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View Full Version : 10000 meters in an uncompressed cockpit!



Urist
02-03-2004, 11:27 PM
It might add a bit of realism to the game if you climbed with a bit of haste you would go slowly deaf until you hit the "Pop ears" button...

My god, how the hell did they fly that high.. I found it painfull enough flying a cessna to a whole 8000 feet let alone 30000. Desending was especially fun. I got used to it I guess but it was still only a slow dive from 8000 feet, not the "I need to get the hell out of here now or I'll die" dive from 30000 feet being chased by an angry P51.

Must have been one hell of miserable experience that one.

Were bleeding ears a common occurance? Am I making a big deal out of it and pilots didn't have a problem with it? A proper regimen of chewing and popping ear drums could deal with an emergency dive from altitude. Or was it really a nightmare and the pilots with pressurized cockpits were more apt to dive their planes to escape then ones without?

Did the P47 have a pressurized cockpit? If it didn't well, that must have been fun. If it did, if you were flying a 109G6 why the hell would you want to follow a P47 that just went into a steep dive when your head is going to implode if you try and follow it?

blah...

Urist
02-03-2004, 11:27 PM
It might add a bit of realism to the game if you climbed with a bit of haste you would go slowly deaf until you hit the "Pop ears" button...

My god, how the hell did they fly that high.. I found it painfull enough flying a cessna to a whole 8000 feet let alone 30000. Desending was especially fun. I got used to it I guess but it was still only a slow dive from 8000 feet, not the "I need to get the hell out of here now or I'll die" dive from 30000 feet being chased by an angry P51.

Must have been one hell of miserable experience that one.

Were bleeding ears a common occurance? Am I making a big deal out of it and pilots didn't have a problem with it? A proper regimen of chewing and popping ear drums could deal with an emergency dive from altitude. Or was it really a nightmare and the pilots with pressurized cockpits were more apt to dive their planes to escape then ones without?

Did the P47 have a pressurized cockpit? If it didn't well, that must have been fun. If it did, if you were flying a 109G6 why the hell would you want to follow a P47 that just went into a steep dive when your head is going to implode if you try and follow it?

blah...

ElektroFredrik
02-04-2004, 12:41 AM
I think screaming while diving help ease the pressure.
IIRC in the memoirs of Assar Svensson (test pilot for SWAF)
he writes that when doing dive-tests for the J22
he'd scream in the dive...
Also, in old footage of artillery people you can see
them with their mouths open as they fire their big guns.
Something like this: load gun, close breech, hands over ears,
mouth open, fire. Repeat.

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pourshot
02-04-2004, 12:44 AM
Having your mouth open keeps the air pressure even so your eardrum's wont burst.

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xTHRUDx
02-04-2004, 12:57 AM
chewing gum

CH_D-Fender
02-04-2004, 03:23 AM
With the Me-163 "Kraftei" (power egg) they
climbed to 13'000 meters in 3 Minutes. No
pressurized cockpit either.

ST__Pawnee
02-04-2004, 03:37 AM
10 000 meters is no problem. The world glider altitude record (no pressurized cockpit) is 14 000 meters. But that's almost how high you can go before your blood starts to boil.... ouch, gotta hurt