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nealn
07-21-2005, 10:48 AM
I do not post often but thought I would share this.

I am an eye surgeon in practice in Mesa Arizona, not too far from Falcon field.

One thing I love about my job is that I provide eye care for many folks in their eighties, some of whom are World War two vets, and have retired here in sunny Arizona, (where some of them had their flight training.) I will always take time out of an exam to talk to them about their experiences. Over the years I have spoken with guys who have been Aces and some not. Some have flown P51's, some P47's. (One P51 pilot had one eye. He had lost one to the rear gunner of an ME110 he had shot down over Germany.) One flew P40's in China! (He hated the food and living conditions their). One flew the Grumman Wildcat. I even had a patient who was an expatriot Brit and flew Spitfires. (He loved the MarkV best out of the lot.) Not surprisingly most of the fighter pilots love the particular plane they flew.

I have also spoken with many B24 pilots, B17 pilots and B25 pilots. Last year I operated on a man who had been a ball turret gunner in a B17 over Germany. When I asked him how he felt about his cataract surgery he said, "compared to sitting in a glass bubble for hours at at time and having people shooting at you it was a piece of cake."

I have imeasurable respect for these men and what they accomplished and just thought I would share some of my experiences. I feel fortunate to be able to provide their eye care and to have tthee opportunity to talk to them about WW2 aviation, a topic all of us on this forum love.

Neal Nirenberg MD FACS

nealn
07-21-2005, 10:48 AM
I do not post often but thought I would share this.

I am an eye surgeon in practice in Mesa Arizona, not too far from Falcon field.

One thing I love about my job is that I provide eye care for many folks in their eighties, some of whom are World War two vets, and have retired here in sunny Arizona, (where some of them had their flight training.) I will always take time out of an exam to talk to them about their experiences. Over the years I have spoken with guys who have been Aces and some not. Some have flown P51's, some P47's. (One P51 pilot had one eye. He had lost one to the rear gunner of an ME110 he had shot down over Germany.) One flew P40's in China! (He hated the food and living conditions their). One flew the Grumman Wildcat. I even had a patient who was an expatriot Brit and flew Spitfires. (He loved the MarkV best out of the lot.) Not surprisingly most of the fighter pilots love the particular plane they flew.

I have also spoken with many B24 pilots, B17 pilots and B25 pilots. Last year I operated on a man who had been a ball turret gunner in a B17 over Germany. When I asked him how he felt about his cataract surgery he said, "compared to sitting in a glass bubble for hours at at time and having people shooting at you it was a piece of cake."

I have imeasurable respect for these men and what they accomplished and just thought I would share some of my experiences. I feel fortunate to be able to provide their eye care and to have tthee opportunity to talk to them about WW2 aviation, a topic all of us on this forum love.

Neal Nirenberg MD FACS

Kazimierz.
07-21-2005, 11:15 AM
You're a lucky man, first hand accounts are always full of emotion, and not always sadness, I had this experience at Duxford when an old man looked at my two friends and mentioned they looked like Luftwaffe Pilots ( Well they are German, and had pilot jackets on) in the course of the conversation they mentioned that (Germany) had 'lost' the war. This man, Larry, said "Dont think of it as loosing the war, think of it as loosing a tyrant, everybody won the war once the Third Reich had gone"

F19_Ob
07-21-2005, 11:40 AM
Thanks for sharing .

Funny....All those aviators ending up at the same surgeon who happen to be especially interested in them and their timeperiod.
Lucky for you, and seemingly for them aswell with someone especially interested in their cases.
Perhaps the man upstairs had something to do with this luck? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

arcadeace
07-21-2005, 11:50 AM
Thanks nealn... your's has been a privilege http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

nealn
07-21-2005, 12:19 PM
Yes I feel fortunate indeed. I think part of the reason I have seen so many of these folks is that Ihave been in practice 20 years and have practiced in Florida and Arizona. Both of these places have warm climates and had Army air and Naval air training stations in WW2. Many of the pilots had fond memories of theem, remembered the warm weather and decided to retire to them later in life.

I do consider myself fortunate to have met them.

I have worked hard to obtain my level of training but consider myself especially blessed to be healthy, have a wonderful wife and kids, and not to have had to do what these fine gentlemen did.

Neal N

Taylortony
07-21-2005, 12:31 PM
yes and its a privelege to know such folks that allow us to live our lives now in the style we do http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif