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XyZspineZyX
10-26-2003, 04:54 PM
Just been reading, thought some of you might find it interesting...
(That's a 'u' in P*ssy BTW - I appear to have been censored /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif )
.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

AN INTERESTING POINT ABOUT MUNICH

On arrival at Tangmere I was rather surprised to hear about the flap that had swept through the fighter squadrons during the Munich crisis a few months before. All the 1 Squadron officers had spent a hectic week in the hangers with the aircraftsmen spraying camouflage paint on the brilliant silver aircraft. The troops had belted ammunition day and night. And the CO of 1 Squadron (which was equipped with obsolete Hawker Fury biplanes carrying two slow-firing machine-guns and capable of a top speed of 220 mph) had announced to his startled pilots: "Gentlemen, our aircraft are too slow to catch the German bombers: we must ram them."

Fortunately for the RAF, England and the world, Mr Chamberlain managed to stave off war for a year. That vital year gave the RAF time to re-equip the regular fighter squadrons with Hurricanes and Spitfires armed with eight rapid-firing machine-guns and capable of an average top speed of 320 mph.


.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

FORMATION PRACTICE

Soon we were in our cockpits, most of us in shirtsleeves in the heat. Engine after engine burst into life and was run up by its pilot. The Bull's order came clearly over thre R/T: "Come on, we're off! We're off!" He taxied past, followed by Hilly Brown and Leslie Clisby, who formed his section of three. Then came Johhny Walker,P*ssy Palmer and sergeant soper, the Red Section of "A" Flight, followed by Prosser Hanks, myself and Stratton, the Yellow Section. Next came "B" Flight - Leak Crusoe, Boy Mould, Sergeant Berry (Blue Section), and Billy Drake, Sergeant Clowes and Sergeant Albonico (Green Section).

The fifteen Hurricanes move forward together with a deep roar, slowly at first, then gathering speed. Tails come up, and controls get more feel. Bump-bump-bump. Almost off. A bit frightening, this take off. We fly! No...down we come again. Bump...Blast! Must have been a down-draught...Hold it! We're off now - straight over the cliff edge 400 feet above the sea. I see Prosser shut his eyes in mock terror. It is an odd feeling. As usual, I start to talk to myself. Wheels up. Keep in. Stick between knees. Come on, bloody wheels! Dropping behind a bit. Open your throttle! More! Wide! Ah, there are the two pretty red lights: the wheels are locked up. Now get in closer, for God's sake! The Bull's giving it too much throttle, blast him! Anyway - I'm tucked in now. That's fine.

"Sections astern - Sections astern - Go!" over the R/T from the bull. Back drops my section of three, a little left and underneath. Don't waffle, P*ssy, or I'll chew up your tail! Up we climb. Phew, it's hot! But I'll bet it looks nice. Hope so anyway.

Out we go over the sea. Flying south I think. Yes, there's the far side of the Seinne. "Turning right - turning right a fraction!" from the Bull. Round and out to sea again. Keep below Prosser in the turn - that's right. Hell, the sun's bloody bright! I can't see Prosser's wing when he's above me in the turn. Don't hit him! Watch his tailplane! The Bull again: "Coming out - coming out!" We straighten. Ah, that's better - I can see now. And the Bull once more: "For Number 5 Attack - Deploy - Go! Sections-line-astern - Go! Number 5 Attack - Go!"

Open out a bit. There goes Johnny. Now P*ssy. Soper. Prosser next. Now me. Down I go. Watch "B" Z Flight and synchronize with them. Pull up now. Fire! Break away quickly. Roll right over and down to the right. Rejoin. Where's Prosser got to? Can't see a bloody thing. Ah, there he is, up there. Full throttle! Up - up - cut the corner. Here we come behind him. Throttle back or you'll pass him. And there we are again, back in line-astern.

