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papotex
02-09-2009, 03:34 PM
I am moving to europe, Italy to be exact.
My question is about taking my laptop and movie projector with me.

I know the voltages are different over there and there is adapters.
but since the volages are diferent, is that going to be a problem?

In the AC adapter for my laptop it says 100-240v.
does that mean that ill be ok just by pluging the laptop on the wall just using a adapter?

papotex
02-09-2009, 03:34 PM
I am moving to europe, Italy to be exact.
My question is about taking my laptop and movie projector with me.

I know the voltages are different over there and there is adapters.
but since the volages are diferent, is that going to be a problem?

In the AC adapter for my laptop it says 100-240v.
does that mean that ill be ok just by pluging the laptop on the wall just using a adapter?

FI_Sacktime
02-09-2009, 03:46 PM
I've taken my Laptop to Europe several times and had no issues, you will need a plug adaptor, or you can order a powercord form your laptop mfr (be prepared to spend $ on a stupid cord). I just used my universal plug adaptor with no issues, as for your projector that is a different story, I don't know

Urufu_Shinjiro
02-09-2009, 04:43 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by papotex:
In the AC adapter for my laptop it says 100-240v.
does that mean that ill be ok just by pluging the laptop on the wall just using a adapter? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

If it says 100-240v then you're fine with a simple adapter.

na85
02-09-2009, 05:44 PM
Surprisingly enough voltage isn't a huge deal. The big thing is the FREQUENCY of the power. Here in north america, people call household power 110 volts, 120 volts, 115, etc etc etc. Realistically, for most of our electronics, as long as it's somewhere near 120 V it's okay, as long as that voltage is delivered at a steady 60 Hz.

mortoma
02-09-2009, 06:13 PM
Italy uses a 3-pin plug. Does your laptop power adapter also say "50/60Hz" on it?? If so, then both the voltage and the frequency will be alright for your laptop adapter. Pretty sure that most euro countries use 50 hertz and not 60 like in the states.

Zeus-cat
02-09-2009, 06:16 PM
Your laptop runs on a battery. Batteries deliver power in DC, not AC. The charger converts AC power to DC for your battery. Most chargers will accept 120 (or 110 if you prefer) or 240V with no problem. The frequency should not be a big issue for a converter.

Anything that runs off line voltage will probably not work. Electric razors being the one common exception; although you need to check to make sure that your razor can handle 240V.

Leave your projector at home or buy an expensive converter that takes 240V/50Hz power and makes it into 120V/60Hz power.

mortoma
02-09-2009, 06:26 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Zeus-cat:
Your laptop runs on a battery. Batteries deliver power in DC, not AC. The charger converts AC power to DC for your battery. Most chargers will accept 120 (or 110 if you prefer) or 240V with no problem. The frequency should not be a big issue for a converter.

Anything that runs off line voltage will probably not work. Electric razors being the one common exception; although you need to check to make sure that your razor can handle 240V.

Leave your projector at home or buy an expensive converter that takes 240V/50Hz power and makes it into 120V/60Hz power. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>There are some adaptors where voltage and hertz would matter, but most laptop adapters, no. Laptops usually use a "wide range" input for both frequencies and voltage. I have a degree in electronic/computer technology so let's not be arguing with me. I have some power tranformers/adapters that would indeed not work with 240/50Hz. Just because something transforms AC voltage down to a lower AC voltage and then rectifies it and filters it into DC does not mean it will take a wide range of AC voltage or frequencies at the input. Never fails, everyone thinks theyre an expert on everything. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Zeus-cat
02-09-2009, 06:47 PM
mortoma,

I'm an electrical engineer so don't roll your eyes at me. Of course, there are ALWAYS exceptions, but most modern computer chargers handle 120 or 240. And all the chargers/adapters I have used here, or overseas, clearly stated the voltage input and output. I also said SHOULD; I didn't guarantee it.

If someone has a charger that they are planning to take to another country they need to look at the label on it and make sure it can handle what they have planned. They also need to make sure they have an adapter that allows them to plug it in! That is probably the biggest issue they wil have.

papotex
02-09-2009, 08:36 PM
thank you so much guys, man... in my experience, this forum has better tech support than the ones you have to pay.

Im glad to be part of this forum thanks guys

Ba5tard5word
02-09-2009, 09:26 PM
When I studied in the UK my friends with laptops from the US would just pry open the weird British wall outlets and plug their US plugs directly in...probably not the best idea but it worked fine, no explosions.

Italy/France/Germany have the plugs with two round holes, all you need is a little plug adapter, like people above said the adapter in your laptop plug (the black boxy thing probably halfway down the plug or inside your computer) will do the adapting I think.


<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">in my experience, this forum has better tech support than the ones you have to pay. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes definitely!

Xiolablu3
02-10-2009, 05:01 AM
The 3rd (top) plug on the 3-pin is just for safety. It controls the covers over the electric points, so kids cannot stick pens in them.

I am pretty sure thats the only thing the 3rd pin is used for in Britain? Am I correct?

DD_crash
02-10-2009, 05:14 AM
The third pin is for Earthing.

STENKA_69.GIAP
02-10-2009, 05:18 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Xiolablu3:
The 3rd (top) plug on the 3-pin is just for safety. It controls the covers over the electric points, so kids cannot stick pens in them.

I am pretty sure thats the only thing the 3rd pin is used for in Britain? Am I correct? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
The third pin in the British plug is for connection to earth.

You also may find the equivalent of that third pin on many French or German plugs.

If your electrical item (in this case laptop) has been designed and fitted with a simple two pin plug it does not need the earth. In the UK you buy a "shaver adaptor" converting the 3 slots to two holes. In France or Germany you can just plug in your two pin plug ignoring the extra hole or side tabs.

DIRTY-MAC
02-10-2009, 08:58 AM
Im from Sweden, and I didnt have any problems with my laptop when I was in America. worked like a charm.