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horseback
01-28-2004, 11:03 PM
A friend of mine got a pocketwatch as a present from his wife the other day. It's made of nickel, and there's a Soviet flag superimposed over a sword crossed with a rifle. The words (phonetically) "Otechestvennaya Voina" encircle one side and "Velikaya Otechestvennaya 1941-1946" encircle the other side.

He'd like to know what the words mean; we think it was an award for wartime service, but unfortunately, my Russian-English dictionary is buried somewhere in my garage, and the words are not familiar to me (it's been about 8 years since I last conversed in the language, and thirty since I took it in high school). Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

horseback
01-28-2004, 11:03 PM
A friend of mine got a pocketwatch as a present from his wife the other day. It's made of nickel, and there's a Soviet flag superimposed over a sword crossed with a rifle. The words (phonetically) "Otechestvennaya Voina" encircle one side and "Velikaya Otechestvennaya 1941-1946" encircle the other side.

He'd like to know what the words mean; we think it was an award for wartime service, but unfortunately, my Russian-English dictionary is buried somewhere in my garage, and the words are not familiar to me (it's been about 8 years since I last conversed in the language, and thirty since I took it in high school). Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

crazyivan1970
01-28-2004, 11:41 PM
"The words (phonetically) "Otechestvennaya Voina" encircle one side and "Velikaya Otechestvennaya 1941-1946" encircle the other side.
"

"Otechestvennaya Voina" - Patriotic War
"Velikaya Otechestvennaya 1941-1946" - Great Patriotic War 1941-1946

Velikaya = Great
Otechestvennaya is hard to translate, all sources reffer to it as patriotic... but it is now... even that Otechestvo has patriotic context in it. But really Otechestvo means... place where i am from, my country ..etc but used in patriotic context.. hope i am making sence lol

V!
Regards,

VFC*Crazyivan aka VFC*HOST

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Kozhedub: In combat potential, the Yak-3, La-7 and La-9 fighters were indisputably superior to the Bf-109s and Fw-190s. But, as they say, no matter how good the violin may be, much depends on the violinist. I always felt respect for an enemy pilot whose plane I failed to down.

reverse5
01-29-2004, 12:55 AM
Othecetstvo - It means Father's as in fatherland, hence - Great Patriotic War or Great War for Fatherland.

Platypus_1.JaVA
01-29-2004, 02:48 AM
do they teach russian in high school in america?

1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge,
ye shall be judged: and with what
measure ye mete, it shall be measured
to you again.

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HansKnappstick
01-29-2004, 06:18 AM
All in all, "Velikaya Otechestvennaya Voina" is the term Russians use for the Second World War. As you see they exclude their own adventures from 1939 and 1940 as well as anything that happened before 1941 elsewhere.

Interesting why 1946...?

But hey, we the Europeans exclude the Sino-Japanese conflict before 1939 and (in many cases) the war in the Pacific after 9th May 1945 from our notion.

horseback
01-29-2004, 07:08 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Platypus_1.JaVA:
do they teach russian in high school in america?

1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge,
ye shall be judged: and with what
measure ye mete, it shall be measured
to you again.

http://acompletewasteofspace.com/forum/index.php&lt;HR&gt;&lt;/BLOCKQUOTE&gt; (http://acompletewasteofspace.com/forum/index.php<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>They)They did in the late 60s - early 70s at my high school in Tucson, Arizona. We had something like a total of 50 kids from two schools in the four levels (freshman, sophomore, junior , & senior) & the instructor, Gospidin McNabb, also taught a couple of other languages as well. I don't know about the level of our scholarship, but I still knew enough 30 years later to converse with the fellow at the Aeroflot desk in Madrid International & find out where the Delta desk was. (He told me that if I liked, he could get me "as far as Havana.") The Delta desk was two hundred meters farther, and the carts were free, unlike at most Stateside airports.

My guess on the 1946 date is that the original recipient may have had a period of occupation duty, post-war.

Bolshoi Spasebo to all that stepped up to the plate.

horseback

"Here's your new Mustangs, boys. You can learn to fly'em on the way to the target. Cheers!" -LTCOL Don Blakeslee, 4th FG CO, February 27th, 1944

[This message was edited by horseback on Thu January 29 2004 at 07:24 AM.]

noshens
01-29-2004, 08:04 AM
When I was in school in one of the USSR republics (after the break down) there were two wars: Great Patriotic - Germany vs USSR and World War 2 - all other nations (Germany included). Much more emphasizes was given to the Great Patriotic.