Prosser's waggling his wings. That means form Vic. "Re-form! - Re-form!" from the Bull. "Turning right now!" Towards Havre? Yes, there it is dead ahead. "Sections-echelon-starboard - Go!" Right goes my section. Up. Left. Keep in! There, that's nice, really nice. The whole squadron is now in Vics of three aircraft and the five Vics are echeloned to starboard. now, fingers out please 1 Squadron. Hope we don't overshoot. No, here we go. "Peel off - peel off - Go!" says the bull. His section banks left in formation beyond the vertical and disappears below. Johnny's section follows. Don't watch them - keep your eyes glued to Prosser. Here goes my section now. Down, down we dive in tight Vic, turning slightly left. Keep in - tucked right in! Stratton is OK the other side of Prosser. Right a bit. The controls are bloody stiff - must be doing a good 400. Flattening out now. Don't waffle! There goes the harbour. Buildings flashing by. We're nice and low. Keep in! Hold It! Pulling up now - up - over the rise - over the airfield now. Down we go again - just to make the Frogs lie down. Up over the trees - just! Round and back again. Good fun, this. Bet they're enjoying the show down there. I am! Here we go again, skimming the grass and heading straight for the trees. Pull up - up come our noses and we just clear them. Prosser's waving his hand. Break away! There goes Stratton's belly - away we go, nicely timed in a Prince of Wales, and I'm in my own.

What now? God, I feel ill! Let's give the old girl a last shake-up. What about an upward roll? Good idea - but watch the others - the air's full of flying bodies! Let's climb. Down in that clear space. Need some space for this. 300-350-360. That's enough. Adjust the tailwheel. Now back with the stick. Gently Up - up - a touch harder now. Horizon gone - look out along the wing. Wait till she's vertical - now look up. Stick central, now over to the right of the cockpit. Round she goes. Stop. Back with the stick. Look back. There's the horizon, upside down - stick forward - now over to the left - and out we roll. Not bad. Oh my god, I'm going to be sick...

Better land. Throttle right back. Slow down to 160 mph. Wheels down. Now flaps. Turn in now. Open the hood. Hold speed at 90. Tailwheel right back. Over the boundary. Hold off a fraction. Sink, sink - right back now with the stick. Bump, rumble, rumble, rumble - fine. No brakes - plenty of room. Tiny bit heavy that one. Not quite right. Oh well. Taxi in - run the petrol out of the carburettor, switch off ignition, brakes off, undo safety and parachute harness and jump out.

I stroll across to join the other pilots. Prosser fixes me with his characteristic dead-pan look.
"You just missed a steeple when we were beating-up Havre, Paul," he says casually.
"Did I?" Equally casual. "Glad I didn't see it!"

.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

CONVERGEANCE SETTINGS

A few days later an air marshall from the Air Ministery paid us a visit. He had come, he told us, to find out out why we had shot down every aircraft we had attacked while the Fighter Command squadrons in England were, in the main, only succeeding in "driving the German aircraft off in an easterly direction", as the communiques delicately phrased it.

Since we were no longer under the jurisdiction of Fighter Command we had no hesitation in telling the air marshall the reason.

All single-seat eight-gun squadrons in Fighter Command - both Hurricanes and Spitfires - had very poor practice shooting results before the outbreak of war. We all used the "Dowding Spread" at that time - a method of gun-harmonization laid down in accordance with the conviction of our Commander-in-Cheif, Air Marshall Sir Hugh Dowding, that his fighters would never see, let alone engage, enemy fighters.

In theory the Dowding Spread, which was worked out for shooting at enemy bombers from astern, seemed a good idea. Used against a big target, theoretically it produced a wide enough bullet pattern to compensate for aiming error and left sufficient lethal density to destroy such a target. Furthermore, the range laid down - 400 yards - was outside effective enemy defensive fire.

Now we were not armament experts, but we knew about flying and air firing, and we didn't like the Dowding Spread. We reckoned that, even if the experts were right and that at 400 yards' range the bullet velocity was still high enought to prevent tumble, maintain accuracy and penetrate armour (which seemed unlikely), the spread produced by aiming, shooting and random errors combined would be more than enough to drop lethal density below the minimum required for a kill, especially against a small target like a fighter - which WE were not at ALL convinced we would never meet. As for defensive fire from an enemy bomber, we felt his one or two guns hardly stood a chance against the Hurricane's eight. Curiously, the only thing we were wrong about turned out to be this last point.

Fighter Command had dismissed our theories, so during our month's shooting practice in the spring of 1939 we secretly harmonized all our guns on a spot at 250 yards range. Our shooting results on towed air targets showed we were right - we shot them clean away time and time again. Action in France had now proved this point: we had shot down every enemy aircraft we'd attacked.

To the air marshall, and later on to the Air Staff, the case was conclusive. All sigle-seat fighter squadrons were instucted to adopt our method. It was not a moment too soon...

