femur snapped in two and his other leg was lost. Another had most of his face ripped to shreads with glass and shrapnel. We normally went through two to three mortar and rocket attacks a day.

So, around 1am we're sitting outside the perimeter in our hide just trying to stay warm and awake. Yeah, it gets cold in Iraq. Then we saw a flash and heard the explosion of a mortar round, then another and another. They were walking the rounds from outside the perimeter to inside the base. For no reason other than luck we saw the flash of the mortar tube in the distance. By this stage of the war the normal army politics were coming into play and we had to call in before firing if we were not in immediate danger. So I had one of my guys call in that I had a shot with my M24 SWS. It was close to 1000 meters, but I thought I could at least scare them enough to stop firing. The base TOC called back and said not to fire, they were sending a QRF out, from another, new unit that was just in country. The rounds kept coming in, they were on their 6th one and getting closer to the living quaters on base. I started firing. It was absolutely ridiculous that they were playing the glory game. I took 3 shots. I had a PVS10 day/night scope on the rifle and all I could see in the distance was the flash of the tube and some barely visible sillioutes. The mortor stopped firing and it was quite for the rest of the night.

Oh yeah, 45 minutes later the QRF showed up and found the mortar tube with a few rounds laying next to it. The base at this time was being commanded by some COSCOM unit, 5th I believe. Since they are all support and don't have any "combat" role they decided to put together their own QRF made up of office junkies that had no idea what they were doing. It's a good thing they never had to.

I thought I'd add these....
http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a279/lifeguardhall/bunker21.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a279/lifeguardhall/CIMG0013.jpg

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a279/lifeguardhall/AmbushPatrol.jpg

striker-85
02-11-2007, 05:55 PM
1985 - 1989 US Air Force, Falcon AFS (called something else now) - Worked on the GPS system.

1989 - 1996 Colorado Air National Guard & California Air National Guard.

BSS_CUDA
02-11-2007, 06:08 PM
ok ya talked me into it.

one day while on duty aboard ship I had a roving patrol, walking about the ship looking for unwanteds, mind you I'm 6'6" so I'm not a small man. I had gotten into the habit of when ever the leg came up to go through a hatch the head came down, been doing that for 2+ years at the time. well while on the roving patrol I had to check out the port side aft gun turret. well to get to the turret you had to go down a set of 3 stairs ( not a ladder in this case ) well when I reached the hatch the knee came up the head went down and BAMMO out for the count. I didn't take into account I was stepping off a stair in stead of stepping up to go through the hatch http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif
woke up a few minutes later with a bloody forehead

BSS_CUDA
02-11-2007, 06:15 PM
another story I have,

while at sea we were in the process of an Unrep (underway replenishment ) with an FFG we were refueling them so we were guide ship. my job during this time was helmsman I was driving my ship, now mind you this was no tiny thing, were talking 900ft of amphib aircraft carrier. well here we are steaming alongside the FFG 150 ft apart. when all the sudden I hear a ships whistle and my Conn officer is screaming Right full rudder. so I whip the rudder rt full and respond rt full rudder aye sir. thinking to my self WTF thats going to take us right into the FFG, now we'll have a collision board of inquiry the whole nine yards because I'm behind the wheel. well I found out after the fact that some dumbarse on the FFG decided to bleed out a hydraulic fluctuation in the steering gears while in the middle of the Unrep which caused their rudders to shift to the left and lock. in the ensuing mess we managed to pass less than 10 ft infront of the FFG. if we hadn't gone rt full rudder and swung our stern to the left we would have collided. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Ishmael932
02-11-2007, 09:28 PM
Here's one from me.

In mid-June, 1976, I deployed to the Med aboard USS Elmer Montgomery. When everyone else went to New York for the Bicentennial, we went on watch. We were welcomed to the Med by a soviet AGI outside Rota who welcomed us to the Med, told us who we were relieving and did all this on a radio net cleared for classified traffic. It was their way of counting coup on us.

