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Baltar
02-19-2004, 04:12 PM
I was talking to a friend recently about the Avro Arrow, and it dawned on me that Avro was the manufacturer of the Lancaster--which was a British plane, not Canadian (nearest I could tell). Also I remember seeing recently that De Havilland is now based in Canada...again strange since I seem to remember De Havilland planes, like the mosquito, listed as British planes during the war...

Anyways, just got me thinking: What happened to all the major aircraft manufacturers after the war? Anyone know any good resources on this, or are willing to share their knowledge? Thanks.

Baltar
02-19-2004, 04:12 PM
I was talking to a friend recently about the Avro Arrow, and it dawned on me that Avro was the manufacturer of the Lancaster--which was a British plane, not Canadian (nearest I could tell). Also I remember seeing recently that De Havilland is now based in Canada...again strange since I seem to remember De Havilland planes, like the mosquito, listed as British planes during the war...

Anyways, just got me thinking: What happened to all the major aircraft manufacturers after the war? Anyone know any good resources on this, or are willing to share their knowledge? Thanks.

Korolov
02-19-2004, 04:18 PM
Times change; in most cases the companies didn't do too well in the post war years, and were bought out by the ones that were doing well.

Northrop/Grumman is a good example of this; a few years back Northrop bought Grumman, and Boeing has been buying a lot of companies (McDonnel Douglas, etc.)

http://www.mechmodels.com/images/newsig1.jpg

A.K.Davis
02-19-2004, 04:23 PM
Here's one I know:

Consolidated + Vultee = Convair --> General Dynamics --> Lockheed

--AKD

http://www.flyingpug.com/pugline2.jpg

purzel08
02-19-2004, 04:25 PM
I have a hot-water tank from Junkers http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Greetings...

C_FA
02-19-2004, 04:28 PM
In March 1967, North American merged with Rockwell Standard Corporation, becoming North American Rockwell (NAR).
In 1970, NAR won the contract for the B-1 bomber over Boeing and General Dynamics.

Rockwell had formed the Space Transportation Systems Division (STSD) and delivered four Shuttle orbiters. The first Shuttle flight took place on April 14, 1981. After the Challenger was lost in January 1986, Rockwell received the contract for the Endeavour replacement orbiter.

In 1996, Rockwell's space systems, aircraft divisions, Rocketdyne, and other units joined the Boeing.

Chuck_Older
02-19-2004, 04:36 PM
C_FA, I can see how you have had some type of dealings with The Boeing Company http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

*****************************
from the Hundred Years war to the Crimea, from the lance and the musket and the Roman spear, to all of the men who have stood with no fear, in the service of the King~ Clash

Taylortony
02-19-2004, 04:46 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Baltar:
I was talking to a friend recently about the Avro Arrow, and it dawned on me that Avro was the manufacturer of the Lancaster--which was a British plane, not Canadian (nearest I could tell). Also I remember seeing recently that De Havilland is now based in Canada...again strange since I seem to remember De Havilland planes, like the mosquito, listed as British planes during the war...

Anyways, just got me thinking: What happened to all the major aircraft manufacturers after the war? Anyone know any good resources on this, or are willing to share their knowledge? Thanks.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

De Havilland was a uk company but they set up De Havilland Canada as an off shoot to produce aircraft during the war, later on the parent company was merged down to form Bae or British Aerospace, similar things happened with Avro... Most of the famous uk Manufactures were merged, often against there will by the governemt into British Aerospace, and the engine manufactures were merged with Rolls Royce, you just got to look at the Hawker business jet by Raytheon or "Beech" that started life as the Hawker Siddley 125 A merger of 2 famous names, then became the the Bae 125 before Raytheon bought the design rights.

C_FA
02-19-2004, 04:49 PM
Not sure what you mean there chuck? I just fly`em not build them.

The other gent was asking about aircraft companies.
North American has alot of history at making some great aircraft.

XyZspineZyX
02-19-2004, 04:57 PM
Some of us may be DRIVING CARS made from the same companies that brought you Messerschmitts, Focke Wulfs (Daimler Benz ring a bell with the 109 engine? BMW for FW190s?) and even Zeros (Mitsubishi). If you're into your coffee and household appliances, and have a Krupp machine, check and see if bits from a Panzer got through the filter...

