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XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 04:35 AM
Anyone heard of THIS plane "Blohm & Voss BV155 CP.205" ..?
Thanks!

/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif Panther

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-132_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-130_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-222_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-169_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-208_1.jpg


http://members.aol.com/kplok/images/bowman.jpg

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 04:35 AM
Anyone heard of THIS plane "Blohm & Voss BV155 CP.205" ..?
Thanks!

/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif Panther

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-132_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-130_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-222_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-169_1.jpg


http://www.ne.jp/asahi/***ugiya/sky/72-092-208_1.jpg


http://members.aol.com/kplok/images/bowman.jpg

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:29 AM
Well, I just did a quick search and came up dry../i/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif Anyone have some juicy stats on this?

/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif Panther


http://members.aol.com/kplok/images/bowman.jpg

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:33 AM
Other then its ugly? No.

Gib

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XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:36 AM
A recce plane and a high altitude interceptor. Altitude projected 56000ft! many military jets cannot fly that high. Not realized and replaced in the interceptor role with Ta-152H.


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XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:37 AM
Gibbage1 wrote:
- Other then its ugly? No.

at least the model is nice/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif


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XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:37 AM
i believe i remember that plane in ..war planes of the third reich by william green ...sadly i lent it to my dad many yrs ago and he wont send it back /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

U.S. infantry 84-91

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:41 AM
Thanks Huckebein! /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif Panther

http://members.aol.com/kplok/images/bowman.jpg

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:42 AM
i just did a quick search there is all kind of stuff just cut off the CP.205 and bingo pages of info

U.S. infantry 84-91

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 05:45 AM
HERE YOU GO............Blohm & Voss Bv 155
The high-flying changeling
The Bv 155 high-altitude interceptor was an example of how NOT to design a combat aircraft. It went through an agonizing number of design changes, starting off as a single-seat carrier-based fighter evolving into a precision bomber, then went through several incarnations as a high-altitude interceptor. It even went through a change of manufacturers. Here is a summary of its history.
The saga of the BV 155 high altitude interceptor actually began at Messerschmitt in the spring of 1942. At that time, it was known under the designation of Me 155, and was a company proposal for a carrier-based single seat fighter. The Me 155 was intended to be based aboard the Graf Zeppelin aircraft carrier, then under construction. In the interest of economy and simplicity, the Me 155 was to use as many Bf 109 components as possible, being basically a navalized version of the earlier Messerschmitt fighter. The Me 155 was to be powered by a DB 605A-1 liquid-cooled engine of 1475 hp. The fuselage was more-or-less that of the standard Bf 109G, but with an entirely new wing. The undercarrage retracted inwards into wing wells, providing the wider track required for safe carrier landings. Standard naval equipment such as folding wings, catapult spools, and arrester gear were to be fitted. Proposed armament was an engine mounted 20-mm MG 151 cannon and two 20-mm MG 151 cannon and two 13-mm MG 131 machine guns in wings. Estimated maximum speed of 403 mph.

Detail design of the Me 155 was complete by Sept 1942. However, the numerous delays in the Graf Zeppelin seemed to indicate that the launching of the carrier would be at least two years away. Messerschmitt was told to shelve the Me 155 project for the indefinite future. In the event, work on the Graf Zeppelin carrier was abandoned in favor of more submarines.

In order that all of that work on the Me 155 project not go entirely to waste, Messerschmitt adapted its design in November 1942 to fulfill a Luftwaffe requirement for a fast single seat bomber. A single 2205 lb SC 1000 bomb was to be carried. All of the carrier equipment and most of the armament was removed from the aircraft. Additional fuel cells were provided and an elongated, non- retractable tailwheel was added to provide ground clearance for the large bomb. The proposal was designated Me 155A.

By the end of 1942, the increasing number of USAAF bombing raids and intelligence coming in about the new American B-29 bomber led the Luftwaffe to envisage a pressing need for an effective high-altitude interceptor. The Messerschmitt outfit adapted its design to this requirement under the designation Me 155B. The engine was to be the DB 628, which was basically a DB 605A with a two-stage mechanical supercharger with an induction cooler. A pressure cabin was to be provided. It was estimated that a service ceiling of 46,250 feet could be attained.