Once we entered the Med, the Russians assigned a Foxtrot SS as our shadow. This was at the beginning of the passive revolution and we got to try out our new AN-SQR-17 sonobuoy processor. Everytime we picked up a contact, we would vector the helo out to drop buoys and the same engine noise signature would turn up from our shadow. So after about 2 months of this, I got permission to come up over Gertrude, the underwate telephone to send them a message. The message was part of an old Firesign Theatre record called,"Don't Crush That Dwarf! Hand ME The Pliers!" The section I played was a takeoff off the old Andy Hardy movies featuring the conflict between Morse Science High & Communist Martyr's High.

Cut to 1999. I was living in Pasadena, Ca. & had taken my daughter to Burbank airport for her flight back to Oakland when my car broke down about a mile from the airport. I put her in a cab & called the tow service. The tow truck showed up and the driver, an Armenian guy, hooks me up and starts to tow me home. We start talking about the Navy as he had seen my Schofield ball cap and told me that he'd served aboard a Foxtrot SS. I told him my story about our Med deployment and out of the blue he asked,

"Were you on the Montgomery?"

It turns out he served on the boat we had tracked all over the Med. He said he really hated when we locked on to them because 240 kilowatts of acoustic power banging off their hull caused a lot of sleepless nights. They had just bought a Foxtrot SS called the Scorpion and had opened her up for visits in Long Beach by the Queen Mary. I asked if he ever went down there for old times sake. He said,"Hell No! I lived that **** for three years."

When we got home, I gave him my copy of "Blind Man's Bluff" and he gave me his soviet sub enlisted man's pin.

redfeathers1948
02-11-2007, 09:57 PM
U.S.Navy 1966-1970
1 year bootcamp and Parachute Rigger A school
NAS Lakehurst New Jersey.
2 years HC-7;Det110 Atsugi Japan,Cubi Pt.
Phillipins,90 days Yankee Station crossdecked
USS Enterprise, USS Benington,USS Kittyhawk,
USS Yorktown, USS America.
1 year Nas Mirimar VFP-63 F8 Crusader Reconisance Aircraft
A rigger I knew from A school dropped in to our loft at Cubi point and asked me if I would pack his chutes for him as he wanted to hit the beach before he had to go back out. I had the duty that night so no sweat. A year later he looked me up at Miramar and told me that one of the chutes an NB11 I think it was had been used on a catshot mishap and worked of course. He was miffed as he was a lifer and I couldnt get out fast enough. Further back then one had to do a ripchord pull jump from a C-47 at 3000 feet to graduate from A school. So I did my job and did my time and am glad for it.

TopGunBkk
02-12-2007, 01:21 AM
Gulf War...stealh pilot now retired after 2004.

ViktorViktor
02-12-2007, 05:57 AM
hmmmmm. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

sukebeboy
02-12-2007, 06:08 AM
Canadian Armed Forces, 2nd C.E.R. '91-'94
'91 UNFICYP - Cyprus, attached to PPCLI
'93 UNPROFOR - Fmr Yugoslavia, attached to PPCLI

joeap
02-12-2007, 06:09 AM
Originally posted by ViktorViktor:
hmmmmm. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif What is this in reference too?

Choctaw111
02-12-2007, 11:46 AM
Originally posted by joeap:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ViktorViktor:
hmmmmm. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif What is this in reference too? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think he is referring to TopGunBkk and horrible things he has been posting in other threads. He has been permanently banned. I find it hard to believe that he is even a veteran at all with some of the things that he typed. They were very cruel and childish. He says he lives in Bancok, Thailand and from his post here did at least 20 years in the Air Force. Look up his recent posts and make a determination for yourself. I surely hope that there are no posers in this thread. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

BM357_Sniper
02-12-2007, 12:27 PM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by joeap:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ViktorViktor:
hmmmmm. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif What is this in reference too? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think he is referring to TopGunBkk and horrible things he has been posting in other threads. He has been permanently banned. I find it hard to believe that he is even a veteran at all with some of the things that he typed. They were very cruel and childish. He says he lives in Bancok, Thailand and from his post here did at least 20 years in the Air Force. Look up his recent posts and make a determination for yourself. I surely hope that there are no posers in this thread. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

After reading his posts, seeing how bad his grammer and general punctuation and english is, not to mention his demeaner, he's not educated enough to be a pilot and was never in the military as one. Just ignore topgun, he's a poser.

