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deskpilot
09-28-2008, 08:16 AM
I'm not talking about pitch attitude just compass bearing. In the hurricane which appears to have no aileron trim, I'm just basically having to use rudder trim to correct the constant tendancy the plane has to roll due to the torque reaction. This means that basically I am continually adjusting just to try to fly at a consistent compass bearing. If I want to fly at a bearing of 90 degrees for example, I end up driftng off 90 first one way then the other so I'm zigzagging either side of 90 degrees. This is particularly annoying when trying to find those damned difficult to spot grass runways, and I'm sure I must be doig something wrong but what? Surely it is possible to leave the controls alone and still fly at a constant compass heading...or isn't it? Am I right in thinking that twin engined planes don't have this problem because the two opposite-turning propellors cancel each other out?

deskpilot
09-28-2008, 08:16 AM
I'm not talking about pitch attitude just compass bearing. In the hurricane which appears to have no aileron trim, I'm just basically having to use rudder trim to correct the constant tendancy the plane has to roll due to the torque reaction. This means that basically I am continually adjusting just to try to fly at a consistent compass bearing. If I want to fly at a bearing of 90 degrees for example, I end up driftng off 90 first one way then the other so I'm zigzagging either side of 90 degrees. This is particularly annoying when trying to find those damned difficult to spot grass runways, and I'm sure I must be doig something wrong but what? Surely it is possible to leave the controls alone and still fly at a constant compass heading...or isn't it? Am I right in thinking that twin engined planes don't have this problem because the two opposite-turning propellors cancel each other out?

Jex_TE
09-28-2008, 08:27 AM
By using the rudder trim I can sometimes get the plane to stay where I want it, sometimes it seems to need a tiny nudge from time to time. Trim takes a while to take full affect and each change of speed can affect trim as well but it is possible to level fly with rudder trim.

Twin engines in my experience don't always fly straight (I like the P38 and that seems to drift a little). I've also read here that not all planes have opposing rotation on the engines.

general_kalle
09-28-2008, 11:02 AM
i have found that it is aktually very few of the twin engine planes that have counter rotating props. The P38 has, i havent noticed any other...

M_Gunz
09-28-2008, 11:33 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by deskpilot:
I'm not talking about pitch attitude just compass bearing. In the hurricane which appears to have no aileron trim, I'm just basically having to use rudder trim to correct the constant tendancy the plane has to roll due to the torque reaction. This means that basically I am continually adjusting just to try to fly at a consistent compass bearing. If I want to fly at a bearing of 90 degrees for example, I end up driftng off 90 first one way then the other so I'm zigzagging either side of 90 degrees. This is particularly annoying when trying to find those damned difficult to spot grass runways, and I'm sure I must be doig something wrong but what? Surely it is possible to leave the controls alone and still fly at a constant compass heading...or isn't it? Am I right in thinking that twin engined planes don't have this problem because the two opposite-turning propellors cancel each other out? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You should trim with speed and prop/engine changes. Once settled you should not have to.
Sounds like you're either changing speed/torque or over-correcting.

dirkpit7
09-28-2008, 12:18 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> Surely it is possible to leave the controls alone and still fly at a constant compass heading...or isn't it? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

No, it isn't possible. These are old prop planes with no autopilot. You have to fly them all the time. By trimming you can reduce your workload but you can't get the plane to fly you to the target...you have to do that yourself.

That being said, there is an autopilot feature in the game (default key is 'A'). That means the computer will take over your plane and fly it along the waypoints. It will also do the fighting and land if you want.

x6BL_Brando
09-28-2008, 01:10 PM
Some single engine planes will hold their heading quite well provided you have made the correct adjustments to pitch trim, yaw trim and throttle setting. The P40-E springs to mind as a very stable ride, for example. Even then, a small amount of rudder input is necessary to hold a true continuous heading. In this game I find the use of rudder pedals to be invaluable, as holding true using a twist-grip joystick is quite a strain.

Reducing speed and/or reducing propeller RPM helps greatly by reducing the overall torque effect. In the planes which don't have a trim-able rudder, or those with pre-set trim tabs, a reduction in speed is absolutely essential when looking for a stable cruise speed combined with the least deviation from heading.

And wind direction and turbulence at altitude aren't even modelled in the game!

B

P.FunkAdelic
09-29-2008, 03:35 AM
German aircraft + twist rudder = pain the M****ille.

STENKA_69.GIAP
09-29-2008, 06:24 AM
Winge Winge Winge...

In real life you will calculate your CAP adjusting for the difference between magnetic north and true north then adjusting for side/tail/head winds. Of course these winds will vary in force and direction at different altitudes/times. The weather forecast may also be wrong.

So if you don't have a radio beacon or a GPS you look to the distance and select a ground feature that is on about the right cap. Fly towards that on visual rather than staring at your compass. Compare what you see with your map for ground features (roads/rivers/railways/towns/lakes) every 5-15 minutes then readjust your cap.

Yes navigation is about a number of zigzags towards a destination.

If you visit www.69giap.com (http://www.69giap.com) and look in the training section - there is a navigation training pack - which starts easy and goes as far as blue water search patterns.

M_Gunz
09-29-2008, 07:40 AM
In B-17II the navigation is more precise depending on the player of course.
It's one of the big things that B-17II tries to teach/incorporate since precision bombing
requires precision navigation.
You watch through the bombsight and use it to figure out your wind drift.
It's amazing what B-17II does include.
They had a WWII pro as consultant and he did tell all he could, it's not a 100% Norden.

Wildnoob
09-29-2008, 11:30 AM
strange, I never had the problem of the plane roll because the torque. wat happen with me is that the plane normally fall out of course, but it's not drastic as roll.

wat I really don't manage is maintein a constant altitude. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/bigtears.gif