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Giganoni
05-18-2004, 03:33 AM
I was a little bored, so thought I'd type something about an interesting ace, and figured if other people had an ace of the PTO they liked, they could put their story in this thread too. Anyway, here is my interesting ace.

This will be taken word for word from an excellent book called Japanese Army Air Force Fighter Units and Their Aces by Hata Ikuhiko and Izawa Yasuho. Translated by Christopher Shores, Page 199

"Hinoki Yohei"

"Born in 1919 in Tokushima Prefecture, Hinoki graduated from the 53rd intake of the Army Flying Military Academy in June 1940, together with Nakakazu Ozaki and Kiyoshi Namai. He joined the 64th Sentai at Dongjingcheng in November 1940, where he receieved intensive training from Capt Iori Sakai, the 2nd chutai leader. In February 1941 the unit moved to Canton, and from December participated in the fighting over South-East Asia. Hinoki's first combat occurred over Sungei Patani, Malaya, on 8 December when he shared in the destruction of a Blenheim with a wingman. On 25 December he claimed a Buffalo over Rangoon, while on 31 January 1942 he added two Hurricanes over Singapore."

"After operations over Sumatra and Java, the unit moved to the Burma front, where on 10 April his Ki 43 was hit 21 times over Loiwing and he was wounded. Although thinking at first that he could not get back and must die, he managed to reach base and was hospitalized for a month. In October 1942 he went back to Akeno on a commander's course, returning to the Sentai in March 1943 to lead the 3rd chutai."

"His claims built up steadily and on the 25 November 1943 he claimed the first P-51 over Burma, Col Milton, commanding officer of the 311th Fighter-Bomber Group, who became a POW. Two days later Hinoki intercepted an estimated 50 B-24s and 30 plus escorting fighters, claiming a P-51, a P-38 and a B-24. However, he was hit from below by a P-51 whilst attacking another B-24 and was severly wounded, although again he managed to land. His right leg was amputated and he was repatriated to Japan."

"Here from November 1944 he trained the 57th intake of graduate and foreign students from Burma at the Takamatsu Branch School of the Akeno Flying School. In April 1945 he moved to Akeno, becoming 2nd Daitai commander of the Akeno Training Flying Division: with this unit he took part in several interceptions. On 16 July over Ise he claimed a P-51 shot down for his 12th victory, closing to 20 meters during his attack. The unit then moved to Miki, and he ended the war with the 111th Sentai."

Phew, he just had a lot of "Fighting Spirit" to me. Fighting while missing part of your right leg mustn't have been fun. Although I'm sure other pilots flew with similar injuries. Still, wounded twice and kept on going. Oh and his 12th victory was in the Ki100 the Goshikisen.

Post any other ace stories of any other nation if ya wish.

Giganoni
05-18-2004, 03:33 AM
I was a little bored, so thought I'd type something about an interesting ace, and figured if other people had an ace of the PTO they liked, they could put their story in this thread too. Anyway, here is my interesting ace.

This will be taken word for word from an excellent book called Japanese Army Air Force Fighter Units and Their Aces by Hata Ikuhiko and Izawa Yasuho. Translated by Christopher Shores, Page 199

"Hinoki Yohei"

"Born in 1919 in Tokushima Prefecture, Hinoki graduated from the 53rd intake of the Army Flying Military Academy in June 1940, together with Nakakazu Ozaki and Kiyoshi Namai. He joined the 64th Sentai at Dongjingcheng in November 1940, where he receieved intensive training from Capt Iori Sakai, the 2nd chutai leader. In February 1941 the unit moved to Canton, and from December participated in the fighting over South-East Asia. Hinoki's first combat occurred over Sungei Patani, Malaya, on 8 December when he shared in the destruction of a Blenheim with a wingman. On 25 December he claimed a Buffalo over Rangoon, while on 31 January 1942 he added two Hurricanes over Singapore."

"After operations over Sumatra and Java, the unit moved to the Burma front, where on 10 April his Ki 43 was hit 21 times over Loiwing and he was wounded. Although thinking at first that he could not get back and must die, he managed to reach base and was hospitalized for a month. In October 1942 he went back to Akeno on a commander's course, returning to the Sentai in March 1943 to lead the 3rd chutai."

"His claims built up steadily and on the 25 November 1943 he claimed the first P-51 over Burma, Col Milton, commanding officer of the 311th Fighter-Bomber Group, who became a POW. Two days later Hinoki intercepted an estimated 50 B-24s and 30 plus escorting fighters, claiming a P-51, a P-38 and a B-24. However, he was hit from below by a P-51 whilst attacking another B-24 and was severly wounded, although again he managed to land. His right leg was amputated and he was repatriated to Japan."

"Here from November 1944 he trained the 57th intake of graduate and foreign students from Burma at the Takamatsu Branch School of the Akeno Flying School. In April 1945 he moved to Akeno, becoming 2nd Daitai commander of the Akeno Training Flying Division: with this unit he took part in several interceptions. On 16 July over Ise he claimed a P-51 shot down for his 12th victory, closing to 20 meters during his attack. The unit then moved to Miki, and he ended the war with the 111th Sentai."

Phew, he just had a lot of "Fighting Spirit" to me. Fighting while missing part of your right leg mustn't have been fun. Although I'm sure other pilots flew with similar injuries. Still, wounded twice and kept on going. Oh and his 12th victory was in the Ki100 the Goshikisen.

