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rob1990312
03-07-2017, 09:11 AM
So there's a rumour that ac empire will have a bit of an inspiration from the witcher3, some people are happy about this including me but some aren't
What I would like to see carry over to ac is the mission selection. Selecting missions in w3 is seamless and easy like in a lot of other game. If a mission is too hard or boring you can just run away and start a different mission nearby by toggling a different quest mission in the menu with no loading time or having to abort the mission. If you then want to go back to this mission, in most cases you go right back to where you left off with out having to start over.
I think ac method of starting missions is old fashioned now having to load a mission and then have load again if you want to abort it. You have to start again from the beginning then when you start again. It is annoying to me and it breaks immersion. I know it's tied to the lore and that it's entering specific memories but this was only OK when it was in original or early ac games that depended on that type of loading. It is a good option for replaying memories only.
What do ye think
Should ac copy this way of working or even other games or should it remain the same
I think it should copy this or at least be overhauling.

D.I.D.
03-07-2017, 12:57 PM
Yeah, I like that system. There's the small flaw that you might not see everything the game has to offer in one playthrough, with no checklist on the map to consult, but I consider that a benefit.

There might be problems. It's much more complicated to create the in-game conditions to trigger a seemingly spontaneous mission. Although TW3 got a lot of praise for being so well made, even that game had some major bugs that prevented certain missions from continuing for me and many other players, and it was only after a lot of frustration and Googling that we could confirm for ourselves that something had gone wrong. The next AC needs to continue Syndicate's good reputation in order to convince the market that the series is squashing its infamous glitch issues.

SixKeys
03-07-2017, 01:03 PM
I think it's misguided to refer to the two different systems as old-fashioned vs. modern. It's just a different approach. TW3 side missions are entire mini-stories and TBH, it doesn't make sense narratively that you can just abandon them midway to go do something else. "Yes, Mrs. Widower, I finally found the trail of the werewolf that killed your husband. I shall not rest until I-- ooh, shiny!"
Whether you happen to like that kind of ADHD approach to narrative is a personal preference, but it's unrealistic to say the least. If the assassin starts his mission on January 14th, it makes no freaking sense for him to abandon it, come back a week later and everybody is still exactly in the same positions they were, discussing the exact same topic, as if they were frozen in time. It's more immersion-breaking for me when Geralt attacks a monster in its lair the first time, aborts the mission, comes back later and the monster hasn't taken any precautions or switched hiding places since their last encounter.

D.I.D.
03-07-2017, 02:44 PM
^^^ Ah, yes - I'd forgotten that drawback! It's somewhat forgiveable, in that you can behave diligently if you find that this breaks your immersion, but then again if you wander about exploring and engaging with the world as you should then you will inevitably build up a long list of things to do. Certain "urgent" tasks will not even be begun until months have passed, in terms of game story.

There's something else I like about TW3's missions, which is that many of the events are out there happening in the world. There were many times when I would discover a particularly nasty monster in open land, kill it, and then discover the quest-giver some time later. I really liked this, particularly for the way that Geralt would surprise the NPC by telling him/her that the job had already been handled, but then again I was sometimes left with a nagging feeling that I'd missed out on the intended story. Despite this, I still knew that my own story of discovering a monster nest, or reaching the crest of a hill and being attacked by a griffon diving out of the storm clouds, was pretty great too.

Usercake
03-07-2017, 06:11 PM
So there's a rumour that ac empire will have a bit of an inspiration from the witcher3, some people are happy about this including me but some aren't
What I would like to see carry over to ac is the mission selection. Selecting missions in w3 is seamless and easy like in a lot of other game. If a mission is too hard or boring you can just run away and start a different mission nearby by toggling a different quest mission in the menu with no loading time or having to abort the mission. If you then want to go back to this mission, in most cases you go right back to where you left off with out having to start over.
I think ac method of starting missions is old fashioned now having to load a mission and then have load again if you want to abort it. You have to start again from the beginning then when you start again. It is annoying to me and it breaks immersion. I know it's tied to the lore and that it's entering specific memories but this was only OK when it was in original or early ac games that depended on that type of loading. It is a good option for replaying memories only.
What do ye think
Should ac copy this way of working or even other games or should it remain the same
I think it should copy this or at least be overhauling.