Not long afterwards we made another contribution that was benefit all our fighter squadrond. While still with Fughter Command, in order to facilitate recognition by our observers on the ground the undersides of our wings were painted black on one side, white on the other. We considered thid to be idiotic, since the German aircraft were duck-egg blue underneath and very difficult to spot from below, whereas we stood out like flying chequerboards. So the Bull gave orders for the undersides of our aircraft to be painted duck-egg blue, and this too was later adopted for all RAF fighters.

.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

"By the time No.1 Squadron withdrew from France on 18th June 1940, they had gained a formidible combat reputation. Miraculously, they had destroyed a total of 155 enemy aircraft with only three of their own pilots having been killed, two wounded and one captured".

Fighter Pilot: a personal record of the campaign in France 1939-1940
by Paul Richey 1941.
1990 edition published by Leo Cooper.
ISBN 1-85089-550-3
.................................................. .................................................. .........................................





<center>http://www.uploadit.org/files/150903-Screensig.jpg

Whirlwind Whiner - First Of The Few

XyZspineZyX
10-26-2003, 04:54 PM
Just been reading, thought some of you might find it interesting...
(That's a 'u' in P*ssy BTW - I appear to have been censored /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif )
.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

AN INTERESTING POINT ABOUT MUNICH

On arrival at Tangmere I was rather surprised to hear about the flap that had swept through the fighter squadrons during the Munich crisis a few months before. All the 1 Squadron officers had spent a hectic week in the hangers with the aircraftsmen spraying camouflage paint on the brilliant silver aircraft. The troops had belted ammunition day and night. And the CO of 1 Squadron (which was equipped with obsolete Hawker Fury biplanes carrying two slow-firing machine-guns and capable of a top speed of 220 mph) had announced to his startled pilots: "Gentlemen, our aircraft are too slow to catch the German bombers: we must ram them."

Fortunately for the RAF, England and the world, Mr Chamberlain managed to stave off war for a year. That vital year gave the RAF time to re-equip the regular fighter squadrons with Hurricanes and Spitfires armed with eight rapid-firing machine-guns and capable of an average top speed of 320 mph.


.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

FORMATION PRACTICE

Soon we were in our cockpits, most of us in shirtsleeves in the heat. Engine after engine burst into life and was run up by its pilot. The Bull's order came clearly over thre R/T: "Come on, we're off! We're off!" He taxied past, followed by Hilly Brown and Leslie Clisby, who formed his section of three. Then came Johhny Walker,P*ssy Palmer and sergeant soper, the Red Section of "A" Flight, followed by Prosser Hanks, myself and Stratton, the Yellow Section. Next came "B" Flight - Leak Crusoe, Boy Mould, Sergeant Berry (Blue Section), and Billy Drake, Sergeant Clowes and Sergeant Albonico (Green Section).

The fifteen Hurricanes move forward together with a deep roar, slowly at first, then gathering speed. Tails come up, and controls get more feel. Bump-bump-bump. Almost off. A bit frightening, this take off. We fly! No...down we come again. Bump...Blast! Must have been a down-draught...Hold it! We're off now - straight over the cliff edge 400 feet above the sea. I see Prosser shut his eyes in mock terror. It is an odd feeling. As usual, I start to talk to myself. Wheels up. Keep in. Stick between knees. Come on, bloody wheels! Dropping behind a bit. Open your throttle! More! Wide! Ah, there are the two pretty red lights: the wheels are locked up. Now get in closer, for God's sake! The Bull's giving it too much throttle, blast him! Anyway - I'm tucked in now. That's fine.

"Sections astern - Sections astern - Go!" over the R/T from the bull. Back drops my section of three, a little left and underneath. Don't waffle, P*ssy, or I'll chew up your tail! Up we climb. Phew, it's hot! But I'll bet it looks nice. Hope so anyway.

Out we go over the sea. Flying south I think. Yes, there's the far side of the Seinne. "Turning right - turning right a fraction!" from the Bull. Round and out to sea again. Keep below Prosser in the turn - that's right. Hell, the sun's bloody bright! I can't see Prosser's wing when he's above me in the turn. Don't hit him! Watch his tailplane! The Bull again: "Coming out - coming out!" We straighten. Ah, that's better - I can see now. And the Bull once more: "For Number 5 Attack - Deploy - Go! Sections-line-astern - Go! Number 5 Attack - Go!"