Bristolboy
02-19-2004, 04:58 PM
in Britain there were a number of mergers ie Hawker with Armstrong Siddeley to form Hawker Siddeley. After the war Avro built the Vulcan, Vickers designed the Valiant and Handley Page the Victor. Eventually they were merged and nationalised to become British Aircraft Corporation(BAC) which later became British Aerospace.This is now part of Airbus Industries.

Companies like Bristol disappeared into this conglomerate although they still use the Filton site in Bristol. The Brabazon was built there and of course Concorde which completed its final flight there a few months ago.

Capt._Tenneal
02-19-2004, 06:15 PM
Good question !

It seems much easier following the postwar fates of the Soviet, now Russian companies. MiGs, of course, but also Ilyushins, Yakovlevs, Antonovs (the TB3 also known as the ANT-6) are still with us. Polikarpov and Lavoichkin are gone, replaced by Sukhoi, Myaschisev, Tupolev, etc.

Messerschmitt made (are still making ?) helicopters awhile back as the MBB (Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm) firm. And Mitsubishi went back to making aircraft with the F1 Japanese fighter.

Does anyone know of the fates of Supermarine, Republic, Bell (are they Bell helicopters now ?), Curtiss, Consolidated, etc. ?

Chuck_Older
02-19-2004, 06:23 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by C_FA:
Not sure what you mean there chuck? I just fly`em not build them.


QUOTE]

When you said, "The Boeing" I couldn't help but laugh a little, since they really really prefer to be called The Boeing Company. I always think of it in capital letters or bold face. It's as if calling them just "Boeing" is an insult, they want you to say and write, "The Boeing Company". I figured since you wrote, "The Boeing" it was second nature to you to not just type "Boeing".

*****************************
from the Hundred Years war to the Crimea, from the lance and the musket and the Roman spear, to all of the men who have stood with no fear, in the service of the King~ Clash

PlaneEater
02-19-2004, 08:42 PM
Lesee... WWII aircraft manufacturers (the ones I remember anyway) and where they are today:

Boeing is obviously still around.

Douglas (C-47, DC-3) merged with McDonnel (XP-67) and became McDonnel-Douglas, and got eaten by Boeing.

Seversky (P-35, P-43) became Republic (P-47). I believe they merged with Fairchild (lots of trainer aircraft) somewhere along the way. The F-105 Thunderchief was their work, as is the A-10 Thunderbolt. Basically, any plane named 'Thunder-something' is them.

Lockheed (P-38) merged with Martin (B-26), thus Lockheed-Martin. They got eaten by Boeing. I THINK the 'Martin' half of 'Martin-Baker' is a different Martin. Martin-Baker makes most modern aircraft's ejection seats. They tried making a plane--the MB.5--near the end of WWII, but, thankfully for every jet pilot who's had to pull the loud handle, it wasn't a success.

Consolidated (B-24) merged with Vultee (BT-13) and became Consolidated-Vultee, which became Convair, which got eaten by General Dynamics, which got eaten by Lockheed.

Vought (F4U) is still around. I think they do aircraft components instead of full planes, though.

Bell (P-39) makes helicopters. Lots of helicopters. Bell Jetranger, Bell AH-1G, Bell If-it-has-rotors-we-prolly-made-it.

Hughes (F2G--involved with the Corsair) got eaten by, I believe, Boeing.

Northrop (P-61) merged with Grumman (F4F). Boeing ate them.

North American (P-51) merged with Rockwell. Boeing ate them.

Curtiss (P-40), sadly, went out of business not too long after WWII.

Brewster (B-239) couldn't get their act together, and was taken over by the British navy towards the end of the war. The facility became the Naval Air Modificaton unit, went through a few evolutions, and eventually closed in '96.

Messerschmitt (Me/Bf-109) got pretty dismantled by the end of the war. Willy Messerschmitt restarted the company post-war doing prefabricated houses and other consumer stuff. Around 1968, we got Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH

Focke-Wulf (Fw-190) basically ceased to be at the end of the war, when Kurt Tank went to Argentina. Flugwerks (GmbH Germany) is manufacturing new Fw-190s for the private sector in kit form, based off the old blueprints. I'm not sure if they're an actual resurrection of Focke-Wulf or not.

