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XyZspineZyX
10-19-2003, 03:30 AM
JUst thought I'd through this out in forum. I built a model of this ship when I was a kid. The Roayl Navy now has a Frigate named the Iron Duke.

The Battleship, HMS Iron Duke was a beutifull vessle. sorry I don't know much about it's history, but it was a sharp looking boat!

http://www.military-art.com/images/dhm_733_small.jpg

http://www.warships1.com/BRbb11_IDuke-LD1.jpg



http://www.warships1.com/BRbb11_IDuke_prt.jpg


http://www.warships1.com/BRbb11_IDuke_bow.jpg




http://home.comcast.net/~ick_352nd/

http://home.comcast.net/~ick_352nd/aceshigh.jpg


Message Edited on 10/19/0303:35AM by Ick_352nd

XyZspineZyX
10-19-2003, 03:30 AM
JUst thought I'd through this out in forum. I built a model of this ship when I was a kid. The Roayl Navy now has a Frigate named the Iron Duke.

The Battleship, HMS Iron Duke was a beutifull vessle. sorry I don't know much about it's history, but it was a sharp looking boat!

http://www.military-art.com/images/dhm_733_small.jpg

http://www.warships1.com/BRbb11_IDuke-LD1.jpg



http://www.warships1.com/BRbb11_IDuke_prt.jpg


http://www.warships1.com/BRbb11_IDuke_bow.jpg




http://home.comcast.net/~ick_352nd/

http://home.comcast.net/~ick_352nd/aceshigh.jpg


Message Edited on 10/19/0303:35AM by Ick_352nd

XyZspineZyX
10-19-2003, 04:32 AM
In 1929, the Iron Duke was disarmed and converted to a TS. During 1939'45 she was a depot ship at Scapa.


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"Only a dead 'chamber pot' is a good 'chamber pot'!"

XyZspineZyX
10-19-2003, 07:01 AM
All the old battle wagons are beutiful if ya ask me



"Of all my accomplishments I may have achieved during the war, I am proudest of the fact that I never lost a wingman. It was my view that no kill was worth the life of a wingman. . . . Pilots in my unit who lost wingmen on this basis were prohibited from leading a [section]. They were made to fly as wingman, instead."
Erich 'Bubi' Hartmann "Karaya One"

XyZspineZyX
10-19-2003, 10:06 AM
Eh, I built the AIrfix kit, when I was a child /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Cheers,

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 05:27 PM
Ick,

HMS IRON DUKE carried the flag of Admiral John Jellicoe at the great Battle of Jutland in 1916. It is a mystery to me why the British government did not preserve her as a memorial. Perhaps it was because, in the eyes of the British public, Jutland was not the expected dramatic Trafalgar-like victory which had been axpected. Nevertheless, it was an historic battle and defining strategic victory for the Royal Navy.

It saddens me that so few of these awe-inspiring ships have survived. Today, the only surviving WW1 era dreadnought in the world is the USS TEXAS, which actually served a deployment in the North Sea during the 1918 attachment of four US dreadnoughts as the 6th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet. The last one to go previously was the Turkish battle-cruiser YAVUZ, which was actually the famous and historically noteworthy SMS GOEBEN of the German High Sea Fleet (see Flight of the GOEBEN!). She survived until the early 70's. An earnest effort on the part of the Federal German government to acquire her back from the Turks for memorial purposes was regrettably defeated by cynical NATO/European political acrimony - German war-mongers, blah, blah, blah. The decision to send GOEBEN to the scrapyard was a complete insult to history IMO.



Blutarski

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 05:45 PM
Agree agree Blutarski, it´s a shame that some of these ships weren´t kept as memorials, both in respect to the men that served onboard and lost their lives on these ships and to the countries they served during the wars. Both WW1 and WW2.
A big shame!

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 06:03 PM
was it a british victory ?

Battle of Jutland also known by the Germans as the Battle of the Skagerrak (Skaggerakschlacht) occurred on 31 May - 1 June 1916, the first and the only fullscale battleship clash during WW I between the German High Seas Fleet and the British Grand Fleet. After an inconclusive encounter both sides claimed victory.


There was no chance that the German fleet would seek an head-to-head encounter with the British. The Royal Navy's superiority in numbers was massive - thirty-three dreadnoughts compared to eighteen German craft. During the battle the actual force under Jellicoe was twenty-eight dreadnoughts and nine battle cruisers, while Scheer had sixteen dreadnoughts and five battle cruisers. The British were superior in lighter vessels as well. In terms of weight of broadside the British had an advantage of 332,360 lb against 134,216 lb.
This British superiority was countered by certain technical factors - German gunnery was more accurate, their ships had thicker armour against torpedo attack and more water-tight doors, their armour-piercing shells were more effective than the British shells and vitally the British used an oversensitive propellant and their magazines were not well protected. Another serious blow to the British was the exceptionally poor communications between their ships.

at the end of the battle:

The British lost fourteen ships of 111,000 tons total and 6,784 men. The Germans lost eleven ships of 62,000 tons total and 3,058 men.

For the British, the outcome could be seen as giving a tactical loss but a strategic gain. The Germans left the field, the British remained and were ready to continue the next day



http://www.bayern.de/Layout/wappen.gif

Bavaria is one of the oldest European states.
It dates back to about 500 A.D., when the Roman Empire was overcome by the onslaught of Germanic tribes. According to a widespread theory, the Bavarian tribe had descended from the Romans who remained in the country, the original Celtic population and the Germanic invaders.