Open out a bit. There goes Johnny. Now P*ssy. Soper. Prosser next. Now me. Down I go. Watch "B" Z Flight and synchronize with them. Pull up now. Fire! Break away quickly. Roll right over and down to the right. Rejoin. Where's Prosser got to? Can't see a bloody thing. Ah, there he is, up there. Full throttle! Up - up - cut the corner. Here we come behind him. Throttle back or you'll pass him. And there we are again, back in line-astern.

Prosser's waggling his wings. That means form Vic. "Re-form! - Re-form!" from the Bull. "Turning right now!" Towards Havre? Yes, there it is dead ahead. "Sections-echelon-starboard - Go!" Right goes my section. Up. Left. Keep in! There, that's nice, really nice. The whole squadron is now in Vics of three aircraft and the five Vics are echeloned to starboard. now, fingers out please 1 Squadron. Hope we don't overshoot. No, here we go. "Peel off - peel off - Go!" says the bull. His section banks left in formation beyond the vertical and disappears below. Johnny's section follows. Don't watch them - keep your eyes glued to Prosser. Here goes my section now. Down, down we dive in tight Vic, turning slightly left. Keep in - tucked right in! Stratton is OK the other side of Prosser. Right a bit. The controls are bloody stiff - must be doing a good 400. Flattening out now. Don't waffle! There goes the harbour. Buildings flashing by. We're nice and low. Keep in! Hold It! Pulling up now - up - over the rise - over the airfield now. Down we go again - just to make the Frogs lie down. Up over the trees - just! Round and back again. Good fun, this. Bet they're enjoying the show down there. I am! Here we go again, skimming the grass and heading straight for the trees. Pull up - up come our noses and we just clear them. Prosser's waving his hand. Break away! There goes Stratton's belly - away we go, nicely timed in a Prince of Wales, and I'm in my own.

What now? God, I feel ill! Let's give the old girl a last shake-up. What about an upward roll? Good idea - but watch the others - the air's full of flying bodies! Let's climb. Down in that clear space. Need some space for this. 300-350-360. That's enough. Adjust the tailwheel. Now back with the stick. Gently Up - up - a touch harder now. Horizon gone - look out along the wing. Wait till she's vertical - now look up. Stick central, now over to the right of the cockpit. Round she goes. Stop. Back with the stick. Look back. There's the horizon, upside down - stick forward - now over to the left - and out we roll. Not bad. Oh my god, I'm going to be sick...

Better land. Throttle right back. Slow down to 160 mph. Wheels down. Now flaps. Turn in now. Open the hood. Hold speed at 90. Tailwheel right back. Over the boundary. Hold off a fraction. Sink, sink - right back now with the stick. Bump, rumble, rumble, rumble - fine. No brakes - plenty of room. Tiny bit heavy that one. Not quite right. Oh well. Taxi in - run the petrol out of the carburettor, switch off ignition, brakes off, undo safety and parachute harness and jump out.

I stroll across to join the other pilots. Prosser fixes me with his characteristic dead-pan look.
"You just missed a steeple when we were beating-up Havre, Paul," he says casually.
"Did I?" Equally casual. "Glad I didn't see it!"

.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

CONVERGEANCE SETTINGS

A few days later an air marshall from the Air Ministery paid us a visit. He had come, he told us, to find out out why we had shot down every aircraft we had attacked while the Fighter Command squadrons in England were, in the main, only succeeding in "driving the German aircraft off in an easterly direction", as the communiques delicately phrased it.

Since we were no longer under the jurisdiction of Fighter Command we had no hesitation in telling the air marshall the reason.

All single-seat eight-gun squadrons in Fighter Command - both Hurricanes and Spitfires - had very poor practice shooting results before the outbreak of war. We all used the "Dowding Spread" at that time - a method of gun-harmonization laid down in accordance with the conviction of our Commander-in-Cheif, Air Marshall Sir Hugh Dowding, that his fighters would never see, let alone engage, enemy fighters.

In theory the Dowding Spread, which was worked out for shooting at enemy bombers from astern, seemed a good idea. Used against a big target, theoretically it produced a wide enough bullet pattern to compensate for aiming error and left sufficient lethal density to destroy such a target. Furthermore, the range laid down - 400 yards - was outside effective enemy defensive fire.