M2morris
02-12-2007, 12:46 PM
Originally posted by BM357_Sniper:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Choctaw111:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by joeap:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by ViktorViktor:
hmmmmm. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif What is this in reference too? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

I think he is referring to TopGunBkk and horrible things he has been posting in other threads. He has been permanently banned. I find it hard to believe that he is even a veteran at all with some of the things that he typed. They were very cruel and childish. He says he lives in Bancok, Thailand and from his post here did at least 20 years in the Air Force. Look up his recent posts and make a determination for yourself. I surely hope that there are no posers in this thread. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

After reading his posts, seeing how bad his grammer and general punctuation and english is, not to mention his demeaner, he's not educated enough to be a pilot and was never in the military as one. Just ignore topgun, he's a poser. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Here is something for TopGunBkk:
http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b206/planegeek/noBS.jpg

Choctaw111
02-12-2007, 01:01 PM
A very good friend, and my medic during the Kosovo Campaign just passed away. This is what I typed in another thread as I was hoping it would get more attention there.

I thought I would share this outside of the veterans thread. He passed away peacefully in the VA hospice Friday evening after a long battle with brain cancer. He was only 27 with a wife and two sons. He was a good man and had my highest respect. Please keep his family in your thoughts and prayers. There was a very nice write up in the paper about him stating how he kept Serbian civilians alive after a grenade attack until they could be airlifted off the battlefield. I was personally with him when this happened (mentioned in the veterans thread) and it is things like this that draw soldiers close to one another. A lifelong bond that cannot be explained. I have been dreading the day to find out this terrible news but he is in no pain now. May God rest his soul. I salute him and will miss him more than words can say.

MEGILE
02-12-2007, 01:19 PM
Originally posted by M2morris:
U.S Army Veteran
March 1986


Best month in history of the world

The birth of megile

jurinko
02-12-2007, 02:27 PM
My father was a commander of T-34 in late fifties in Czechoslovak People´s Army.

When I reached military age in 1992, the military service was still obligatory here. Being no peacenik asking for civilian service instead, I applied for paratroopers to get some real stuff. However, I was not accepted because of my right eye -1,5d not only for paras, but for normal army as well. Military stuff still fascinates me, I do sports and have fun training to be able to pass PT limits for various armies (the limits found on the net like push-ups, running, sit-ups). S! to all veterans!

HerrGraf
02-12-2007, 09:27 PM
I suppose if someone is suspected of being a wantabee (poser), we could ask him to post a copy of his DD214.

NHawk52
02-13-2007, 12:39 AM
US Army '71 - '81
SSG E-6

'72 - '74 -- 9th Div Field Artillery, 155mm sp's and 105mm towed's, FDC and Recon Sgt, Ft. Lewis, WA

'74 - '75 -- 9th MP Co, 9th Div. - Patrol, Desk Sgt, and Ops, Ft. Lewis, WA

'75 - '78 -- 556th MP Co, 59th Ord Bde (Tower Rats) - Nuclear Surety Program, security, and Ops. Siegelsbach (Heilbronn), Germany

'78 - '79 -- 296th MP Co, FORSCOM, Desk Sgt and Ops, Ft. Lewis, WA

'80 - '81 -- USAR, MP Ops, Ft. Lawton (Seattle), WA


My dad was a SGT/E-5 stationed at Hobbs Army Air Field, New Mexico (a training base for B-17's) thru the mid to late '40s.