A converted Bf 109G adapted to take the DB 628 engine flew in May 1942 and attained an altitude of 50,850 feet. However, the Technische Amt concluded that a DB 603A engine with an exhaust-driven turbosupercharger was more promising. The DB 603A provided 1610 hp for takeoff and 1450 hp at 49,210 feet. This engine change required that the fuselage be elongated in order to house the turbosupercharger aft of the pressure cabin. Exhaust gases were carried to the turbosupercharger via external ducts. Air was drawn in through via a ventral trough aft of the wing. Standard Bf 109G wings were to be fitted outboard of a new, long-span, untapered wing center section. Other parts were scavenged from existing Messerschmitt designs --- the vertical tail was from the Me 209, and the horizontal tail and the undercarriage were taken from the Bf 109G.

In August 1943, the Technische Amt decided that Messerschmitt was over-committed, and they decided to transfer the work on the design to the Blohm und Voss outfit. After some initial study, the Blohm and Voss design team deemed that the existing Messerschmitt design had too many weaknesses. Several months of argument and finger-pointing between the Messerschmitt transition team and the Blohm und Voss designers followed. Friction between the two teams got steadily worse. In the event, no meeting of the minds was possible, and the Technische Amt eventually decided to throw Messerschmitt off the project entirely, and turn it entirely over to Blohm und Voss.

The Blohm und Voss team elected to adopt a laminar-flow airfoil section, and abandoned the idea of using standard Bf 109G wings for the outer panels. The wing center section was redesigned. Two large radiators were mounted over the wing trailing edges at the extremeties of the center section. Ju 87D-6 undercarriage legs and wheels used instead of the Bf 109G units. The Bf 109G horizontal tail surfaces were replaced with larger area freshly-designed units, and the vertical tail surface was increased in size.

The first prototype was designated BV 155 V1, and flew for the first time Sept 1, 1944. Tests with the V1 showed that the outboard radiators were not sufficently effective in providing cooling, especially at high angles of attack. The intakes on the next prototype were enlarged and underslung beneath the wing rather than placed over it. However, the enlarged radiators caused an c.g. problem, which required moving the pressurized cockpit forward. The Blohm und Voss team took this opportunity to replace the original Bf 109G canopy with an aft-sliding all-round vision canopy, and the rear fuselage decking was cut down. This in turn required that a larger rudder be fitted. The ventral radiator bath was also enlarged.

All these changes were incorporated into the BV 155 V2, which flew for the first time on February 8, 1945. which was the first genuine Bseries aircraft. The Blohm und Voss team was still not satisfied with the design, and before the V-2 began its flight trials they proposed that the engine be switched to the DB 603U having the larger mechanically-driven supercharger of the DB 603E. The DB 603U promised a power of 1660 hp for takeoff and 1430 hp at 49,000 feet. The ventral turbosupercharger was retained. The Technishe Amt decided to accept this proposal, and abandoned all work on the BV 155B in favor of the revised design, which was designated BV 155C.

The BV 155C was quite different in appearance from the BV-155B. The clumsy wing-mounted radiators of the BV-155B were eliminated, and the main landing gear leg attachment points were moved inboard to retract inwards. The cooling was provided by an annular frontal radiator a la Ta 152. Large circular intakes were attached to the fuselage sides above the wing roots.

In the meantime, the BV 155 V2 was damaged beyond repair during a bad landing. It was to be replaced in the test program by the BV 155 V3. The BV 155 V3 differed from the V2 in having the DB 603U intended for the BV 155C. However, the engine cowling and turbosupercharger were unchanged.

Various armament schemes for the BV 155B were proposed. One proposal had an engine-mounted 30-mm MK 108 cannon and two 20-mm MG 151/20 cannon. Another had an engine- mounted MK 103 cannon and two wing-mounted 15mm MG 151 cannon. Estimated maximum speed was 404 mph at 39,370 feet and 429 mph at 52,490 feet. Service ceiling was to be 55,610 feet. Empty weight was 10,734 lbs. Normal loaded weight ranged from 11,300 to 12,100 lbs, depending on the armament provided.

The program was brought to an abrupt end when the Allies occupied the Blohm und Voss factory at Finkenwerder in April of 1945. At that time, the V3 was 75 percent completed, but assembly of the C-series prototypes had not yet commenced. The V-3 was eventually taken to the USA for examination. I am unaware of its ultimate fate.

Source:
Warplanes of the Third Reich, William Green, Doubleday, New York, 1970.
Joe Baugher

U.S. infantry 84-91

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 06:02 AM
Outstanding tenmike! /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

/i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif Panther

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XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 06:11 AM
Yes! Extreamly well done custom job. Looks like a 1/72. Im currently doing a 1/48 Do-335 by Tamiya. This is my first Tamiya kit. I must say WOW! Much better then the Monogram stuff I did in the past. To bad they are so expensive!!!

Gib

Huckebein_FW wrote:
- Gibbage1 wrote:
-- Other then its ugly? No.
-
- at least the model is nice

I am now accepting donations to help get the PBY flyable.

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XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 06:25 AM
According to my German Aircraft of the Second World War by Antony L. Kay and J.R. Smith:


The checkered life of the Blohm und Voss Bv155 started at Messerschmidt AG at the beginning of 1942 when that concern began the design of a shipboard fighter designated the Me155. Already during,during 1940-41,60 Bf-109Es had been converted to 109Ts for German aircraft carriers,the first of which,the Graf Zeppelin,had been launched on Dec.18 1938. As with the 109Ts,the Me155 was also to employ a maximum of 109 parts in order to facilitate development and was to use a 109G fuselage with a new wing and undercarriage and the neccessary naval equipment. This aircraft was not proeceded with since German carrier and ship conversion work was abandoned in 1942. A modified version was begun in Nov.1942 as the Me155A. This was to be a single seat Schnellbomber(high-speed bomber) designed to carry a single 1000kg bomb for precision attacks on special targets. Since no official backing for this design was forthcoming,it was again reworked,this time as as the Me155B-1 high-alt. fighter. This was to be powered by a DB605 engine to work at altitudes up to 11000m using a two stage mechanical supercharger and eight separate underwing radiators. A prototype of the Me155B-1 was begun and consisted basically of a 109G airframe with a new wing center section to increase the span to 21m and a new fin similar to one designed for the Me209 V5. There was also some lengthening of the fuselage to accomodate the supercharger equipment and maintain balance. Before this machine was finished,however the RLM ordered the transference of the development to Blohm und Voss in Aug. 1943. With this change,the Me155B-1 was redesignated the Bv155A-1 for which the 1st prototype was designated the Bv155 V1. Although the aircraft begun by Messerschmidt retained many 109 parts(and also main undercarriage members from a Junkers Ju-87D-6),extensive redesigning was carried out under Dr. Richard Vogt's leadership,the most apparent change change being the provision of a new wing with two large radiators mounted above it at about the quater span positions. Although the undercarriage had an exceptionally wide track, the main gear legs retracted outwards so that the main wheels could be housed in the area of the increased depth at the radiator sections. The Bv155 V1 was built at the Finkenwerder works,Hamburg, and made it's maiden flight on Feb.8 1945,powered by a 1610hp DB603A engine. On this flight,the plane ran into trouble with overheating,and as a result the Bv155 V2,which began flying on Feb.15,had it's wing radiators beneath instead of above the wings. Although the radiators had large air intake sections, their developed profiles followed a similar line and thickness/chord ratio to the wing and,accordingly,the radiator extended forward and aft of the wind chord. Other changes made in the V2 prototype included increasing the wing chord and fitting a new bulged cockpit canopy. The aircraft was similarly powered to the V1,and bothe prototypes tested the Hirth TKL 15 supercharger which was installed in the fuselage behind the cockpit,was exhaust driven,and provided with a large ventral air intake. Results provided by these aircraft and project studies brought about some rethinking of the design so that the Bv155 V3 was put aside when partially completed,the proposed Bv155B series was abandoned and the decision was made to proceed toward the Bv155C series for which the Bv155 V4 was to act as the prototype. The V4 was powered by an 1810hp DB603U engine with the Hirth TKL 15 supercharger and had both the wing span and undercarriage track reduced. Thirty Bv155 C-0 preproduction fighters were ordered,of which the V4 was the first,but this prototype had just been completed and was not flown by the time the war ended. The Bv155 V2 is believed to be held by the Smithsonian institute in Washington,D.C.


Bv 155 V2 stats:

Span:20.5m
Length:12m
Wing area:29 sq m
Empty weight:4860kg
Loaded weight:5625kg
Max.Speed at 16000m:690km/h
Climb to 16000m:29 min.
Service ceiling:16950m
Range:about 1500km

The book makes no mention of armament. Hope this helps./i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

47|FC
http://rangerring.com/wwii/p-47.jpg

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 06:49 AM
HERES WHAT SMITSONION SAYS,(THEY HAVE IT)........From a tail-hook fighter flying from aircraft carriers to a high-altitude bomber interceptor, the Blohm & Voss BV 155 had an interesting and convoluted development history. It was also one of the most technically advanced propeller-driven airplanes developed by any combatant during World War II. In May, 1942, the Reichluftfahrtministerium (German Air Ministry or RLM) convened a meeting with Focke-Wulf and Messerschmitt representatives to review requirements for two new aircraft development projects. One was a single-engine fighter to operate from aircraft carriers, the other specification described a Spezial H√¬∂henj√¬§ger, an airplane capable of intercepting bombers at high altitudes and conducting reconnaissance as a secondary mission. The two firms were then fully engaged in building the Fw 190 and Bf 109 and they expressed concern about trying to develop two very ambitious designs on top of existing commitments. Focke-Wulf decided to ignore the carrier fighter and concentrate on the high-altitude interceptor proposal. Two years later, the firm met the high-altitude fighter requirement magnificently with the Focke-Wulf Ta 152H (also in the NASM collection).

In 1943, the RLM identified an offshoot high-altitude fighter concept known as the Extremer H√¬∂henj√¬§ger, or extreme high-altitude fighter. To meet this need, the Messerschmitt designed the Me 155B and after a clumsy, protracted development period, Blohm & Voss took over and transformed the design into a promising, though technically challenging experimental aircraft called the BV 155.

From the May 1942 concept for a carrier-based fighter designated the Bf 109 ST, Messerschmitt proposed three variants: two versions of the naval fighter with different engines and a high-altitude interceptor equipped with the Jumo 213. The company soon merged the two carrier-based designs into a concept called the Me 155A. The bomber interceptor became the Me 155B. Both designs used many components from the Bf 109G, except for the wing and landing gear. Although these concepts showed promise, the work rapidly overtaxed Messerschmitt's design department and the firm transferred the Me 155B project to a new design office in Paris staffed by French aircraft designers. This group was, understandably, less than totally dedicated to the effort.

When Germany stopped work on all major surface vessels in January 1943, the Me 155A carrier airplane was cancelled too. French progress to develop the Me 155B was so slight that Messerschmitt stopped the work and refocused its own design staff on developing the Me 209 (a pre-war design that set a world speed record in 1939) to meet the Extremer H√¬∂henj√¬§ger requirement. But the RLM would not let Messerschmitt drop the Me 155B. To speed progress the RLM paired Dr. Richard Vogt, chief designer at Blohm & Voss, and several hundred of his engineers and fabricators, with Messerschmitt. Both parties worked well together at first but over the next few months, the relationship soured. Messerschmitt could not resolve many critical decisions about the design including wing layout, engine, and engine coolant radiator design. Late in January 1944, the RLM directed Messerschmitt to transfer the whole project to Blohm & Voss and the BV 155 was born.

Dr. Vogt, and his team almost completely reworked the design and in the end selected the Daimler-Benz DB 603 U engine and the Heinkel-Hirth TKL 15 turbosupercharger to power the airplane. He also finalized the armament configuration and selected one MK 108 30-mm cannon in the nose and two 20 mm MG 151 cannons the wing. By late June 1944, Blohm & Voss planned to build three B-series prototypes and an improved version called the BV 155C. After RLM officials inspected the program in August, they were satisfied with progress enough enough to codename the project 'Karawanken' after a mountain range bordering Austria and Yugoslavia.

Vogt and his group created an impressive design. The BV 155 featured an armored, pressurized cabin with an ejection seat, high aspect ratio laminar-flow wings, wide-track landing gear, and a very advanced, though troublesome and complex, propulsion system.

An airscoop located on the underside of the fuselage at the trailing edge of the wing fed outside air to the TKL 15 turbo-supercharger. The supercharger compressed the air and fed it to an intercooler mounted above. A pipe semi-recessed into the left fuselage (visible below the cockpit and above the long exhaust pipe) fed the cooled, high-pressure air from the intercooler forward to the engine-driven supercharger. The RLM wanted the airplane to fly near 16 km (52, 490 ft) above the earth. Both a turbo-supercharger (driven by exhaust gases) and a mechanical supercharger (driven by a geared shaft off the engine) were the Vogt team's solution to this problem.

The mechanical supercharger pressurized the air again and fed it directly into the DB 603 U intake manifold. After the combustion cycle, semi-recessed exhaust pipes on both sides of the fuselage fed the hot exhaust aft. On both sides of the fuselage below the cockpit, the exhaust pipes angled down and split into two smaller pipes per side. Two pipes fed hot exhaust to turn the turbosupercharger and the other two pipes carried exhaust gases through a wastegate valve and exited the airplane. The wastegate valves regulated the pressure output of the turbosupercharger. Opening the valves dumped more exhaust overboard and slowed the turbo, reducing pressurized air to the engine. Blohm & Voss designed the whole power system to propel the BV 155 to speeds of about 692 kph (430 mph) at over 15,200 m (50,000 ft).

The war situation was worsening and the company moved the prototypes into newly armored hangars at Finkenwerder. Blohm &Voss completed the BV 155B V1 (V for Versuch, German for experiment) and scheduled the first flight for mid January. On February 8, 'V1 took to the air but the right radiator leaked badly and chief test pilot Helmut "Wasa" Rodig terminated the flight. Following repairs, the aircraft flew twice more on February 10 and 26. Repairs followed each flight but it is doubtful that the airplane flew again after the 26th.

All work had stopped on the third prototype, BV 155 V3, as Blohm & Voss concentrated on finishing the V2 but the war ended first. The British Army occupied Hamburg on May 3 and found the three prototypes at the factory. British officials examined the V1 and decided it was airworthy then directed an RAF pilot to fly it to England. The airplane crashed shortly after takeoff from the factory and was destroyed. The British gathered up V2 and V3 and shipped them to the test establishment at Farnborough, England, for evaluation. They seriously considered completing V2 for flight test but in the end, simply displayed the aircraft in October-November 1945 and then stored it.

For years, the identification of the National Air and Space Museum's BV 155 was mysterious. Historians knew the British shipped a BV 155 to the US after the war and that the U. S. Army Air Forces evaluated it at Wright Field, Ohio. They eventually transferred it (bearing Foreign Equipment Number FE-505) to the National Air and Space Museum. Most sources claimed this was the unfinished V3 prototype. In 1998, two restoration specialists reassembling the parts stored at the Paul E. Garber Facility in Silver Hill, Maryland, were amazed to discover nearly the entire V2 airframe. Except for wiring harnesses the factory never hooked up and other small parts, the aircraft appears to be 90-95% complete, including most of the propulsion system. German documents verify that the V3 was only half-finished at war's end and the discovery of "V2" stamped into both sides of the windshield frame seems to prove conclusively that the NASM aircraft is in fact the second prototype.

The BV 155 V2 is also the last surviving aircraft built by Blohm & Voss during the company's 12-year foray into aviation. Blohm & Voss was Germany's largest shipbuilder when the company began building aircraft in 1933.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright ‚© 1998-2000 National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution (revised 10/30/00 S. Wille and R. E. Lee)
Aircraft of the Smithsonian




U.S. infantry 84-91

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 09:26 AM
^

U.S. infantry 84-91

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 12:14 PM
Huckebein_FW wrote:
- A recce plane and a high altitude interceptor.
- Altitude projected 56000ft! many military jets
- cannot fly that high. Not realized and replaced in
- the interceptor role with Ta-152H.
-

It is hard to have it replaced by the Ta152H since it was still under development when the war ended. (there is one, or parts of one, in Washington DC)

B&V took over its development from Messerschmitt(Me155, P 1091).

The prototype Bv 155 V1 flew on Feb 8 1945. It flew at 3 times.