Blohm und Voss (Bv-222)--not sure about Voss. The Blohm half survived to form the Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH conglomerate, though.

Junkers (Ju-87, Ju-88) / Jumo aircraft company was actually state-controlled, having been foricbly ripped from the hands of Hugo Junkers in 1933-34. As far as being an aircraft deisgn and manufacturing company, I believe it died with the Reich.

Heinkel (He-111) stayed alive post-war doing bicycles and motorcycles. They went back to aircraft, building foreign licenses, in 1955. They became a division of the VFW corporation in 1965, and Heinkel Aircraft ceased to exist as a corporation.

Mitsubishi (A6M series) turned to electronics and cars post-war.

Nakajima (N1K), Kawanishi (Ki-43, Ki-84)--not sure.


ENGINES...

Jumo was actually a branch of the Junkers corporation.

Daimler-Benz (DB-602, DB-605) is now Dailmer-Chrystler and Mercedes-Benz.

BMW (BMW-801) makes cars now. :P

More later...

Lasst das Hollentor offen,
Es FRIERT HIER OBEN!

tower.1963
02-19-2004, 10:44 PM
supermarine became part of the vickers group.as explained above the british plane manufacturers were force to merger into two companies,hawker group and BAC,or go to wall like handley page .useful resource are the putnam range of books,which cronicle aircraft types produced and fates of respective companies

Dunkelgrun
02-20-2004, 03:14 AM
I seem to remember there being a 3-wheeled Messerschmitt 'bubble car' in the 60s. Anyone know any more about it?
Cheers!

http://www.uploadit.org/igmusapa/tft2.jpg
www.nightbomber.com (http://www.nightbomber.com)

HansKnappstick
02-20-2004, 03:41 AM
BMW was not only aircraft engine company; they were also producing motorcycles in the 30s. Thus we can say they they didn't change their profile that much.

Dornier (Do-17 "flying pencil", Do-217 from the Dieppe raid repulsion) was merged with the Dassault company (when???) and kept on producing airplanes (small private and line aircraft). It went bankrupt last year, sadly.

SkyMonkey2
02-20-2004, 04:19 AM
This is something a friend of mine made, it's more partial to space companies becuase that's where he works but has some of the early mergers plus many of the main areospace companies that exist today. sort of relevent.

http://www.dropby.com/ElGrande/spacehistory.html

hasn't been updated in a while, but still very cool.

resev
02-20-2004, 05:07 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by HansKnappstick:
Dornier (Do-17 "flying pencil", Do-217 from the Dieppe raid repulsion) was merged with the Dassault company (when???) and kept on producing airplanes (small private and line aircraft). It went bankrupt last year, sadly.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Would you call this small and private? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Dassault-Dornier Alphajet
http://www.aviation-top-pics.com/images/Alphajet-K-01.jpg

I didn't knew Dornier had declared bankrupcy.

The Alphajet is one of my favorite aircrafts.

http://mysite.freeserve.com/resev/images/2-picture2.gif?0.3524929147671928

masamainio
02-20-2004, 05:21 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39169000/jpg/_39169836_messerschmitt_300x245_afp.jpg

Only Messerschmitt most of us could ever afford....

HansKnappstick
02-20-2004, 05:32 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by resev:

Would you call this small and private? http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Right, I completely forgot about that one!!!!

Also, I was wrong on another point.
It is Fairchild-Dornier that declared bankrupcy last year, no idea how they are related to Dornier-Dassault. They used to have a factory near Munich.

plumps_
02-20-2004, 05:35 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunkelgrun:
I seem to remember there being a 3-wheeled Messerschmitt 'bubble car' in the 60s. Anyone know any more about it?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

I found this link about the post-war Messerschmitt. (http://www.pcsystems.com/messerschmitt/mess.html) The wings are undermodeled.

-----------------------------------
http://home.arcor.de/rayluck/sturmovik/stulogo-banner.jpg (http://home.arcor.de/rayluck/sturmovik/)

Kampagne für IL-2 1.2: I-16 - Kampf im Kaukasus (Deutsch) (http://home.arcor.de/rayluck/sturmovik/kampagne.html)

JarheadEd
02-20-2004, 05:44 AM
Good info but a bit off. May I make a couple corrections? <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PlaneEater:


Lockheed (P-38) merged with Martin (B-26), thus Lockheed-Martin. They got eaten by Boeing. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Lockheed -Martin is its own company.



