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Dammerung
04-24-2004, 07:56 PM
Thought I'd make a thread to put all the stories people post about the War...

I have one of my grandfather, told from my father though, he didn't talk too much about the war.

He was Enlisted USN, an AA gunner on a light carrier USS Ommaney Bay. It was in Leyte Gulf, I believe, when he asked his CO for a cup of coffee, and his CO didn't have a problem with it. While he was drinking coffee, a Japanese Kamikaze came high and dived in and nailed the same turret he was stationed to. He was later stationed to a different ship, which also went down and survived both. The name of it slips me, but I believe it was also a CVE. He got a Bronze Star, but we didn't find it until he died in '98 and went through his belongings.

Dammerung
04-24-2004, 07:56 PM
Thought I'd make a thread to put all the stories people post about the War...

I have one of my grandfather, told from my father though, he didn't talk too much about the war.

He was Enlisted USN, an AA gunner on a light carrier USS Ommaney Bay. It was in Leyte Gulf, I believe, when he asked his CO for a cup of coffee, and his CO didn't have a problem with it. While he was drinking coffee, a Japanese Kamikaze came high and dived in and nailed the same turret he was stationed to. He was later stationed to a different ship, which also went down and survived both. The name of it slips me, but I believe it was also a CVE. He got a Bronze Star, but we didn't find it until he died in '98 and went through his belongings.

aero6
04-24-2004, 08:27 PM
My grandfather was a Halifax and Lancaster driver.

At the age of 73, just before he died, he could still instantly name an aircraft and its model by looking at a card with only a black filled outline (silhouette).
I would flash them quickly at him and he was never wrong, on any Axis aircraft!
He said they spent hours studying these pictures and memorizing them back in training.

He never liked talking about the war, but he made an exception with me I guess because I was young and very interested in aviation and the war.

I think he had a little fun showing off this ability, even so late in his life, so many years later.

He had some pretty amazing stories.

TC_Stele
04-24-2004, 09:06 PM
My grandfather was in WW2 involved with both the D-Day invasion and in the Pacific Theater. I'm not entirely sure what he was involved with since he doesn't talk about it much. All I know is that he was wounded and has a Purple Heart. When I was little I think I heard him talking about throwing a knife at the back of "Jap." http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif Then again I think he was drunk when he said that. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

Franzen
04-24-2004, 09:32 PM
I have a few stories, sadly true ones.

My best friend's uncle had a pretty disturbing story. He was flying supplies and troops in and out of Stalingrad for the Luftwaffe. He flew the last flight out of Stalingrad in fact. At this time the German soldiers already knew their fate. He said his plane was full, as many men as he could carry when he was leaving. He said as he was taxiing to takeoff men were jumping on the wings. By the time he landed all that was left were frozen arms on the wings. He never got over that.

Our former driver in our company was one of the guys left at Stalingrad. He was a POW until about 1956. He and many other prisoners were taken to Siberia to work in the mines. All his friends slowly died of starvation and exhaustion. He says the reason for his surviving was that fact that he was a small man. He could survive on the little food they received but he said the big guys couldn't. Everyday they were dropping like flies.

Opa was a musician in the military band. Before he passed away he started telling me things about the war. During his leave he returned to his city to find his home was a bomb crater and his wife and three little boys missing. After days of searching he was very lucky too find they were safe. If that wasn't bad enough, it happened to him seven times during the war. True nerves of steel in my opinion. Few of my family survived the war. My uncle and his 109 were listed as MIA.

My last story is a nice one. The pilot in the first story had a brother captured early in the war and taken to southern France(I think it was). Anyway, he was sent to a POW camp. On his arrival the leader of the camp said he was free to do as he wanted during his stay on 3 conditions. Firstly, even the slightest attempt at an escape meant certain death. Secondly, work hard every day. Thirdly and most importantly, do not go near his daughter. He sat out the war in that camp and actually built a lasting friendship with his captors. The camp leader's wife passed away just a few years ago. From my friend's uncle's release until the year the camp leader's wive died he sent her flowers for everyone of her birthdays. I think the key to his survival was a certain daughter's innocence. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

That's all for now, I hope you guyz enjoyed these. I wish there were more war stories like the last and fewer of the first.