Bavarian History : http://www.bayern.de/Bayern/Information/geschichteE.html#kap0

Message Edited on 10/20/0305:05PM by Boandlgramer

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 06:06 PM
Agreed here too. For there to be no battleship of the Royal Navy in existence, other than those at the bottom of the ocean, is appalling.
What have we got? HMS Victory from Trafalgar, HMS Warrior from the 1860s, HMS Belfast (cruiser) and HMS Cavalier (destroyer) from WW2. Plus a few submarines and odds and sods.
At one time, and for a long time, the world's greatest navy.
Where did it all go?

<CENTER>


<IMG SRC="http://www.apqa16.dsl.pipex.com/airplane1.3.jpg"


Ladies & gentlemen, this is the captain speaking. Thankyou for choosing to fly Mandarin Airlines. Those passengers sitting on the left-hand side of the aeroplane please make yourselves comfortable. Those sitting on the right... please look to your left!

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 06:11 PM
Boandlgramer wrote:
- was it a british victory ?
-
-
- Battle of Jutland also known by the Germans as the
- Battle of the Skagerrak (Skaggerakschlacht) occurred
- on 31 May - 1 June 1916, the first and the only
- fullscale battleship clash during WW I between the
- German High Seas Fleet and the British Grand Fleet.
- After an inconclusive encounter both sides claimed
- victory.
-
-
- There was no chance that the German fleet would seek
- an head-to-head encounter with the British. The
- Royal Navy's superiority in numbers was massive -
- thirty-three dreadnoughts compared to eighteen
- German craft. During the battle the actual force
- under Jellicoe was twenty-eight dreadnoughts and
- nine battle cruisers, while Scheer had sixteen
- dreadnoughts and five battle cruisers. The British
- were superior in lighter vessels as well. In terms
- of weight of broadside the British had an advantage
- of 332,360 lb against 134,216 lb.
- This British superiority was countered by certain
- technical factors - German gunnery was more
- accurate, their ships had thicker armour against
- torpedo attack and more water-tight doors, their
- armour-piercing shells were more effective than the
- British shells and vitally the British used an
- oversensitive propellant and their magazines were
- not well protected. Another serious blow to the
- British was the exceptionally poor communications
- between their ships.
-
- at the end of the battle:
-
- The British lost fourteen ships of 111,000 tons
- total and 6,784 men. The Germans lost eleven ships
- of 62,000 tons total and 3,058 men.
-
- For the British, the outcome could be seen as giving
- a tactical loss but a strategic gain. The Germans
- left the field, the British remained and were ready
- to continue the next day
-


Yes, it was a British victory, but as you said, a strategic one. The Royal Navy lost more men and ships than the German High Seas Fleet, but the victory lay in the fact that the German fleet never came out en masse again, until the journey to Scapa Flow after the Armistice. They did not threaten Britain's dominance of the North Sea ever again.
Cheers!



<CENTER>


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Ladies & gentlemen, this is the captain speaking. Thankyou for choosing to fly Mandarin Airlines. Those passengers sitting on the left-hand side of the aeroplane please make yourselves comfortable. Those sitting on the right... please look to your left!

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 06:12 PM
Boandlgramer wrote:
- was it a british victory ?
-
-
-

Yes, a British victory because the Germans returned to port, never to sail again, except to captivety.

A good book on Jutland is "Jutland: An Analysis of the fighting" by John Campbell ISBN 0-87021-324-5


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"Only a dead 'chamber pot' is a good 'chamber pot'!"

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 06:25 PM
You might want to put this request over in Oleg's Ready Room. I think he has someone keeping up with that forum more so than this one. S!

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 06:36 PM
Striker-PBNA wrote:
- You might want to put this request over in Oleg's
- Ready Room. I think he has someone keeping up with
- that forum more so than this one. S!
-
-

Not really much point in posting it over there. A depot ship at Scapa Flow used as an anti aircraft position. It's not relevant to BoB, but was still a great ship once.
Cheers!

<CENTER>


<IMG SRC="http://www.apqa16.dsl.pipex.com/airplane1.3.jpg"


Ladies & gentlemen, this is the captain speaking. Thankyou for choosing to fly Mandarin Airlines. Those passengers sitting on the left-hand side of the aeroplane please make yourselves comfortable. Those sitting on the right... please look to your left!

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 07:08 PM
MiloMorai wrote:
-
- Boandlgramer wrote:
-- was it a british victory ?
--
--
-
- Yes, a British victory because the Germans returned
- to port, never to sail again, except to captivety.
-
- A good book on Jutland is "Jutland: An Analysis of
- the fighting" by John Campbell ISBN 0-87021-324-5



Campbell is probably the finest single secondary source on Jutland - a "must have" on any WW1 naval enthusiast's bookshelf.

Another excellent companion book is - JUTLAND: THE GERMAN PERSPECTIVE. by Tarrant. I highly recommend it.



Blutarski

XyZspineZyX
10-20-2003, 07:18 PM
The last surviving WW1 BB that was with the British fleet at Jutland was the HMS Canada. In 1920 she was re-purchased by Chile and named Almirante Latorre. In 1959 she went to Japan for scrapping.

http://www.warships1.com/BRbb10_Canada-LD1.jpg

http://www.warships1.com/BRbb10_Canada-LD2.jpg


http://www.warships1.com/BRbb10_Canada_strbrdfrt.jpg


http://community.webshots.com/s/image6/8/13/63/80181363JFVAck_ph.jpg


The other ship of the class was converted to an a/c carrier, the HMS Eagle

http://www.warships1.com/BRbb10_Eagle_prtfrt.jpg




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"Only a dead 'chamber pot' is a good 'chamber pot'!"