Post any other ace stories of any other nation if ya wish.

matkal80
05-18-2004, 04:21 AM
I am bored too, so i will write some words as well, not exactly on topic.
I've read some great japanesse wartime memories like Saburo Sakai "Samurai" and Tamaguchi Haga "Destroeyer Captain" and what i found extraemly interesting is the description of their hard training camp, sometimes filled with cruelty punishment.
I also read a fiction book by polish author Bohdan Arct called "Kamikaze", where most of the action takes place during such training at the end of war, showing young wannaba pilot who is trained to be a navy pilot, and after that he joins kamikaze unit. It is a great book that show the treatment of cadets in Japanese army

PlaneEater
05-18-2004, 05:02 AM
I dunno... once you learn to fly with a prosthetic, I wonder if not having legs is an advantage (I've heard it was for Douglas Bader).

No legs, more Gs. More Gs, more one-legged-***-kicking. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Korolov
05-18-2004, 01:01 PM
Daniel T. Roberts
80th FS/8th FG
432nd & 433rd FS/475th FG
15 Victories

A music teacher before the war, Roberts flew P-39's with the 80th FS. His first two victories came with this plane. By 1943, he had been transferred to the 475th to fly P-38s. He never drank or cursed, and was very popular with those under his command. While the previous commander of the 433rd FS was considered very poor, Roberts was a godsend. Before a mission, P-38s would be lined up wingtip to wingtip. Roberts would leave the ops shack early enough for him to walk the entire line. He made it a point to talk with every man he met along the way. He always tried to show appreciation for the crew chief's work on the planes.

Roberts made a point to the squadron that they had to work as a team, and that the enlisted men were the backbone of the outfit. During missions, Roberts primary concern was the squadron, and not personal score. He managed to get 15 enemy fighters without a scratch in his P-38. The pilots openly stated they would willingly follow Capt. Roberts even if he were headed directly for a solid wall.

It was during a escort mission on November 9, 1943 that Roberts died. Chasing a Zeke out of 20 enemy planes, the Zeke made a sharp turn and Roberts swung to follow him. His wingman, Dale Myers, not expecting this move, crashed into Roberts. Both pilots were dead instantly as their P-38s exploded midair.

When the rest of the squadron got back home, hardly anyone could believe the news. Many men openly wept at the loss of their beloved commander.

Popular with his men, kind and gentle, and a damn good pilot. One of the best aces in the 475th FG.

http://www.mechmodels.com/images/newsig1.jpg

Giganoni
05-18-2004, 07:05 PM
That is a good story, its pretty sad hearing about flight leaders that die. Must have been really hard on the men.

LW_lcarp
05-18-2004, 07:30 PM
http://www.acepilots.com/usaaf_bong.html

"If winning isnt everything why do they keep score"
Vince Lombardi

Giganoni
05-22-2004, 04:45 PM
Okay, I know on these forums there are a lot of people who want to fly the Ki-61, even if they don't like Japanese planes, they want to fly this plane so I'd thought I'd copy the summary of a Ki-61 ace. Again taken from my previous source, page 263-264.

"Takeuchi, Shogo"

"Shogo Takeuchi was born in Kyoto Prefecture in 1918, subsequently graduating from the Army Flying Military Academy with the 52nd entry of cadets in September 1939. He showed early promise as a fighter pilot, possessing both courage and good marksmanship. He served with the 3rd chutai of the 64th Sentai, taking part in the opening phases of the Pacific War under the guidance of Lt Col Tateo Kato and Capt Katsumi Anma. On 31 January 1942 over Singapore he engaged Hurricanes which were attempting to intercept Japanese bombers, claiming three shot down in quick succession to the astonishment of his commanding officer."

"In April 1942 he was transferred to the newly formed 68th Sentai, and in December was promoted to the command of the 2nd chutai.In April 1943 the unit moved to eastern New Guinea, but suffered many problems with its new Ki 61 fighters. On one occasion Takeuchi escorted bombers to their target on his own after all the rest of the Ki 61 pilots were obliged to abort due to various technical troubles. On 20 July he made the first claim for a B-24 to be achieved by a Ki 61. Despite the adverse conditions in New Guinea, with many senior pilots being shot down and killed, or falling victims to tropical diseases, he continued to lead missions, on occasion acting as commander for the whole Hikodan."

"During this period his total of successes rose steadily. He was hit and wounded during an interception in October 1943, but after 15 days was back, although far from recovered, flying with his body swathed in bandages. He was by now considered to be the hero of Wewak, where morale had fast been declining, and when he taxied out in his Ki 61, carrying 58 red eagle victory marks beneath the cockpit, even the ground forces cheered. (These 58 victory marks appear to have indicated his total claims, destroyed, probables and damaged.)"

"By December 1943 there were only three officer pilots left in the 68th Sentai. On 21st, during an escort to light bombers raiding Arawe, he shot down a Grumman fighter which was attempting to attack Maj Kiyoshi Kimura, the Sentai commander. He was then seen to break away and head for Hansa, but just before landing his engine cut and his aircraft overturned on hitting some trees; he died three hours later. Maj Kimura wrote to his family, advising that he had flown some 90 sorties during his six months in New Guinea, and had claimed 16 shot down and probably at least ten more, to add to the 30 destroyed and damaged he had claimed with the 64th Sentai. His total of aircraft destroyed was therefore in excess of 19. At the time of his death an individual citation was proposed, but was never actually to materialise."

I think an interesting pilot, should put him in PF when your around New Guinea.