<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Vought (F4U) is still around. I think they do aircraft components instead of full planes, though.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Vought merged with Ling-Temco, becoming LTV, then General Dynamics then into Lockheed Martin

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Hughes (F2G--involved with the Corsair) got eaten by, I believe, Boeing.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hughes aircraft was bought by McDonnel Douglas, which is now in Boeing, Not sure about F2G, wasn't that Goodyear?

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Northrop (P-61) merged with Grumman (F4F). Boeing ate them.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Northrop Grumman is its own entity still.

http://img13.photobucket.com/albums/v37/JarheadEd/p40.jpg

BSS_Goat
02-20-2004, 06:49 AM
Northrop Grumman bought Newport News Shipbiulding in Virginia.

Magister__Ludi
02-20-2004, 07:50 AM
Nearly all known ww2 german companies are now part of EADS (company that produces Airbus among other planes). Messerschmitt, Focke-Wulf, Heinkel, Junkers, Dornier became part of DASA, integral part of EADS. You can read more at www.eads.com (http://www.eads.com) site.

One interesting note to this is that at the end of ww2 important engineers from BMW took the plans for BMW 018 and continued the development of the engine as a Swiss company, later aquired by the French state run company SNECMA. Here they produced an uprated version of BMW 018 under name Atar, which will become the powerplant for the very successful French fighter Mirage III.
The other part of BMW aviation engine division made a partnership with Rolls Royce at the beginning of the '90s, and was aquired by RR 10 years later. Now is alive and well producing jet engines.

eiffel68
02-20-2004, 09:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by JarheadEd:
Good info but a bit off. May I make a couple corrections? <BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PlaneEater:


Lockheed (P-38) merged with Martin (B-26), thus Lockheed-Martin. They got eaten by Boeing. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Lockheed -Martin is its own company.



<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Vought (F4U) is still around. I think they do aircraft components instead of full planes, though.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Vought merged with Ling-Temco, becoming LTV, then General Dynamics then into Lockheed Martin

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Hughes (F2G--involved with the Corsair) got eaten by, I believe, Boeing.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Hughes aircraft was bought by McDonnel Douglas, which is now in Boeing, Not sure about F2G, wasn't that Goodyear?

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>
Northrop (P-61) merged with Grumman (F4F). Boeing ate them.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Northrop Grumman is its own entity still.

http://img13.photobucket.com/albums/v37/JarheadEd/p40.jpg <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Vought is not part of LM.
http://www.voughtaircraft.com/about/overview.htm

http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/images/antn45.jpg

Dunkelgrun
02-20-2004, 09:17 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by plumps_:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dunkelgrun:
I seem to remember there being a 3-wheeled Messerschmitt 'bubble car' in the 60s. Anyone know any more about it?
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://www.pcsystems.com/messerschmitt/mess.html The wings are undermodeled.

-----------------------------------
http://home.arcor.de/rayluck/sturmovik/" (http://home.arcor.de/rayluck/sturmovik/)

http://home.arcor.de/rayluck/sturmovik/kampagne.html<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Thanks Plumps, just the job. The KR200 was the one I remembered.
Cheers!

http://www.uploadit.org/igmusapa/tft2.jpg
www.nightbomber.com (http://www.nightbomber.com)

jeroen_R90S
02-20-2004, 09:58 AM
This is what Heinkel made after the war:

http://www.heinkel-club.de/d-frame.htm

BMW (like Zundapp -although it's Janus had 4 wheels) also produced a small bubble-car. (Isetta). The Heinkel design was, ironically, also produced in the UK as Trojan.

BMW started with the expensive V8 501 and six-cylinder 502 cars (next to it's motorcycles, of course) after the war: just the car everyone in a blown-up bankrupt Europe was waiting for and if it hadn't been for the motorcycles and later the Isetta, BMW would have been no more.

All bubble-cars are quite rare (and expensive!) today. Messerschmitt, if I remember correctly, even made a racing version of it's car that is much sought after today as few were made.