SeaFireLIV
02-13-2007, 03:37 AM
I`ve never been in the Forces, but I just wanted to give a Salute ! to you you guys who went there for us. You have my respect.


Not much else I can say.

GH_Klingstroem
02-13-2007, 05:18 AM
Jeeeses I was in the military for 14 months, and so has almost every single guy I know, since its compulsary here in sweden, or at least supposed to be and that goes for quite a few countries here in europe. I would hardly call myself a veteran or any of my friend only cuz we know how to handle weapons and learned how to kill.
Guys that come back from war and have seen combat or at least have been in a combat zone, THOSE are veterans. Anything else is just ridiculous. Guys pretending to be veterans only because they have done a year or two in the military.... Bah http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-mad.gif
Surely there are veterans in here but c'mon guys am I a veteran only cuz I have learnt how to handle a ak47 and ak5 and spent a over a year in a military uniform, preparing for a war that might never come?

MAILMAN------
02-13-2007, 02:28 PM
US Navy - Enlisted - Boston, MA.

USN 1 Jun 1979 - July 20, 1989

USS Barbel SS-580 Pearl Harbor, HI. EM2(SS)
Basic Enlisted Submrine School, Instructor - SSC Groton, CT. IC1(SS)
USS Greenling SSN-614 New London, CT. IC1(SS)

USNR Dec. 1989 - January 2004

RNMCB-17 (changed to NMCB-17 after Desert Storm) Port Hueneme, CA. IC/CE1(SS)
NCFSU-2 Port Heneme, CA. CE1(SS)
NMCB27 Brunswick NAS, ME. CE1(SS)

Retired USNR January 2004 - Maine

badatit
02-13-2007, 03:48 PM
United States Army
1981-1985
Basic Fort Jackson S.C. (Tank Hill)
Advanced Fort Knox Ky.
Combat Support Company 2/81 1st Armored (RED LIONS) Erlangen, Germany
Recovery Specialist cross-trained as a Cavalry Scout
Finished up in Fort Carson, Co.

Sometimes...I wish I'd stayed in.

huggy87
02-14-2007, 07:52 AM
10 years in the USN. I'm not quite a veteran yet, but I'm getting out soon. All my time has been spent as a hornet pilot, and for the last three years I have been an FRS instructor on the Super Hornet.

One quick sea story...

I was leading a section over northern Iraq during the invasion. On this particular mission we were supporting a prowler, acting as a shield for A/A threats and as a missile multiplier for him. I came off the tanker in Turkey before heading in country with the prowler and I'll be damned if I could get my fuel probe to retract. A hyd malfunction kept the probe locked out. I wasn't about to head back to the ship with three HARM still on my jet so I went in country anyway. Having your probe out limits your airspeed (wouldn't want a part ripping off and heading down your intake), and it has a bright white light at the end of it. I was traipsing over Iraq on a black @ss night, barely able to maneuver, and with a big light on my jet that I'm sure had to be visible from the ground.

The Prowler eventually found some targets for me and my wingman and wanted all five of our missiles fired in addition to his own. I should say that being a harm truck is not the most sought after sortie for a hornet pilot, I would have much rather been dropping LGBs or JDAM. But seeing a harm fire at night made up for any sense of dissapointment I felt about being a harm truck. It's pretty cool! The things light up the sky and go zooming up into the moronosphere. Seeing 5 harm go downrange was an awesome sight. So great in fact, that my nugget wingman was flying after them transfixed. As I watched my a/a tacan build past four miles after turning away it finally occured to me what was happening. I radioed him "Hey, are you coming with me?" We joked about it later, but I swear he would have followed those missiles all the way to the SA-2. He's a top gun instructor now and I still occasionally give him **** about that.

ploughman
02-14-2007, 08:08 AM
Stuff can be so mesmerising. I've never been in the military but did once have a very exciting night cowering in a ditch on account of being within about 1,500m of an exploding ammunition depot. I have to say it was with doubt the most terribly beautiful thing I have ever seen.

