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View Full Version : Please Vote for your favorite Culture Warrior that Ubisoft should develop in future.



Strabun
07-26-2017, 03:45 PM
Greetings Community !

I wonder who do you think is the most powerfull warrior culture that existed in our medieval and ancient history.


1: Ahir or Aheer is an Indian ethnic group, members of which identify as being of the Yadav community because they consider the two terms to be synonymous.The Ahirs are variously described as a caste, a clan, a community, a race and a tribe. They ruled over different parts of India and Nepal.
The traditional occupation of Ahirs is cow-herding and agriculture. They are found throughout India but are particularly concentrated in the northern areas. They are known by numerous other names, including Gaoli Ghosi in the north and Gaddi if converted to Islam. Some in the Bundelkhand region of Uttar Pradesh are known as Dauwa.

2: Akinji or akindji (Turkish: akıncı, IPA: [ɑkɯnˈdʒɯ]; literally, "raider", plural: akıncılar) were irregular light cavalry, scout divisions (deli) and advance troops of the Ottoman Empire's military. When the pre-existing Turkish ghazis were incorporated into the Ottoman Empire's military they became known as "akıncı." They were one of the first divisions to face the opposing military and were known for their prowess in battle. Unpaid they lived and operated as raiders on the frontiers of the Ottoman Empire, subsisting totally on plunder. There is a distinction made between "akıncı" and "deli" cavalry.

3: AnṣÔr ( meaning Raiders, or patrons) refer to a class of warriors who are renowned for their arsenal of weapons and for their speed and mobility on the battlefield. The quality of the Arabian horses quickly led to these soldiers dominating the battlefield, making ample use of their array of weaponry, which consisted of javelins, a sword, and bow and arrows. The one military unit that was present in nearly all of the Arabic expansion of the 7th to 9th centuries was the AnṣÔr Warrior. These warriors participated as infantry, but most commonly rode on horseback and were famed to be the greatest horsemen/infantry of their time.

4: Armatoloi were Christian Greek irregular soldiers, or militia, commissioned by the Ottomans to enforce the Sultan's authority within an administrative district called an were created in areas of Greece that had high levels of brigandage , or in regions that were difficult for Ottoman authorities to govern due to the inaccessible terrain, such as the Agrafa mountains of Thessaly, where the first armatoliki was established in the 15th century. Over time, the roles of the armatoloi and klephtes became blurred, with both reversing their roles and allegiances as the situation demanded, all the while maintaining the delicate status-quo with the Ottoman authorities.
During the Greek War of Independence, the armatoloi, along with the klephts, formed the nucleus of the Greek fighting forces, and played a prominent part throughout its duration. Yannis Makriyannis referred to the armatoloi and klephts as the "yeast of liberty"

5: Highlanders was a Scottish regiment is any regiment (or similar military unit) that at some time in its history has or had a name that referred to Scotland or some part, thereof, and adopted items of Scottish dress. These regiments were and are usually a product of the British Empire, either directly serving the United Kingdom, serving as colonial troops, or later as part of Commonwealth country military establishments. Their "Scottishness" is no longer necessarily due to recruitment in Scotland nor any proportion of members of Scottish ancestry. Traditionally, Scottish regiments cultivate a reputation of exceptional fierceness in combat and are often given romantic portrayals in popular media. Within Scotland, itself, regiments of the Scottish Lowlands did not adopt as strong a "Scottish" (specifically Highland Scottish) character until the late Victorian Era.

6: Immortals was the name given by Herodotus to an elite heavily-armed infantry unit of 10,000 soldiers in the army of the Achaemenid Empire. This force performed the dual roles of both Imperial Guard and standing army. The force consisted mainly of Persians, but also included Medes and Elamites. Essential questions regarding the unit (even its native name) remain unanswered, because authentic sources are missing.

7: Hussar was a member of any one of several types of light cavalry used during the 18th and 19th centuries, beginning in Central Europe.
Historically, the term derives from the cavalry of late medieval Hungary, under Matthias Corvinus.[2] The title and distinctive dress of these horsemen were subsequently widely adopted by light cavalry regiments in European and European colonial armies in the late 17th and 18th centuries. A number of armored or ceremonial mounted units in modern armies retain the designation of hussars.

8: Youxia was a type of ancient Chinese folk hero celebrated in classical Chinese poetry and fictional literature. It literally means "wandering vigilante", but is commonly translated as "knight-errant" or less commonly as "cavalier", "adventurer", "soldier of fortune" or "underworld stalwart".

9: Jaguar were a type of Aztec warrior called which derives from the eagle warrior and the Jaguar Warrior. They were an elite military unit similar to the eagle warriors.The jaguar motif was used due to the belief that the jaguar represented Tezcatlipoca, god of the night sky. Aztecs also wore these dresses at war because they believed the animal's strengths would be given to them during battles.[citation needed] Jaguar warriors were used at the battlefront in military campaigns. They were also used to capture prisoners for sacrifice to the Aztec gods. Many statues and images (in pre-Columbian and post-Columbian codices) of these warriors have survived.[4] They fought with a wooden sword studded with obsidian volcanic glass blades, called a macuahuitl. They also used spears and atlatls.
To become a jaguar warrior, a member of the Aztec army had to capture twelve enemies during two consecutive battles. This was said to honor their gods in a way far greater than killing enemy soldiers in the battlefield. For a warrior to kill an enemy was considered clumsy.