Now we were not armament experts, but we knew about flying and air firing, and we didn't like the Dowding Spread. We reckoned that, even if the experts were right and that at 400 yards' range the bullet velocity was still high enought to prevent tumble, maintain accuracy and penetrate armour (which seemed unlikely), the spread produced by aiming, shooting and random errors combined would be more than enough to drop lethal density below the minimum required for a kill, especially against a small target like a fighter - which WE were not at ALL convinced we would never meet. As for defensive fire from an enemy bomber, we felt his one or two guns hardly stood a chance against the Hurricane's eight. Curiously, the only thing we were wrong about turned out to be this last point.

Fighter Command had dismissed our theories, so during our month's shooting practice in the spring of 1939 we secretly harmonized all our guns on a spot at 250 yards range. Our shooting results on towed air targets showed we were right - we shot them clean away time and time again. Action in France had now proved this point: we had shot down every enemy aircraft we'd attacked.

To the air marshall, and later on to the Air Staff, the case was conclusive. All sigle-seat fighter squadrons were instucted to adopt our method. It was not a moment too soon...

Not long afterwards we made another contribution that was benefit all our fighter squadrond. While still with Fughter Command, in order to facilitate recognition by our observers on the ground the undersides of our wings were painted black on one side, white on the other. We considered thid to be idiotic, since the German aircraft were duck-egg blue underneath and very difficult to spot from below, whereas we stood out like flying chequerboards. So the Bull gave orders for the undersides of our aircraft to be painted duck-egg blue, and this too was later adopted for all RAF fighters.

.................................................. .................................................. .........................................

"By the time No.1 Squadron withdrew from France on 18th June 1940, they had gained a formidible combat reputation. Miraculously, they had destroyed a total of 155 enemy aircraft with only three of their own pilots having been killed, two wounded and one captured".

Fighter Pilot: a personal record of the campaign in France 1939-1940
by Paul Richey 1941.
1990 edition published by Leo Cooper.
ISBN 1-85089-550-3
.................................................. .................................................. .........................................





<center>http://www.uploadit.org/files/150903-Screensig.jpg

Whirlwind Whiner - First Of The Few

XyZspineZyX
10-26-2003, 07:46 PM
great read, i didnt know they called the convergence "Dowding Spread". thanks for the story

http://www.endlager.net/fis/pix/banners/fis_banner_01.jpg



http://www.dugg.ca/

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 12:54 AM
Good stuff. Reads like Ian Fleming. Short little sentences. One for each action. Sometimes one for each thought - don't muck about! God it's hot! etc etc.

Thanks for posting.

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 01:24 AM
Great read. Thanx for posting. I love that 1st pearson stuff. It's like you're right in the cockpit. I learned a couple of things too. What's that about adjusting the tail wheel? When he was doing the roll.

<center>http://www.uploadit.org/files/261003-NewSig_06.gif

"Any information that we receive concerning the real world is carefully controlled"

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 01:30 AM
Great read, hope the 303s get fixed before the spitfire gets here http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

<center>http://www.geocities.com/leadspittersig/LS1.txt
Good dogfighters bring ammo home, Great ones don't. (c) Leadspitter</center>

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 04:20 AM
helgstrand wrote:
- Great read. Thanx for posting. I love that 1st
- pearson stuff. It's like you're right in the
- cockpit. I learned a couple of things too. What's
- that about adjusting the tail wheel? When he was
- doing the roll.
-
LOL

And what IS with the tail wheel?

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 10:41 AM
Low_Flyer wrote:
- we secretly harmonized all our guns on a
- spot at 250 yards range. Our shooting results on
- towed air targets showed we were right - we shot
- them clean away time and time again.

Good read, thanks! /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif
But, well, how much is one yard? /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif



<center>http://www.uploadit.org/files/170903-G55_Firma.jpg </center>

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 10:48 AM
Cippacometa wrote:
-
- - But, well, how much is one yard?



-3 feet
-and what about that damned tail wheel?


<center>http://www.uploadit.org/files/261003-NewSig_06.gif

"Any information that we receive concerning the real world is carefully controlled"

Message Edited on 10/28/0301:50AM by helgstrand

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 10:56 AM
do yourselves all a favour and get the book,its a great read and very absorbing it also has pictures of all the No1 chaps out in france as well as some good pics of various allied/axis early a/c and some of the other characters in the book,such as the doctor who saved paul richies life and a capitaine cassanove a french pilot who richey flew with.

its almost required reading at our squadron(Tangmere pilots)

GET THE BOOK
the passages quoted are just a taster of the whole thing,it gets even better,


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
G-BPDU
http://www.southernflightcentre.com/warrior-s.jpg

I fly this!!

http://www.tangmerepilots-raf.co.uk
No1-Squadron Royal Air Force/tea boy

Tully__
10-28-2003, 10:56 AM
Cippacometa wrote:
-
- ...But, well, how much is one yard?