BTW & OT: I have a 2 old Hanomag vans, from 1968 and 1971 respectively. Yes, the same Hanomag that produced the famous SdKfz 251/## halftrack... (still looking for one ~if you find one standing in your street or grass, please drop me a mail... http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif)

Hanomag is no more either, part got integrated into Daimler-Benz, part of the holding became Thyssen-Krupp and the last part went to Komatsu.

Oh, and of course, Fokker, after all these years, also went bankrupt in the late 1990s.

Jeroen

PS and yes, that's a BMW bike in my sig... An R90S, the bike that saved BMW again in the seventies after the Japanese invaded the motorcycle market. I have one from 1974; although in better shape that the one in my sig http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Capt._Tenneal
02-20-2004, 10:06 AM
I just realized, and would like to correct my previous post on Soviet companies. They were really Design Bureaus and production of the actual aircraft would be done in State factories. So when I said Migs, etc. I meant the Bureaus.

I also saw a program on Discovery Wings last night that mentioned when the USAF acquired a MiG-15 during the Korean War via a defector, they also acuired a Yak-23 (?) around the same time -- if anyone can print a picture of it, that plane was "F-u-u-u-gly !" No wonder Yak faded into the background and MiG went on to prominence. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

DONB3397
02-20-2004, 10:51 AM
The a/c industry has always been "boom or bust," both military and civilian. Many of the WWII manufacturers grew out of specific AAF contracts, then attempted to build civilian a/c businesses after the war. In the U.S., Boeing was successful. Lockheed, Convair...a few others were reasonably successful. Others went belly-up or merged with other contractors to form new companies.

In Europe and Japan, the technology and remaining plant facilities seems to have been redirected to support post-war rebuilding efforts...hence heavy equipment, appliances and even furniture were produced by the surviving companies. In many cases, the companies became so-called conglomerates or parts of vertical Kuritsus.

Today, there are less than a half-dozen major "defense" contractors in the U.S. -- Lockheed-Martin, Boeing, United Tech, etc. -- who use a large web of subs from other industries to support a/c development and production. If you go back through the linage/history of these organizations, you'll find many of the companies you asked about.

BTW, they are global. That is, they buy components from manufacters and 'subs' in Europe, Japan and elsewhere...and manufacture and sell everywhere. Do you suppose that causes any heartburn in the Pentagon?

Winning isn't everything;
It's the only thing!
http://us.f2.yahoofs.com/bc/3fe77b7e_1812a/bc/Images/Sig---1.jpg?BCbCZNABQ3y1LZQo

Taylortony
02-20-2004, 11:16 AM
BMW was not only aircraft engine company; they were also producing motorcycles in the 30s. Thus we can say they they didn't change their profile that much.

They still are, they produce Aero engines in conjuction with Rolls Royce......... if you didnt know the BMW logo on the cars symbolises a Spinning Prop...

plumps_
02-20-2004, 12:20 PM
Actually BMW was also producing cars before the war. The favourite sports car of the German Luftwaffe pilots was a BMW. Someone in this forum had a painting in his sig showing some FW-190s, pilots, and a BMW cabriolet.

-----------------------------------
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Kampagne für IL-2 1.2: I-16 - Kampf im Kaukasus (Deutsch) (http://home.arcor.de/rayluck/sturmovik/kampagne.html)

MandMs
02-20-2004, 12:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by plumps_:
Actually BMW was also producing cars before the war. The favourite sports car of the German Luftwaffe pilots was a BMW. Someone in this forum had a painting in his sig showing some FW-190s, pilots, and a BMW cabriolet.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Is that not the photo of "Pips" Priller opening the door to his car?

After WW1, BMW made motorcycles to keep the company going. The Versaille Treaty did not allow Germany to construct a/c(military ones, iirc). There was a TV show on BMW motorcycles that went through the company history.



I eat the red ones last.

chris455
02-20-2004, 01:23 PM
Nakajima aircraft &gt; (Icantrecall)Heavy Industries &gt; Subaru Corporation

http://members.cox.net/miataman1/P47.jpg

Capt._Tenneal
02-20-2004, 02:54 PM
On the Italian side, I still see FIAT around (cars, don't know about aircraft). Is Macchi now Aermacchi ?

