PDA

View Full Version : WWII Ace: calm / ferocious



XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 07:49 AM
This story has been haunting me for months since I reread "God is my Copilot" by Col Robert L. Scott.

Disclaimer: the word "Jap" is repeated in the following excerpt. Personally, I don't use this word and refrain from racial slurs in general. Others can choose otherwise and that's their business. This is one of the freedoms that men like Tex Hill fought to preserve during WWII.

The story:

"One day over Hengyang, after we had broken the Japanese wave with our assault and support and there were some fifteen Zeros burning around among the Pagodas of this Hunan capital, I saw an odd sight down below. There was on lone Jap, doubtless of the suicidal Samurai school, for though his buddies had either been shot down in their attempted stafing attack or had turned for home, this arrogant follower of the Shinto Shrine was strafing the field -- alone. Two of us rolled to go get him, but from the end of the field towards the river I saw a P-40 pull out of a dive and head for the Jap. It was Tex Hill.

As the two fighters drew together in this breath-taking, head-on attack, I saw their tracers meeting and for a second I didn't know whether the ships ran together or both exploded in the air. As the smoke thinned I saw the P-40 flash on through and out into the clear, but the Jap crashed and burned on the field of Hengyang. Hill and the Jap had shot it out nose to nose, and once again I thought of the days of Western gunplay.

We landed and waited for Tex to come over. As we stood around the burning enemy ship, I saw Hill striding across the field from his fighter. Hanging low on his right leg was his army forty-five. Subconsciously I looked at his other leg as if I expected to find the mate hanging there.

Tex's blond hair was blowing in the wind, his eyes were looking with venomous hate at the Jap, his jaw was set. I had opened my mouth to congratulate him, for he had shot down two enemy ships that day, when I had a closer look at his eyes....Tex strode over close to the fire and looked at the mutilated Jap where he had been thrown from the cockpit. Then, without a change of expression, he kicked the largest piece of Jap--the head and one shoulder--into the fire. I heard his slow drawl: "All right, mister--if that's the way you want to fight it's all right with me."

Tex calmly left the group and walked back to his ship and into the alert shed for his cup of tea. None of us said anything. The Chinese coolies who usually yelled "Ding-hao-ding-hao" saw his eyes and the set of his jaw, too--and just waited until later to congratulate him" (pp 132-133).



<center>OC
<img src=http://www.brennt.com/hoppers/images/oldcanuck.jpg></center>


<center>You don't stop playing because you grow old,
you grow old because you stop playing.</center>


Message Edited on 12/14/0306:54AM by Old_Canuck

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 07:49 AM
This story has been haunting me for months since I reread "God is my Copilot" by Col Robert L. Scott.

Disclaimer: the word "Jap" is repeated in the following excerpt. Personally, I don't use this word and refrain from racial slurs in general. Others can choose otherwise and that's their business. This is one of the freedoms that men like Tex Hill fought to preserve during WWII.

The story:

"One day over Hengyang, after we had broken the Japanese wave with our assault and support and there were some fifteen Zeros burning around among the Pagodas of this Hunan capital, I saw an odd sight down below. There was on lone Jap, doubtless of the suicidal Samurai school, for though his buddies had either been shot down in their attempted stafing attack or had turned for home, this arrogant follower of the Shinto Shrine was strafing the field -- alone. Two of us rolled to go get him, but from the end of the field towards the river I saw a P-40 pull out of a dive and head for the Jap. It was Tex Hill.

As the two fighters drew together in this breath-taking, head-on attack, I saw their tracers meeting and for a second I didn't know whether the ships ran together or both exploded in the air. As the smoke thinned I saw the P-40 flash on through and out into the clear, but the Jap crashed and burned on the field of Hengyang. Hill and the Jap had shot it out nose to nose, and once again I thought of the days of Western gunplay.

We landed and waited for Tex to come over. As we stood around the burning enemy ship, I saw Hill striding across the field from his fighter. Hanging low on his right leg was his army forty-five. Subconsciously I looked at his other leg as if I expected to find the mate hanging there.

Tex's blond hair was blowing in the wind, his eyes were looking with venomous hate at the Jap, his jaw was set. I had opened my mouth to congratulate him, for he had shot down two enemy ships that day, when I had a closer look at his eyes....Tex strode over close to the fire and looked at the mutilated Jap where he had been thrown from the cockpit. Then, without a change of expression, he kicked the largest piece of Jap--the head and one shoulder--into the fire. I heard his slow drawl: "All right, mister--if that's the way you want to fight it's all right with me."

Tex calmly left the group and walked back to his ship and into the alert shed for his cup of tea. None of us said anything. The Chinese coolies who usually yelled "Ding-hao-ding-hao" saw his eyes and the set of his jaw, too--and just waited until later to congratulate him" (pp 132-133).



<center>OC
<img src=http://www.brennt.com/hoppers/images/oldcanuck.jpg></center>


<center>You don't stop playing because you grow old,
you grow old because you stop playing.</center>


Message Edited on 12/14/0306:54AM by Old_Canuck

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 08:08 AM
Just raw hatred, what can be said. I've often wondered if I was in the midst of it would I just be doing my duty? There's no judgment here, the enemy is finished. The next day put your arm around the guy, you'll both need it...and get on with it.

Thanks Al

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 08:48 AM
Great story.Although I was surprised to read that Tex whent head to head with the enemy.Although he was sucessful,everything I've read and heard says that going head to head is something you shouldn't do.

Could it be that sheer hatred can cloud one's judgement?
Anyways,just some thoughts.Iliked the wild west reference


Rodger,go with Throttle Up.

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 08:57 AM
His judgement must have been "clouded by hatred" alright. He just got away with it that one time.

<center>OC
<img src=http://www.brennt.com/hoppers/images/oldcanuck.jpg></center>


<center>You don't stop playing because you grow old,
you grow old because you stop playing.</center>

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 09:44 AM
Yeah hatred is an evil thing. My grampa is the same way he fought in the Pacific.

You think thats bad, you should read some of the Vietnam stories. Its the only war where victory was measured by the bodycount of the enemy.

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 05:51 PM
darkhorizon11 wrote:
- Yeah hatred is an evil thing. My grampa is the same
- way he fought in the Pacific.
-
- You think thats bad, you should read some of the
- Vietnam stories. Its the only war where victory was
- measured by the bodycount of the enemy.
-
-

A) its always been that way to a certain amount. WW1 for example

once the allies found out what the japs did to prisoners etc, u hated them also.
oh and u faught to the death, better to die than tobe captured by the japs.


whineingu /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 06:50 PM
I know a person who lived through the Batan Death March.

He respected the Japanese.

Indulging in hatred is a choice, it may be an easy one, but it is none the less a choice.

This post topic was a good read, thanks.





JG14_Josf

XyZspineZyX
12-14-2003, 08:50 PM
This behavior and so-called hatred was certainly borne of the times and circumstances of the day. That does not justify anything...simply an observation. I know in laaaater years Tex Hill and Saburo Sakai met and expressed mutual respect for each other.

Time really does heal (most) all wounds.



http://home.earthlink.net/~aclzkim1/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/il2sig2.jpg