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View Full Version : How to taxi Ho-229



Georing
03-06-2004, 12:44 PM
It's kind of problem to me.
HELP !

Georing
03-06-2004, 12:44 PM
It's kind of problem to me.
HELP !

BaronVonSnoopy
03-06-2004, 03:25 PM
While I wouldn't be wanting to taxi any ho's...sorry, couldn't resist. It's weird, seems you have to use the brakes for a differential effect to get it to turn even with the giant front tire.

diomedes33
03-06-2004, 04:03 PM
I found the easiest way to turn the thing on the ground is with brakes and differential thrust. No rudder and prop wash effect so you can't whip it around like a conventional plane.

Also, unless you're flying to egypt and back, you will not need 100% fuel load, drop it to 50% or even 25% if its a df server.

Hard part I have is keeping the thing on the runway during takeoff. It seems to get real floaty around 60 - 90 kph and occilates from side to side and lags into turns with rudder inputs (dutch role I think).

http://www.public.asu.edu/~guthriec/ubi_sig.jpg

03-06-2004, 04:16 PM
There isn't much that can be done to make the Go-229 fly right, because of the limitations of the FM. My main peeves with it are (1) the yaw stability and (2) inboard trailing edge flaps.

The flaps on the Go-229 don't behave properly. Dropping them causes an incorrect nose-up pitching moment. Looking from external views, the full "landing flaps" position would be be enough to cause an unrecoverable nose dive!

In real life those trailing edge flaps were only deflected small amount, as the outboard elevons had to counteract them to keep the wing trimmed. The Go-229 may have even deflected the flaps upwards (crow) to increase drag and dump lift.

Any Hortens experts know what the inboard TE flaps were used for in real life?

The Go-229 isn't totally bad, though... Gibbage has created a real masterpiece. It's Luft '46 so I can live with inaccuracy - especially when it looks so good! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif