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View Full Version : OT: Stoned Cows Lunch On Vintage Airplane



Lateralus_14
08-31-2004, 08:29 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/08/31/ncows31.xml&sSheet=/news/2004/08/31/ixhome.html

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The farmer's field near Hereford seemed a perfect landing spot for three aircraft enthusiasts and their 1948 Auster J1-N plane at the weekend.

But when they returned from dining at a nearby pub they discovered that their cherished flying machine had itself been lunch for a herd of Herefordshire bullocks who caused thousands of pounds worth of damage by chewing a large hole in the fuselage.

Mike Jones, 66, a former police officer from Bristol, said: "We usually land in farmers' fields, but this is the first time something like this has happened." When the farmer found out he put up barbed wire to protect the plane from further damage, but the cows broke it down to eat some more.

"It might have been the white colour that attracted them. The wings are covered with chemicals, so maybe all these cows were on a high."

The other two enthusiasts on the trip were Lisa Kingscot, 42, a businesswoman from Oaksey Park near Cirencester, Glos, and Tony Cooper, 55, who is retired, also from Oaksey Park.

The plane had to be dismantled and taken home on a trailer.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Lateralus_14
08-31-2004, 08:29 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2004/08/31/ncows31.xml&sSheet=/news/2004/08/31/ixhome.html

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>The farmer's field near Hereford seemed a perfect landing spot for three aircraft enthusiasts and their 1948 Auster J1-N plane at the weekend.

But when they returned from dining at a nearby pub they discovered that their cherished flying machine had itself been lunch for a herd of Herefordshire bullocks who caused thousands of pounds worth of damage by chewing a large hole in the fuselage.

Mike Jones, 66, a former police officer from Bristol, said: "We usually land in farmers' fields, but this is the first time something like this has happened." When the farmer found out he put up barbed wire to protect the plane from further damage, but the cows broke it down to eat some more.

"It might have been the white colour that attracted them. The wings are covered with chemicals, so maybe all these cows were on a high."

The other two enthusiasts on the trip were Lisa Kingscot, 42, a businesswoman from Oaksey Park near Cirencester, Glos, and Tony Cooper, 55, who is retired, also from Oaksey Park.

The plane had to be dismantled and taken home on a trailer.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

WTE_Galway
08-31-2004, 09:41 PM
actually not an unusual problem with fabric covered aeroplanes

i remember someone telling me once one of the occupational hazards of flying ski/float planes in northern canada was moose eating/leaning on/rubbing against the control surfaces when parked over night