Fritz Franzen

VW-IceFire
04-24-2004, 09:50 PM
My grandfather, although the circumstances are somewhat unknown, was with the Polish army in 1939. When the Germans invaded and there was no hope of them doing anything, they managed to escape south...ended up in Iraq with the British Army and eventually in Egypt and then Italy. Moved to England later and then to Canada. Also have two great uncles who flew with the RCAF, one as a pilot trainer and another I think was a bomber pilot but none of them talk about it very much at all.

http://home.cogeco.ca/~cczerneda/sigs/tmv-sig1.jpg
RCAF 412 Falcon Squadron - "Swift to Avenge"

psychopetey
04-24-2004, 10:11 PM
A guy at my work brought in his uncle's medals from WWII, German, he was a mechanic on a U-boat for awhile then became a foot soldier near the end of the war. He was burnt by hot oil in the sub then sent off after that to fight as infantry where he was awared an iron cross 2nd class for saving some men or something. As well he had an infantry assault badge for 10 successful attacks an an equivalent to a purplt heart, a sort of black oak leaf cluster thing.His uncle apparently survived till the mid 50's and then died of natural causes. He had a model sub of his made of wood, looked like he made it while sitting on the sub bored, looks like he had a swatiska painted on it then was painted over in black later on, probably had to look loyal at the time.

[img/ http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/images/lrg0126.jpg]

Storm_Bird
04-24-2004, 10:13 PM
My grandfather was a Fw-190 pilot.

He always told me the stories in the war before he died.
The most funny story was:
One day in later 1944, he saw a Me-262A-a1 waas fly behind a P-47 for a long time, but the Me-262A-a1 didn't shooting it. After he landed, he asked to the Me-262A-a1 pilot why he didn't shot down the P-47. Then the Me-262A-a1 pilot told him all of the 108s was jammed, so he couldn't fire.

At last, he had been shot down about 10 planes include the P-51s, P-47s etc. He recollect that "The p-51s is quit hard to against, but they still find some ways to against it: If you want to against P-51s, you must not attack it direct. Because P-51s can endure whirl very long, but Fw-190 can't. You should use all of the Fw-190's superiority, such as roll rate. But skills and tactics is the most important, you can find a chance that the P-51 do not aware you, than you to need apporach it very quickly atit's 6 O'clock and use 4 20s(MG-151/20) and MGs to distory, but remember do not fire when it at a distance of you, the best range to fire is 20 yard to 50 yard."

I had asked him why he joined the Luftwaffe. "At 30s and 40s, the political situation was very unrest. But the most important point was we have no money, and the Treaty of Versailes was too crazy. And his first girl friend was died in a Ailled attack, so he joined the Luftwaffe and avenge to the Ailled.(Luckly, my grandfather's first girl friend was died in a Ailled attack. If not, I think I couldn't born. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/icon_twisted.gif )

http://http://www.52dby.com/non-cgi/usr/16/16_931_1.jpg

jcoulter
04-24-2004, 10:37 PM
My grandfather enlisted in the USN the day after Pearl Harbour. He was stationed on the USS Phoenix, one of the ships to escape Pearl Harbour. He was a telegrapher, a medic, and the person responsible for maintaining the ship's log. As a medic, he set broken bones, and once removed a ruptured appendix from a sailor. His civilian background was as a private dentist.

He survived a kamikaze attack in the Phillipines, the target being right where he was standing in battle station.

He said it was as if the hand of God tipped the kamikaze over sideways such that it dropped into the sea.

Funny thing, he never bought any Japanese or Mitsubishi products for the rest of his life...