he he look at this thread , clearly you don't know UBISOFT & the crap anvil engine they use , if only CDPK makes AC games ,they'll do 100 times better , like how rockstar did with maxpayne series

D.I.D.
03-07-2017, 08:12 PM
he he look at this thread , clearly you don't know UBISOFT & the crap anvil engine they use , if only CDPK makes AC games ,they'll do 100 times better , like how rockstar did with maxpayne series

The "crap" Anvil engine is considered pretty spectacular by anyone who knows what they're talking about. They made an engine which made massive leaps -- not once but twice -- in the limits on the numbers of NPCs that could theoretically be drawn on screen. They did that while also revolutionising NPCs' interactions with each other to create living populations that can reform in new interactive groups. The variety and detail in everything from buildings to plant life and other set-dressing is a testament to the work of the creators and the cleverness of the people who built the engine tools. CD Projekt Red made an awesome engine too, which deserves its own praise, but this is a zero-sum game: many of the wonderful things their engine does prevents it from doing some of the wonderful things Anvil does, and vice versa.

I guess it felt pretty nice to use one game as a stick with which to beat another, with no understanding of what it takes to make any of it work, but you're ultimately making your own life worse by doing that. Rather than enjoying the marvels in AC's construction, you're choosing to feel disappointment instead. I'm not saying you have to force yourself to enjoy bad work because every game is an achievement, or anything like that, but I am saying that from a technical point of view AC is pretty hard to fault unless your understanding of how its world is generated is very crude.

jellejackhammer
03-07-2017, 08:22 PM
The "crap" Anvil engine is considered pretty spectacular by anyone who knows what they're talking about. They made an engine which made massive leaps -- not once but twice -- in the limits on the numbers of NPCs that could theoretically be drawn on screen. They did that while also revolutionising NPCs' interactions with each other to create living populations that can reform in new interactive groups. The variety and detail in everything from buildings to plant life and other set-dressing is a testament to the work of the creators and the cleverness of the people who built the engine tools. CD Projekt Red made an awesome engine too, which deserves its own praise, but this is a zero-sum game: many of the wonderful things their engine does prevents it from doing some of the wonderful things Anvil does, and vice versa.

I guess it felt pretty nice to use one game as a stick with which to beat another, with no understanding of what it takes to make any of it work, but you're ultimately making your own life worse by doing that. Rather than enjoying the marvels in AC's construction, you're choosing to feel disappointment instead. I'm not saying you have to force yourself to enjoy bad work because every game is an achievement, or anything like that, but I am saying that from a technical point of view AC is pretty hard to fault unless your understanding of how its world is generated is very crude.

agree.

as average as unity was i must admit that the world looked amazing. notre dame and the bastielle are wonderfull replica's and awsome to climb . paris was indeed a living videogame on it's own :p

cawatrooper9
03-07-2017, 10:27 PM
I don't know much about Witcher 3, but is it at all similar to WatchDogs 2's mission selection? I thought that was a pretty decent way of doing missions in open world games.

Helforsite
03-07-2017, 10:35 PM
The "crap" Anvil engine is considered pretty spectacular by anyone who knows what they're talking about. They made an engine which made massive leaps -- not once but twice -- in the limits on the numbers of NPCs that could theoretically be drawn on screen. They did that while also revolutionising NPCs' interactions with each other to create living populations that can reform in new interactive groups. The variety and detail in everything from buildings to plant life and other set-dressing is a testament to the work of the creators and the cleverness of the people who built the engine tools. CD Projekt Red made an awesome engine too, which deserves its own praise, but this is a zero-sum game: many of the wonderful things their engine does prevents it from doing some of the wonderful things Anvil does, and vice versa.

I guess it felt pretty nice to use one game as a stick with which to beat another, with no understanding of what it takes to make any of it work, but you're ultimately making your own life worse by doing that. Rather than enjoying the marvels in AC's construction, you're choosing to feel disappointment instead. I'm not saying you have to force yourself to enjoy bad work because every game is an achievement, or anything like that, but I am saying that from a technical point of view AC is pretty hard to fault unless your understanding of how its world is generated is very crude.