For more history on the a/c, read Monogram Close-Up #20 if you can find it.(out of print for a long time) ISBN 0-914144-20-0


http://a1276.g.akamai.net/7/1276/734/625ed428e022ef/www.harley-davidson.com/PR/MOT/2004/Softail/images/DOM/img_Softail_FXST.jpg

http://www.redneckengineering.com/photogallery/photo23581/curves-done-03.jpg


"Only a dead 'chamber pot' is a good 'chamber pot'!"

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 12:29 PM
Yes! Extreamly well done custom job. Looks like a 1/72. Im currently doing a 1/48 Do-335 by Tamiya. This is my first Tamiya kit. I must say WOW! Much better then the Monogram stuff I did in the past. To bad they are so expensive!



Yes, Tamiya makes a quality 1/48 kit. If you can find kits by a Korean outfit called Accurate Miniatures, get them. They are no longer are in business, unfortunately. Kits were too good. Hasegawa also makes a nice kit.
Only complaint with Tamiya is the decal set. Try AreoMaster decals for top quality screens. Makes a big difference.

Thanks for the great info on the B&V. My favorite LF rig is the asymetrical, single engine BV 141. It flew!



Horrido!

Message Edited on 09/15/0304:34AM by missiveus

XyZspineZyX
09-15-2003, 12:57 PM
Panther_99FS wrote:
- Anyone heard of THIS plane "Blohm & Voss BV155
- CP.205" ..?
-

from http://www.csd.uwo.ca/~pettypi/elevon/baugher_other/bv155.html

"The Bv 155 high-altitude interceptor was an example of how NOT to design a combat aircraft. It went through an agonizing number of design changes, starting off as a single-seat carrier-based fighter evolving into a precision bomber, then went through several incarnations as a high-altitude interceptor. It even went through a change of manufacturers. Here is a summary of its history.

The saga of the BV 155 high altitude interceptor actually began at Messerschmitt in the spring of 1942. At that time, it was known under the designation of Me 155, and was a company proposal for a carrier-based single seat fighter. The Me 155 was intended to be based aboard the Graf Zeppelin aircraft carrier, then under construction. In the interest of economy and simplicity, the Me 155 was to use as many Bf 109 components as possible, being basically a navalized version of the earlier Messerschmitt fighter. The Me 155 was to be powered by a DB 605A-1 liquid-cooled engine of 1475 hp. The fuselage was more-or-less that of the standard Bf 109G, but with an entirely new wing. The undercarrage retracted inwards into wing wells, providing the wider track required for safe carrier landings. Standard naval equipment such as folding wings, catapult spools, and arrester gear were to be fitted. Proposed armament was an engine mounted 20-mm MG 151 cannon and two 20-mm MG 151 cannon and two 13-mm MG 131 machine guns in wings. Estimated maximum speed of 403 mph.

Detail design of the Me 155 was complete by Sept 1942. However, the numerous delays in the Graf Zeppelin seemed to indicate that the launching of the carrier would be at least two years away. Messerschmitt was told to shelve the Me 155 project for the indefinite future. In the event, work on the Graf Zeppelin carrier was abandoned in favor of more submarines.

In order that all of that work on the Me 155 project not go entirely to waste, Messerschmitt adapted its design in November 1942 to fulfill a Luftwaffe requirement for a fast single seat bomber. A single 2205 lb SC 1000 bomb was to be carried. All of the carrier equipment and most of the armament was removed from the aircraft. Additional fuel cells were provided and an elongated, non- retractable tailwheel was added to provide ground clearance for the large bomb. The proposal was designated Me 155A.

By the end of 1942, the increasing number of USAAF bombing raids and intelligence coming in about the new American B-29 bomber led the Luftwaffe to envisage a pressing need for an effective high-altitude interceptor. The Messerschmitt outfit adapted its design to this requirement under the designation Me 155B. The engine was to be the DB 628, which was basically a DB 605A with a two-stage mechanical supercharger with an induction cooler. A pressure cabin was to be provided. It was estimated that a service ceiling of 46,250 feet could be attained.