He tried to let his family know of his location by sending coded messages such as quotes from the "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" to let them know he was near the equator, etc.

http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Franzen
04-24-2004, 10:40 PM
Hmmm, Storm_bird, interesting read. The last part is,...........an interesting sense of humor. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/52.gif

Just kidding http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz Franzen

Loco-S
04-24-2004, 11:36 PM
I had an Uncle ( fathers cousin)who was in the Wehrmacht with his brother, he told me his brother was hit by a sniper on the neck in a trench they had dug in, he was next to him and held him until he died of blood loss, he was one of the few who were able to escape stalingrad, another Uncle was with the hitlerjugend, he was 14 at the end of the war, he said there was this nasty SS guy who told them to fight or he personally will shoot them, and true to his word shot a guy who was afraid to fire at the russians, one of my fathers brothers ( they were 4) was killed inside a tank in Berlin 4 days before wars end, (he was 19), another was a tail gunner in a stuka ( 22), the pilot was killed by ground fire so he had to jump in the middle of the russian troops, what we know is that he was killed on the spot, we still have a letter from one of his mates telling my grandmother about his fate. half my family from father side was killed by the russkis.

http://mywebpage.netscape.com/kurbalaganda/Loco-S.gif
Armis Bela, non venenis geri

Loco-S
04-24-2004, 11:36 PM
oops. double post

huggy87
04-25-2004, 01:04 AM
One of my grandfathers was a B-24 pilot in the south pacific. He told me one interesting story of a mutiny. They were bombing targets in New Guinea and the weather was quite unpredictable. Standard procedure was to take a turn towards the north for 10 minutes if you found yourself IMC.

Well, one time they were returning from a mission and found themselves completely socked in and had to separate from the formation. The pilot (my grandfather was co-pilot at the time), kept drilling straight ahead. This was putting them at risk to run into one of new guinea's high mountainsides. The crew was getting pretty nervous and my grandfather tried to get him to turn north several times.
Finally my grandfather pulled his .45 and pointed it at the pilot and took control of the airplane.

He expected to be arrested after landing. He explained the story to his OPSO and was transferred to another crew- where he went on to have a succesful tour. Years later, at one of the bomb group reunions he attends, several of the crew from that little mutiny came up and thanked him for taking charge.

If you knew the man you would never think him capable of such an act. War does funny things to people.

Mud_Zombie9
04-25-2004, 01:50 AM
My Grandfather was a tail gunner in a B-17 and was shot down and held as a POW.From what i heard he was 1 of 3 to jump out just as their bomb payload went off. That resulted in losing nearly all of his hearing. His brother [my great uncle] was in the Pacific when he was sunk by a Jap torpedo.In which he was saved after hours of watching his buddies getting eaten by sharks. Wish i knew if it was flak or a Lufftwaffe ace that brought down grandpas bird.

GonzoX
04-25-2004, 06:21 AM
We were, are and will ALLbe effected by the events of WWII directly and indirectly for generations to come. Wars shape the world and some of todays and yesterdays smaller wars are direct results of the outcome of WWII.

Look at Vietnam, Isreal, Iraq , The Cold War and our Over-Taxation etc as direct results of decisions that were made right after WWII was over. Too many to list actually.

It makes one wondwer what the world would have been like if the Axis had either won or a truce had been found in time.

Just food for thought.

Boandlgramer
04-25-2004, 06:45 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by GonzoX:
We were, are and will ALLbe effected by the events of WWII directly and indirectly for generations to come.

Just food for thought.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>


Of course we are.
there were countless threads, where people fight with words for their country, about planes, tanks and pilots etc. etc. .
sometimes i think, the war isn´t really over , hot or cold wars , doesn´t matter. http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/images/smiley/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Boandlgramer
http://images.google.de/images?q=tbn:10LP6FCHtuYJ:www.vhts.de/bilder/wappenbayern.jpg
The first Time i saw Chuck Yeager, i shot him down. Petrosillius Zwacklmann ( WW2 Hero ).
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Somebody asked me, what i liked most, my chromium-plated Colt or my Helmet with the 4 Stars. I said : you damn Bastard, none of them, the most important thing in my life is my pink underwear.....a well know WW2 General http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
******************************
Kozhedub: In combat potential, the Yak-3, La-7 and La-9 fighters were indisputably worse to the Uhu Segelflieger aus Balsaholz. But, as they say, no matter how good the violin may be, much depends on the violinist. I always felt respect for an Uhu Balsaholzflieger pilot whose plane I failed to down.