Speaking of engines, is anyone as excited as me about what AnvilNext 3.0 has in store for us? I personally would love some Vulkan/DirextX12 implementation, better AI and multithread optimisation. Now, I know that they could still be using 2.0, but with PS4 Pro and Xbox Scorpio on the market at launch, having the extra time to optimise with the year off and them wanting to dazzle us with the new game which should revolutinize and revitalize the series, I cant think of a single good reason, why they wouldnt develop Anvil Next 3.0!
What would you guys want from AN3.0 and do you think they will use AN2.0 or AN3.0?

D.I.D.
03-07-2017, 10:50 PM
It's similar, yes. A mission can begin in many different ways. You might follow map icons, or you might discover a destroyed building and investigate how it happened, or you might read a book which contains a hint that you should follow, or you might find a public notice about a problem, or a person might call to you as you pass, or you might see an unusual circumstance playing out in the vicinity. Once you have a mission, it's added to the list in your journal. It's up to you which missions you complete (although some are essential, of course!) and in what order, and placing a mission into primary priority is as simple as selecting it in the journal. There are main quests, secondary quests, treasure hunts and contracts. The initial world is very large, so you don't feel restricted to one location, although it also expands dramatically just when you think you've seen the extent of the game. Soon, you're jumping all over the game world doing quests in different regions as you wish.

There are many doors that can open or close to you as a result of your choices, which is why the game is famous for feeling very engaging to its players. Insulting a powerful character could be a bad move, while showing deference can also be the "wrong" thing to do. Ultimately, you abandon yourself to it and learn to love whatever results the game serves to you, because this pruning of the story tree is inevitable. Some people made all the "wrong" choices in the story's core pursuit. These moments are hard to spot because they seem to be relatively inconsequential, but there will eventually be a reckoning for them. I watched videos earlier today that show you what happens if you do all of these things "wrong", and even that ending is kind of great!


I don't know much about Witcher 3, but is it at all similar to WatchDogs 2's mission selection? I thought that was a pretty decent way of doing missions in open world games.

cawatrooper9
03-07-2017, 10:53 PM
Sounds interesting. I might have to give W3 a shot.

I know a lot of people don't want to have the branching storyline method for the AC series, but I think we jumped the Animus rules shark a while ago. As long as the story has some points that always sync up to serve as a sort of anchor for the meta story in the series, I think it could totally work.

D.I.D.
03-08-2017, 05:06 AM
Do it! I should warn you: there is almost too much going on. If you march down the correct path immediately, you could no doubt find yourself instantly enchanted by the game. In my case, I tried a little bit of this and a little bit of that until more than a dozen hours had passed and the game still hadn't clicked with me. But when it did? The thing ate a hundred hours of my life, and then kept on eating more of it through the excellent DLC expansions. You really, really should give this a try, especially now that it's so cheap. [ETA - I played The Witcher 3 with no experience of The Witcher or The Witcher 2. It's not necessary to play the other games first.]

Some things about it are a little frustrating if you're not big on crafting. There were times when I desperately needed certain crafting items, and it turned out that I needed to dismantle other things in order to get them. Sometimes the components of an item can be really unintuitive when you're looking at the complete object. You would not expect, for example, that if a recipe required Monster Feathers that you'd need to dismantle Harpy Feathers, or that dismantled Spectre Dust could get you Monster Tissue. It can be incredibly longwinded when you're having to turn an ore into a refined ore into an alloy into a plate metal over and over again in order to fashion some armour. But, despite hating that kind of thing, I love this game with all my heart and I'll certainly play it all over again.


Sounds interesting. I might have to give W3 a shot.

I know a lot of people don't want to have the branching storyline method for the AC series, but I think we jumped the Animus rules shark a while ago. As long as the story has some points that always sync up to serve as a sort of anchor for the meta story in the series, I think it could totally work.

rob1990312
06-19-2017, 01:18 AM
Looks like this type of mission selection is happening now