Choctaw111
02-14-2007, 08:54 AM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Stuff can be so mesmerising. I've never been in the military but did once have a very exciting night cowering in a ditch on account of being within about 1,500m of an exploding ammunition depot. I have to say it was with doubt the most terribly beautiful thing I have ever seen.

No pun intended but sounds like a blast! When and where was that?

ploughman
02-14-2007, 09:22 AM
Ages ago now, Halloween night 1984, or it might have been '83. It was the Indonesian Marines depot in Cilandak, South Jakarta, Indonesia.

The depot blew up in maybe four or five really big blasts over a period of some hours during the night and it looked like something hollywood would come up with, giant fireballs full of debris and stuff. The rest of the time it spat out rockets and artillery shells so fast you couldn't tell one from another, it was like being under a freight train. Luckily I was only fourteen and was too stupid to be scared so I really enjoyed it. As I said, fantastic to look at, the sky was filled with debris and flares, rockets spinning off and the compression waves of individual explosions over-lapping each other in the humid tropical air.

It was a complete blast. Not sure I'd feel the same about it if it happened to me now though.

A mate of mine showed me a photo a while later of a (probably) 155mm arty shell that came through the wall of his house and destroyed every stick of furniture in the dining room except the dining room table before landing in the centre of the table on the table cloth just like it had been gently placed there. Mental.

edit**** I haven't thought about this a long while and recounting it here made me look on the web to see if there was anything about it out there and low and behold I found these:

http://bmj.mirexsj.com/images/Jakarta_1984_II_small.jpg

http://bmj.mirexsj.com/images/Jakarta_1984_IV_small.jpg

Which is pretty much what I remember seeing.

reisen52
02-14-2007, 09:37 AM
US Army 1963-1969
Basic - Ft Dix, NJ
MOS School - Ft Knox, KY
11th ACR
Sr. Tracked Vehicle Recovery Mechanic.

JarheadEd
02-14-2007, 10:00 AM
USMC
1985-1991
MOS 6337 F/A-18 Hornet Electrician
VMFA-251, VMFA-312, M.C.A.S. Beaufort, South Carolina.

Beautiful Beaufort, by the sea, twenty miles south of Yamasee.

jjohnson24
02-14-2007, 03:40 PM
U.S.M.C.
'66 - '67
Viet Nam - Republic of
MOS: 2531/0831 (Radio man on Arty F.O. team)

I don't see too many of the "few and proud" checking in.
To those who wore/wear the EGA, Semper Fi

wayno7777
02-15-2007, 01:25 AM
Originally posted by badatit:
United States Army
1981-1985
Basic Fort Jackson S.C. (Tank Hill)
Advanced Fort Knox Ky.
Combat Support Company 2/81 1st Armored (RED LIONS) Erlangen, Germany
Recovery Specialist cross-trained as a Cavalry Scout
Finished up in Fort Carson, Co.

Sometimes...I wish I'd stayed in.


I remember Tank Hill.... D-4-1 (9,10-'76)

Choctaw111
02-04-2010, 07:06 PM
I thought I would bring this back and see if we have any new members who are soldiers.

LW_lcarp
02-04-2010, 08:34 PM
U.S.Army 1986-1990 (91)
Basic and AIT FT. Dix NJ
63B10H8
2 years with the Towerrats at Siegelsbach Army Depot with the 556th MP Co.
1 and a half Years with C34th Engineers (Heavy) at Ft. Polk La. (3 month detour in Honduras while with them)
Recalled for ODS in January 91

Choctaw111
02-04-2010, 08:42 PM
Originally posted by LW_lcarp:
U.S.Army 1986-1990 (91)
Basic and AIT FT. Dix NJ
63B10H8
2 years with the Towerrats at Siegelsbach Army Depot with the 556th MP Co.
1 and a half Years with C34th Engineers (Heavy) at Ft. Polk La. (3 month detour in Honduras while with them)
Recalled for ODS in January 91


I am not too fond of Polk.
I was there for JRTC 2003.
At least I was only there once.

Choctaw111
05-19-2010, 06:01 PM
This deserves a heartfelt bump, especially with Memorial Day just around the corner.

BM357_Sniper
05-19-2010, 06:29 PM
I've already posted here, but at the time I had been out for a couple of years. I have since been layed off from the airline and reinlisted. I'm deployed again in Iraq and just wanted to say hello.

M2morris
05-19-2010, 07:55 PM
Originally posted by BM357_Sniper:
I've already posted here, but at the time I had been out for a couple of years. I have since been layed off from the airline and reinlisted. I'm deployed again in Iraq and just wanted to say hello.
Patting you on the back and wishing you luck.
Proud of you. Don't get hurt.

(20 year vet myself.)

Treetop64
05-19-2010, 08:02 PM
USMC from 1989-1993. 0151-Admin "Pogue". Qualified as "Sharpshooter" in boot camp, and shot "Expert" for the remaining three years.

USGC from 1995-2000. Avionics Technician/Radioman/Navigator in HC-130 aircraft (1600 series, now retired) out of Scramento, CA. Loved it, but I only got out so that I can stay and live in California long term.

Choctaw111
05-19-2010, 09:17 PM
Originally posted by BM357_Sniper:
I've already posted here, but at the time I had been out for a couple of years. I have since been layed off from the airline and reinlisted. I'm deployed again in Iraq and just wanted to say hello.

Yes, I remember you rather well, but haven't seen you around here in a while.
There is not too much about the Army life that I miss anymore, but still, if I could, believe me when I say that I would reenlist in a heartbeat.
There is something noble about serving your country in that kind of capacity, and I am so glad and proud to have done it.
You take care over there. I mean that.

sack784
05-20-2010, 10:28 PM
G'day Choctaw111,
I totally agree with what you said in your post. I'm an Australian "Vietnam Vet" (1971). I got "Fragged" and since 1993 have suffered with "PTSD". I normally don't say anything favourable about our Government however I have to say that our "Department of Veterans Affairs" and the legislation which embodies our entitlements are both very good and personally I can't complain. I am what we call "Totally and Permanently Incapacitated". I receive a pension of around $1970.00AUD each fortnight plus all of the other benefits. I have to say that I'm unfamiliar with your entitlements and how much you receive ie how much you receive in the way of a pension. I reckon it's a good idea keeping this thread going and if you wish, send me an e-mail I would like to keep in touch.

Cheers,

sack784
1426hrs AET
Friday 21/05/10. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Choctaw111
05-21-2010, 07:06 AM
@sack784

I receive a 100% disability rating and am also "totally and permanently" disabled, but I got this after going a few rounds with the government.
The amount of veterans disability for 100% is a little than $3,000 USD a month, plus I receive disability from the Social Security administration.
I don't pay taxes on any of it.
I addition, I also pay no property tax.
My hunting and fishing licenses are free of charge and I get numerous other benefits.

bcudagirl
12-09-2014, 01:05 AM
Searching for servicemen that were stationed at Siegelsbach 74-77. Would anyone remember Lonnie Hastings, MP dog handler?

Choctaw111
12-16-2014, 04:37 PM
I haven't stopped by this forum in quite some time and saw that someone bumped this thread and had to check it out.
I hope that all is well with everyone here in this thread.

ctguy19552
05-04-2015, 09:45 AM
My Dad was with the 4/25th on Iwo Jima and my Son was in the 2/11 in Kajaki, Afghanistan.

I was stationed in Schwetzingen, West Germany from 1972 to 1975
as a 72B20 communications specialist.
US Army Stratcom-Eur

http://i968.photobucket.com/albums/ae168/CTguy1955/MilitaryTradition.jpg
http://i968.photobucket.com/albums/ae168/CTguy1955/Lightingofthecastle_zpsd9121a92.jpg