A converted Bf 109G adapted to take the DB 628 engine flew in May 1942 and attained an altitude of 50,850 feet. However, the Technische Amt concluded that a DB 603A engine with an exhaust-driven turbosupercharger was more promising. The DB 603A provided 1610 hp for takeoff and 1450 hp at 49,210 feet. This engine change required that the fuselage be elongated in order to house the turbosupercharger aft of the pressure cabin. Exhaust gases were carried to the turbosupercharger via external ducts. Air was drawn in through via a ventral trough aft of the wing. Standard Bf 109G wings were to be fitted outboard of a new, long-span, untapered wing center section. Other parts were scavenged from existing Messerschmitt designs --- the vertical tail was from the Me 209, and the horizontal tail and the undercarriage were taken from the Bf 109G.

In August 1943, the Technische Amt decided that Messerschmitt was over-committed, and they decided to transfer the work on the design to the Blohm und Voss outfit. After some initial study, the Blohm and Voss design team deemed that the existing Messerschmitt design had too many weaknesses. Several months of argument and finger-pointing between the Messerschmitt transition team and the Blohm und Voss designers followed. Friction between the two teams got steadily worse. In the event, no meeting of the minds was possible, and the Technische Amt eventually decided to throw Messerschmitt off the project entirely, and turn it entirely over to Blohm und Voss.

The Blohm und Voss team elected to adopt a laminar-flow airfoil section, and abandoned the idea of using standard Bf 109G wings for the outer panels. The wing center section was redesigned. Two large radiators were mounted over the wing trailing edges at the extremeties of the center section. Ju 87D-6 undercarriage legs and wheels used instead of the Bf 109G units. The Bf 109G horizontal tail surfaces were replaced with larger area freshly-designed units, and the vertical tail surface was increased in size.

The first prototype was designated BV 155 V1, and flew for the first time Sept 1, 1944. Tests with the V1 showed that the outboard radiators were not sufficently effective in providing cooling, especially at high angles of attack. The intakes on the next prototype were enlarged and underslung beneath the wing rather than placed over it. However, the enlarged radiators caused an c.g. problem, which required moving the pressurized cockpit forward. The Blohm und Voss team took this opportunity to replace the original Bf 109G canopy with an aft-sliding all-round vision canopy, and the rear fuselage decking was cut down. This in turn required that a larger rudder be fitted. The ventral radiator bath was also enlarged.

All these changes were incorporated into the BV 155 V2, which flew for the first time on February 8, 1945. which was the first genuine Bseries aircraft. The Blohm und Voss team was still not satisfied with the design, and before the V-2 began its flight trials they proposed that the engine be switched to the DB 603U having the larger mechanically-driven supercharger of the DB 603E. The DB 603U promised a power of 1660 hp for takeoff and 1430 hp at 49,000 feet. The ventral turbosupercharger was retained. The Technishe Amt decided to accept this proposal, and abandoned all work on the BV 155B in favor of the revised design, which was designated BV 155C.

The BV 155C was quite different in appearance from the BV-155B. The clumsy wing-mounted radiators of the BV-155B were eliminated, and the main landing gear leg attachment points were moved inboard to retract inwards. The cooling was provided by an annular frontal radiator a la Ta 152. Large circular intakes were attached to the fuselage sides above the wing roots.

In the meantime, the BV 155 V2 was damaged beyond repair during a bad landing. It was to be replaced in the test program by the BV 155 V3. The BV 155 V3 differed from the V2 in having the DB 603U intended for the BV 155C. However, the engine cowling and turbosupercharger were unchanged.

Various armament schemes for the BV 155B were proposed. One proposal had an engine-mounted 30-mm MK 108 cannon and two 20-mm MG 151/20 cannon. Another had an engine- mounted MK 103 cannon and two wing-mounted 15mm MG 151 cannon. Estimated maximum speed was 404 mph at 39,370 feet and 429 mph at 52,490 feet. Service ceiling was to be 55,610 feet. Empty weight was 10,734 lbs. Normal loaded weight ranged from 11,300 to 12,100 lbs, depending on the armament provided.

The program was brought to an abrupt end when the Allies occupied the Blohm und Voss factory at Finkenwerder in April of 1945. At that time, the V3 was 75 percent completed, but assembly of the C-series prototypes had not yet commenced. The V-3 was eventually taken to the USA for examination."



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