French : Morane-Saulnier. Dewoitine. Are they still around ?

Menthol_moose
02-20-2004, 04:02 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by ALDEGA:
http://www.junkers.de/ http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Check out the online shop.
Some very nice watches !

http://simpsons.metropoliglobal.com/fotogramas/2f13/09.jpg

Eh, mates! What's the good word?

AlGroover
02-20-2004, 11:16 PM
I believe that 'Aermacchi' is a contraction of 'Aeronautica Macchi'. The motorcycle side of things was sold off to Harley-Davidson around 1970 only to end up back in Italian hands some years later as Cagiva.

WolfOWinter
02-21-2004, 09:19 PM
PlaneEater posted:

Nakajima (N1K), Kawanishi (Ki-43, Ki-84)--not sure.


Know know as Fuji Heavy Industries, the parent company of Subaru (among others). They renamed themselves, IIRC, cause a of stigma caused by treat me of allied prisonors causing them to work thus violating the geneva accords...


Mark

Urist
02-21-2004, 11:09 PM
Kawasaki of course, and Mitsubishi are two japenese companies still using their original names.

Nissan was apparantly building stuff in ww2 and changed there name to Datsun for their entry into the US market in order to avoid any possible stigma associated with the name Nissan. They were still known as Nissan in japan however and used it for their industrial equipment.

I guess in the early 80's they noticed Kawasaki and Mitsubishi doing just fine and started using Nissan again.

I have no clue what they built during the war though. Anyone know? I don't think they built planes, maybe tanks or rifles or something. I guess I could google it....

I dunno what Suzuki did either, but they have a bike called the Hayabusa now, which was also a name used for a fighter aircraft aircraft made by Nakajima (and a bird, maybe lots of things get called the Hayabusa in Japan). Are they the same company? And if so, where is the 2004 Mitsubishi Reisen mid-engine sports coupe, or the new Kawasaki Hien Motorcycle.

Ricers would have that Reisen painted white with a big red circle on the side in no time.

Welshman_PF
02-22-2004, 03:04 AM
not sure if this is the same hanomag but this is what they made last .
http://www.warwick-ward.com/art/70e.jpg

Jirozaemon
02-22-2004, 03:57 AM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by PlaneEater:
"Lesee... WWII aircraft manufacturers (the ones I remember anyway) and where they are today:

Messerschmitt (Me/Bf-109) got pretty dismantled by the end of the war. Willy Messerschmitt restarted the company post-war doing prefabricated houses and other consumer stuff. Around 1968, we got Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH."

Messerschmitt-B¶lkow-Blohm is now a part of DASA (EADS), the company which bulids the Eurofighter today (you may check out Janes for additional information).

"Focke-Wulf (Fw-190) basically ceased to be at the end of the war, when Kurt Tank went to Argentina. Flugwerks (GmbH Germany) is manufacturing new Fw-190s for the private sector in kit form, based off the old blueprints. I'm not sure if they're an actual resurrection of Focke-Wulf or not."

They are not... Actually they restore historical warbirds of many manufacturers.

"Blohm und Voss (Bv-222)--not sure about Voss. The Blohm half survived to form the Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm GmbH conglomerate, though."

Blohm und Voss went back to the roots after the war and concentrated on their shipyards. I think they were taken over by "Vulkan" in the 90`s. The "Vulkan" collapsed, but B&V is still active today.

Greets

Jiro

[This message was edited by Jirozaemon on Sun February 22 2004 at 03:13 AM.]

JimRockford
02-22-2004, 10:22 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by PlaneEater:

Northrop (P-61) merged with Grumman (F4F). Boeing ate them.

<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually Boeing and Northrup-Gruman are two separate corporations. BA and NOC on the NYSE.

NOC is a good stock, I'd say buy some if anyone asked.

73GIAP_Milan
02-22-2004, 11:53 AM
Dutch companies all got bankrupt or disbanded
Koolhoven; bankrupt AND disbanded

Fokker was the last one, almost got bankrupt, got taken over by Stork, and Stork left it for what it was...
Fokker is no more.... http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

only it's name and legacy remain...

Der Tote Baron a.k.a. SK_Black_Knight....
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Sky Knights Squadron Leader