10: Impi is a Zulu word for any armed body of men. However, in English it is often used to refer to a Zulu regiment, which is called an ibutho in Zulu. Its beginnings lie far back in historic tribal warfare customs, when groups of armed men called impis battled. They were systematised radically by the Zulu king Shaka, who was then only the exiled illegitimate son of king Senzangakhona, but already showing much prowess as a general in the army of Mthethwa king Dingiswayo in the Mthethwa-Ndwandwe war in the early 1810s.

PAZUZU16
07-26-2017, 10:37 PM
I love the idea but you would have to pick a culture that used armor.

kweassa1
07-26-2017, 10:57 PM
I love the idea but you would have to pick a culture that used armor.

Then how do you explain the devs taking armor pieces away from the Vikings and basically making them look like neolithic-era cavemen? :D :D :D

SikanderAzam
07-26-2017, 11:02 PM
Then how do you explain the devs taking armor pieces away from the Vikings and basically making them look like neolithic-era cavemen? :D :D :D

I don't understand why you'd need armor in the first place. There are tons of historical warriors that used either very light or sometimes no armour. The toughest part would be figuring out how to fit them into the narrow three factions that exist.

kweassa1
07-26-2017, 11:17 PM
I don't understand why you'd need armor in the first place. There are tons of historical warriors that used either very light or sometimes no armour. The toughest part would be figuring out how to fit them into the narrow three factions that exist.

Not tough at all.

C'mon, you know how they handle these sort of situations in game scenarios... cook up a new DLC and slap on the intro narration that goes... "One fateful day, a new band of invaders have landed on the coast and set up a new bad-arse faction and... "

UbiNoty
07-26-2017, 11:43 PM
I don't think it has to be limited by armor.
And we've said previously that they don't necessarily have to be strictly canon in terms of the 3 factions. It's an alternate universe, so it doesn't have to adhere to history as we know it.
Personally, I'd love to see us tie in some warriors of other factions than strictly (knights, vikings, samurai) into the lore.

SikanderAzam
07-27-2017, 02:04 AM
Not tough at all.

C'mon, you know how they handle these sort of situations in game scenarios... cook up a new DLC and slap on the intro narration that goes... "One fateful day, a new band of invaders have landed on the coast and set up a new bad-arse faction and... "

You posted something that didn't start with "disagree?" Getting lazy and only including bold text in our critiques, are we?

SikanderAzam
07-27-2017, 02:05 AM
It's an alternate universe, so it doesn't have to adhere to history as we know it.

Klingon Bat'leth warrior for Vikings, p10x.

RenegadeRasta
07-27-2017, 02:13 AM
I don't see Amazons on that list, bro.

BudgetParrot118
07-27-2017, 04:07 AM
Cloud people of Peru....no skin color changes as their identity in that region relied on their segregation from Aztecs and other tribes.

"Ain't I a stinker?"

Person looks this up- (white people in pre colonial Americas?wtf)

BudgetParrot118
07-27-2017, 04:31 AM
Expand upon the norsemen with the due, varangian, saxons, jutes, Danes, slavs. They all had distinct looks from armor to weapons.

The Vendel era is the most interesting. That era is what gave birth to viking look and armor as we know it today. The armor was,ornate as well. Lots of gold plating.

Also the norsemen had plenty of armor from chainmail, Gambesons, leather tunics, lamelar armor/lamae.

CandleInTheDark
07-28-2017, 12:50 PM
Thinking about this, I realised that the game map hits pretty much every point on the fantasy map drinking game >.> lol

The West -The hub of civilisation, depending on the development you will find the Court here, or knights, usually warriors are dressed in tin cans, big bustling city, big library, the residents would say where the civilised folk live.

The North - Cold, ice, savages, barbarians, tribal, wearing furs and pelts, big emphasis on meat where cooking is optional.

The East - This is where the ninjas live, d'uh. Fish, noodles, tea ceremonies, caste system so the samurai live here too, generally armoured in robes or leather.

So if they ever do a southern faction,I am quite willing to bet it falls into...

The South - Deserts, spices and curries, curved swords or spears, turbans and flowy clothing, damn hot all in all.

Draghmar
07-28-2017, 01:00 PM
The South - Deserts, spices and curries, curved swords or spears, turbans and flowy clothing, damn hot all in all.
Give me curved swords! (called sabers in some regions) :D

kweassa1
07-28-2017, 01:18 PM
So if they ever do a southern faction,I am quite willing to bet it falls into...

The South - Deserts, spices and curries, curved swords or spears, turbans and flowy clothing, damn hot all in all.

Really? I thought if the South is ever done, it was darn surely be going to be these guys...:D :D :D

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/19/67/ec/1967ecf2dbabe2076b83cdf5d0618d7b--nd-amendment-gun-control.jpg

CandleInTheDark
07-28-2017, 01:29 PM
Really? I thought if the South is ever done, it was darn surely be going to be these guys...:D :D :D

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/19/67/ec/1967ecf2dbabe2076b83cdf5d0618d7b--nd-amendment-gun-control.jpg

Lol >.> the normal fantasy trope is deserts, looking at places like Faerun, Midgard (god their regional books are pretty much exactly what I said) and I believe Golarion, not sure about the south, Faerun was always more my setting for D&D and I converted stuff from there for Pathfinder where Golarion is their supported world, but I could see that as well.