3 feet /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif



To be a little more helpful, 1 yard is about 91.44cm. As a rough guide, 11 yards = 10 metres

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Salut
Tully

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 10:56 AM
helgstrand wrote:
-
- Cippacometa wrote:
--
-- - But, well, how much is one yard?
-
-
-
--3 feet

I hate you! http://forums.ubi.com/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-mad.gif

Ok, well, I got some infos:

1 yard = 3 feet = 91.44 cm (crazy English! /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif )
So, 250 yds = 228.6 m.
Looks like my FB Hurricane's setting of 200-250 m was correct /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif



<center>http://www.uploadit.org/files/170903-G55_Firma.jpg </center>

fluke39
10-28-2003, 11:08 AM
nice post

i bought the book "fighter pilot" a couple of months ago and was impressed by it's standard and accessibility - as i have read somewhere (in another book i think) Richey turned out to be "as good a author as he was a pilot."

for those who don't have the book - it was the very first book published on WWII fighter pilots - and was brought out, i think, around 1942/3 - (without publishing richey's name, due to censorship.) - and in my opinion is one of the best books on this subject. - it deals with the Battle of france - from the RAF perspective - a subject which i have seen very few books about.


oddly enough i don't remember the Munich bit - does anyone else find something odd with the sentence:

"Gentlemen, our aircraft are too slow to catch the German bombers: we must ram them."

- i have to ask - if they can't catch them, how can they ram them? !!


p.s Low_Flyer - i take it you've read the bit where they invite the german pilot to dinner? i think that chapters one of the highlights of the book ! it shows the respect pilots had for each other, and also the, soon to be lost, innocence of that early period of the war.

<center><img src=http://mysite.freeserve.com/Angel_one_five/fighterpilot.jpg>

if you don't have this book- buy it - you may find it a little short but it's definitely a great read and truly a classic of military literature.

<center><img src=http://mysite.freeserve.com/Angel_one_five/flukelogo.jpg>

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 11:10 AM
Cippacometa wrote:
- helgstrand wrote:
--
-- Cippacometa wrote:
---
--- - But, well, how much is one yard?
--
--
--
---3 feet
-
- I hate you!
http://server2.uploadit.org/files/281003-MYsmiley_01.gif


Message Edited on 10/28/0302:15AM by helgstrand

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 11:25 AM
i believe you can ram them if you are converging with each other,i guess thats how he intended to do it

the munich bit is deffo in there,it was the first time i thought about any positve that came out of munich,but if you think about it ,its very true an extra year to re-equip probably saved us from a total defeat!


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
G-BPDU
http://www.southernflightcentre.com/warrior-s.jpg

I fly this!!

http://www.tangmerepilots-raf.co.uk
No1-Squadron Royal Air Force/tea boy

fluke39
10-28-2003, 12:10 PM
mothyp wrote:
- i believe you can ram them if you are converging
- with each other,i guess thats how he intended to do
- it


o ok, i see

- the munich bit is deffo in there,it was the first
- time i thought about any positve that came out of
- munich,but if you think about it ,its very true an
- extra year to re-equip probably saved us from a
- total defeat!


yes agreed - p.s - wasn't saying i doubted it was in there - just questioning the logic of the -can't catch ,but can ram -thing , that u answered above /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif



<center><img src=http://mysite.freeserve.com/Angel_one_five/flukelogo.jpg>

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 12:57 PM
nps
still a fantastic book gets better everytime you read it!


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
G-BPDU
http://www.southernflightcentre.com/warrior-s.jpg

I fly this!!

http://www.tangmerepilots-raf.co.uk
No1-Squadron Royal Air Force/tea boy

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 03:48 PM
great read - will look for the book.

and what is it with the tail-wheel?

Kernow
249 IAP

XyZspineZyX
10-28-2003, 07:39 PM
Glad you all enjoyed the 'taster' for a great book.
As fluke 39 noted, there is a definate air of lost innocence towards the end of the book - still trying to work out what the tailwheel stuff was all about..

The formation flying passage reminded me of trying to keep up with the rest of my squadron in FB.





<center>http://www.uploadit.org/files/150903-Screensig.jpg

Whirlwind Whiner - First Of The Few